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  1. #1
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    Road Discs- Post vs Flat mount and QR vs Thru Axle

    I'm trying to buy a new road bike. I had basically decided on one of the new Cannondale Synapse bikes until they pulled their nice carbon bar and stem off of the model I was looking at and failed to adjust the price to make up for it. So, I'm back at square one looking at bikes. I found a 2018 Specialized Tarmac Comp Disc for $3000. It has their Fact 10r carbon frame, which is one step down from the S-Works level. Bike has Ultegra 8000 mechanical w/ hydro discs. They skimped a bit here and there to keep the cost down, most notably a non-S-Works fork.

    My main concern though is that almost every bike company out there is speccing their disc brake road bikes with thru axles and flat mount calipers. Specialized has this bike with standard quick release axles and post mount calipers. What gives? Is this something to be concerned about? Are there really any drawbacks to QR and posts versus thru axles and flat mounts?

    The bike looks good on paper, and the price is alluring, considering every other disc brake carbon bike w/ Ultegra 8000 is at least $1000 more. Whichever bike I buy is going to be my "forever" bike, at least the way my budget looks now. I'd obviously love to have a dedicated bike for each type of ride I could ever do, but I need the do-it-all classic road bike for right now, and I want to get a bike that I will love and enjoy for the next 10 years. I do have a budget for upgrades, most notably a power meter and a nice set of wheels, but the bike's gotta come first and I need to make a decision sooner rather than later.

    Other bikes I am looking at:

    Orbea Orca M20 Team-D $4500 (includes semi-custom paint)

    Trek Emonda SLR 6 Disc $5000

    BMC Team Machine SLR01 Disc Two $5200

    To be honest, for the price of some of these bikes versus the price of parts, I would be tempted to buy a frame and build it up myself to get exactly what I want. Yeah, it would be longer before I had a rideable bike, but it could be the bike I really want. Is it worth the hassle of trying to do that? I mean, we're talking like an additional 6-10 months of waiting on this thing. I'm very impatient.

  2. #2
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    Well, some will say it's just a fad, but 12mm thru axles and flat mount brakes are the current standard. Brakes probably don't matter much, as long as you can mount the calipers you choose. Wheels however, is a different story.

    There is a discernable difference in stiffness of a thru-axle vs a QR. What's probably more of a concern though, si wheel hub/axle compatibility going forward. I have an older disc brake road bike with QR wheels. I can't share wheels between it and my other bikes (which are all newer and have 12mm thru axles and flat mount calipers).
    If you are going to have just one bike, with one set of wheels, compatibility isn't really a concern, as long as the upgrade wheels you choose have the right hub/axle. Some hubs (i.e DT Swiss) have interchangeable end caps that allow swapping between different axles (12mm, 15mm and some even QR). These are things to consider.

    You are looking at spending a lot of money on a high performance road bike. In my opinion, going QR is a bit of a compromise at this point. If you don't care about the wheel/axle compatibility and are willing to give up a little stiffness to save a little money on your 'forever' bike, then go for it. You can use the money you save on upgrades like PM's and Wheels.

  3. #3
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    Even at the discounted price, I would not choose a disc/QR combo. When you're dealing with about a millimeter of space between the pads and rotors, any amount of flex matters. I still get a tiny bit of rub when I'm really mashing it out of the saddle and there is heat in the system.

    Since this is going to be your "forever" bike, spend a little more and get it right. The extra costs amortized over a decade isn't going to be that huge.

  4. #4
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    Thinking out loud here, but would buying a Fuji SL disc frame for $1900 and building it myself work out to be a good deal? I priced a full dura ace mechanical hydro group for around $2200, then it just needs bar/stem/seatpost/saddle and a cheap set of wheels, could pull it off under $5000.

  5. #5
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    Thru-axles are better than QR for a disc brake bike for two reasons:

    1) First and foremost, braking forces on disc brakes put tremendous forces on your hubs. These forces can conceivably pull your wheel right out of your fork or stays.

    2) Disc brake calipers have very little clearance between the pads and disc. There is much less room for error in getting your wheel positioned just right. With a thru-axle, you know it will be in the right place every time.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Thinking out loud here, but would buying a Fuji SL disc frame for $1900 and building it myself work out to be a good deal? I priced a full dura ace mechanical hydro group for around $2200, then it just needs bar/stem/seatpost/saddle and a cheap set of wheels, could pull it off under $5000.
    I test rode the Fuji SL Disc last year and liked it. IT's not as zippy as the rim brake version, but that's to be expected. Very solid bike. I thought the sweet spot was the 2.1. It's made with a fairly light level of carbon, comes with hydro brakes, and comes in at around $3000 with Ultegra I believe. Not bad at all. The frameset is better looking in my opinion, but Performance Bike frequently has sales on the complete bikes that are tough to beat.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  7. #7
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    Dollar for Dollar, with my mind on performance though, I would go with this:

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/tc...-disc-kom-2018

    And if I was going to spend $5000, I would try to come out of the deal with electronic shifting and carbon wheels:

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/tc...ro-0-disc-2018
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #8
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    Road = Flat mount. TA front and rear. 142mm rear spacing.

    Anything else is pre-standard adoption and should be avoided.
    use a torque wrench

  9. #9
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    FWIW, the Giant TCR Advanced Disc has been by far the best riding/raciest disc brake bike I have tried at this point.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the replies, that's kind of what I was thinking. That price tag on the Specialized is so tempting, though! Like you said, I think I need to find a bike that really does tick all my boxes, especially considering how long I plan on being stuck with the thing. Also, I'm 180+ lbs and fairly strong (for a beginner), so stiffness is something I actually notice in a bike, and is part of the reason I was excited to see thru axles start showing up on road bikes in the first place.

    edit: ok, let's be honest, I'm not strong, I'm just heavier and flex my bikes and wheels because I love cake and cupcakes and ice cream and brownies and tiramisu and creme brulee and cookies and chocolate milk

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Thanks for the replies, that's kind of what I was thinking. That price tag on the Specialized is so tempting, though! Like you said, I think I need to find a bike that really does tick all my boxes, especially considering how long I plan on being stuck with the thing. Also, I'm 180+ lbs and fairly strong (for a beginner), so stiffness is something I actually notice in a bike, and is part of the reason I was excited to see thru axles start showing up on road bikes in the first place.

    edit: ok, let's be honest, I'm not strong, I'm just heavier and flex my bikes and wheels because I love cake and cupcakes and ice cream and brownies and tiramisu and creme brulee and cookies and chocolate milk
    I failed to mention that Specialized will be releasing more disc brake Tarmacs with the new frame design sometime early next year (probably January or February). Every indication is that they should have thru axles. They should be Fact 10 Carbon and S-Works level as well. Not sure about the price yet, but if it's similar to the rim brake version, it will probably start a little bit more than $4000.

    2018 Specialized Tarmac SL6 unveiled | Road Bike News, Reviews, and Photos
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Thanks for the replies, that's kind of what I was thinking. That price tag on the Specialized is so tempting, though! Like you said, I think I need to find a bike that really does tick all my boxes, especially considering how long I plan on being stuck with the thing. Also, I'm 180+ lbs and fairly strong (for a beginner), so stiffness is something I actually notice in a bike, and is part of the reason I was excited to see thru axles start showing up on road bikes in the first place.

    edit: ok, let's be honest, I'm not strong, I'm just heavier and flex my bikes and wheels because I love cake and cupcakes and ice cream and brownies and tiramisu and creme brulee and cookies and chocolate milk
    "I'm just here for the Ice Cream"...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Road = Flat mount. TA front and rear. 142mm rear spacing.

    Anything else is pre-standard adoption and should be avoided.
    This is correct. Post mount is the older method and on the way out.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  14. #14
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    I have a road bike that's both QR and post mount. No problems at all. I also have several thru-axle bikes and understand the small benefits of that system. However, it's not like QR / post mount is a huge functionality sacrifice.

  15. #15
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    probably the advantage of thru-axle matters more in the front than the back. it is the evolving standard though, and theoretically safer.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Thru-axles are better than QR for a disc brake bike for two reasons:

    1) First and foremost, braking forces on disc brakes put tremendous forces on your hubs. These forces can conceivably pull your wheel right out of your fork or stays.
    While theoretically possible, over 10 years of disc brake use on MTB's with open dropouts beg to differ. Yes, thru-axles are better, but we rode millions of very hard miles on MTB's with the "old" setup and minimal problems.

    Add to that, plenty of discs on early CX bikes with open dropouts as well. So there is plenty of history of that combo working fine.

    ASSUMING a person knows how to use a quick release properly, there is no problem with discs and open dropouts.

  17. #17
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    Don't let the Tarmac pricing draw you in - there are bound to be deals because the 2018 Tarmac disc is likely going to be a big upgrade on the current version. I spoke with a dealer who suspects they will catch up to the 12mm TA standard, have a significant weight drop, and also follow the Tarmac non-disc change to lowered seat stays for aero gains. I think if you buy the current version, you may be disappointed when you see one of the 2018s on the road.

    There's lots of debate about QR vs. TA on disc bikes, and peoples' experiences do differ. I had a Felt F5X cyclocross bike with QR Discs and while I never had trouble with brake useage, I did have a lot of brake rub that bothered me on at least 70% of my rides. I also test rode the 2017 Tarmac Disc Pro and had similar issues with brake rub. My impression is that the majority of people who have tried QR have experienced at least a little bit of brake rub from time-to-time because of the instability of QR. Whether or not that's bothersome on the road or a functional issue is more debatable, but IMO it's worth getting something with TAs for compatibility as well as to avoid brake rub/alignment issues.

    I was probably in a similar camp to you just a few months ago, looking for a "forever" road bike (which, in reality, probably doesn't REALLY exist) with discs. After a lot of searching and test riding, I ultimately pulled the trigger on a Giant TCR Advanced SL frameset and am doing a custom build with mechanical disc brakes (for ease of maintenance and because I never had issues with the feel/power on my CX bike) and combo Force/Red22 mechanical groupset for just over $5k. If you're purely focused on value for performance, Giant's lineup can't be beat. With that said, if money weren't a question, I'd probably have splurged on a custom build of the BMC Teammachine SLR01 disc or Cervelo R5 disc purely for the aesthetics and ethos of those bikes.

    In any case, with regards to the OP, would definitely get something with 12mm TA and otherwise, once you've picked your price point, just go with the machine that gives you the best feelz, cuz at the end of the day, it's really all about the feelz (and for me, the value and ability to build exactly what I want with the Giant gave me the most feelz, plus I actually like the green paintjob).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    I'm trying to buy a new road bike. I had basically decided on one of the new Cannondale Synapse bikes until they pulled their nice carbon bar and stem off of the model I was looking at and failed to adjust the price to make up for it. So, I'm back at square one looking at bikes. I found a 2018 Specialized Tarmac Comp Disc for $3000. It has their Fact 10r carbon frame, which is one step down from the S-Works level. Bike has Ultegra 8000 mechanical w/ hydro discs. They skimped a bit here and there to keep the cost down, most notably a non-S-Works fork.

    My main concern though is that almost every bike company out there is speccing their disc brake road bikes with thru axles and flat mount calipers. Specialized has this bike with standard quick release axles and post mount calipers. What gives? Is this something to be concerned about? Are there really any drawbacks to QR and posts versus thru axles and flat mounts?

    The bike looks good on paper, and the price is alluring, considering every other disc brake carbon bike w/ Ultegra 8000 is at least $1000 more. Whichever bike I buy is going to be my "forever" bike, at least the way my budget looks now. I'd obviously love to have a dedicated bike for each type of ride I could ever do, but I need the do-it-all classic road bike for right now, and I want to get a bike that I will love and enjoy for the next 10 years. I do have a budget for upgrades, most notably a power meter and a nice set of wheels, but the bike's gotta come first and I need to make a decision sooner rather than later.

    Other bikes I am looking at:

    Orbea Orca M20 Team-D $4500 (includes semi-custom paint)

    Trek Emonda SLR 6 Disc $5000

    BMC Team Machine SLR01 Disc Two $5200

    To be honest, for the price of some of these bikes versus the price of parts, I would be tempted to buy a frame and build it up myself to get exactly what I want. Yeah, it would be longer before I had a rideable bike, but it could be the bike I really want. Is it worth the hassle of trying to do that? I mean, we're talking like an additional 6-10 months of waiting on this thing. I'm very impatient.

    Although the two bikes you have mentioned are nice ones, they are totally different; how they ride, handle, geometry, etc.
    The 2018 Synapse is a great bike and I prefer the traditional stem and handlebar to their original design. Their higher end model does come with a carbon bar, but aluminum stem.

    If I were you, I'd decide on exactly what geometry you are looking for (relaxed, race oriented, etc.) and then look to models which have the specifics you are after. Buy the best or most enjoyable frame/ bike then upgrade over time. Remember approx. every 3 years Shimano changes their model line.

    Of note: Having a thru axle on the front does have it's benefits, but having a quick release on the rear has been very helpful on a number of bikes I have ridden such as a Cannonade Evo (most notably in races). Building a bike up is also a viable option, but typically much more expensive in the long run.

  19. #19
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    I'm on a 2017 Giant Defy 1. Love it. I looked at the SL 0 frameset, but went with the less expensive/heavier layup. Mostly because I'm quite tall and 230 lbs. The 16/24 spokes/SL everything. Is what pushed me away. Bike technology has come crazy far in the last 5 years, but I have been riding 30 plus years and just thought, not for me. Would I like a lighter bike? Absolutely, but I think I should lose some weight, then maybe. Don't know where you are on the size/weight scale, just my 02.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
    I have a road bike that's both QR and post mount. No problems at all. I also have several thru-axle bikes and understand the small benefits of that system. However, it's not like QR / post mount is a huge functionality sacrifice.
    I can see there is an advantage to TA vs. QR.

    I don't see the advantage (or disadvantage) of flat mount vs. post mount other than a minuscule amount of weight and flat mount looks a little neater.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post

    ASSUMING a person knows how to use a quick release properly
    , there is no problem with discs and open dropouts.
    This is key. I have been on club rides twice where someone had a QR come loose due to user error. Lawyer tabs saved the day in both cases. If they had been disc brake bikes, it could have been catastrophic.

    Not to mention that I can't count the number of times when I have helped someone change a flat where I found a QR with way insufficient tightness.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallboy1959 View Post
    I'm on a 2017 Giant Defy 1. Love it. I looked at the SL 0 frameset, but went with the less expensive/heavier layup. Mostly because I'm quite tall and 230 lbs. The 16/24 spokes/SL everything. Is what pushed me away. Bike technology has come crazy far in the last 5 years, but I have been riding 30 plus years and just thought, not for me. Would I like a lighter bike? Absolutely, but I think I should lose some weight, then maybe. Don't know where you are on the size/weight scale, just my 02.
    I definitely understand what you mean- I am only about 185ish lbs, but that is still heavy enough to be rough on a minimalist bike. If I were to get serious about riding and also be in the peak of race season, my weight would be more like 170-175. I'm just now getting back in shape but I'm not too far away from "good" shape should I try to achieve it.

    Unfortunately my bike search just took on a greater sense of urgency. While cleaning my bike last night, I noticed my frame had developed a large crack across the top tube, so my frame is basically toast. Mist of the bikes I was looking at won't be available until November or later, assuming I got one of the first shipment of bikes with the new Ultegra disc group. I didnt mind waiting when my bike was still good- I was just going to buy a trainer to use as the weather got colder than I like for outdoor rides. Now it's looking like I might be stuck on the trainer for the next three months!!

    My current bike choices are the Fuji SL Disc 1.3 with mechanical DuraAce for like $5000 from Performance or a BMC Teammachine SLR01 with mechanical Ultegra for $5300. BMC also has a SLR 02 version for $4000 but it weighs like 19 pounds! I can't see myself winning races in the mountains on a bike that will weigh close to 20 lbs one I get pedals and a blinky light and bottle cages etc...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    I definitely understand what you mean- I am only about 185ish lbs, but that is still heavy enough to be rough on a minimalist bike. If I were to get serious about riding and also be in the peak of race season, my weight would be more like 170-175. I'm just now getting back in shape but I'm not too far away from "good" shape should I try to achieve it.

    Unfortunately my bike search just took on a greater sense of urgency. While cleaning my bike last night, I noticed my frame had developed a large crack across the top tube, so my frame is basically toast. Mist of the bikes I was looking at won't be available until November or later, assuming I got one of the first shipment of bikes with the new Ultegra disc group. I didnt mind waiting when my bike was still good- I was just going to buy a trainer to use as the weather got colder than I like for outdoor rides. Now it's looking like I might be stuck on the trainer for the next three months!!

    My current bike choices are the Fuji SL Disc 1.3 with mechanical DuraAce for like $5000 from Performance or a BMC Teammachine SLR01 with mechanical Ultegra for $5300. BMC also has a SLR 02 version for $4000 but it weighs like 19 pounds! I can't see myself winning races in the mountains on a bike that will weigh close to 20 lbs one I get pedals and a blinky light and bottle cages etc...
    FWIW, I have actually seen the the Fuji on the scale and is pretty light for a disc bike. Easy to get and keep at 16-17 pounds or so IMO.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    This is key. I have been on club rides twice where someone had a QR come loose due to user error. Lawyer tabs saved the day in both cases. If they had been disc brake bikes, it could have been catastrophic.

    Not to mention that I can't count the number of times when I have helped someone change a flat where I found a QR with way insufficient tightness.
    Keep in mind that TA doesn't magically make this overall issue (dumb people) go away. The wheel might not be as likely to fall out once the axle is loose, but it can still slide out when not installed well.

    I have seen some overly complex axles and levers that are easier to screw up than an oldie QR.

    IMHO, the advantage in TA is the rigidity of the axle and dropouts.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    FWIW, I have actually seen the the Fuji on the scale and is pretty light for a disc bike. Easy to get and keep at 16-17 pounds or so IMO.
    Upon looking online today, Performance Bicycle is having another promotion of 30% store credit back on any bike purchase. This, combined with some 2017 models on sale, provides my budget some serious purchasing power. The sale is only good through Sept 4, so I've got to make some quick decisions. I'm good with getting a Fuji bike if it means making my dollar stretch this far, as opposed to the BMC I was looking at. Here is the rundown on models and pricing:

    My budget from now through next tax season is $5000

    2017 Fuji SL 2.1 Disc- $2600, Ultegra 6800 mechanical w/ hydro discs, heavier frame, I can buy a Wahoo New KICKR trainer and Quarq Dfour power meter and still have $700 left in my pocket. The salesman on the phone weighed this bike w/out pedals at 18.1 lbs. My current 2003 Cannondale CAAD7 w/ pedals and cages is 18.5 lbs.

    2017 Fuji SL 1.3 Disc- $4150, Dura Ace 9000 mechanical w/ hydro discs, light frame, I can buy a Wahoo New KICKR trainer and Quarq Dfour power meter and be $400 over budget.

    2018 Fuji SL 1.3 Disc- $5100, Dura Ace 9100 mechanical w/ hydro discs, light frame, probably not available until mid-November, and assuming I can catch another 30% credit promo, this bike with the trainer and power meter would put me at $750 over budget. This bike will probably weigh just under 16.5 lbs.

    The price of the 2.1 w/ Ultegra seems like a good value, especially considering I can buy two other high dollar items on my wish list and still be under budget. However, I can't help but wonder if the better frame of the other bikes would be worth the money in the long run, especially considering my goals of returning to racing and wanting to "win" organized century rides and gran fondos.

    As much as I LOVE the idea of the newest bike with the newest parts, I think maybe the 2017 SL 1.3 Disc would be the best compromise between staying on budget and getting top end parts in a timely manner. I do, after all, need a bike NOW if I want to ride any more on the road before Thanksgiving.

    Thoughts?

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