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  1. #1
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    Suggestions for replacing Klein Quantum Pro

    I've been riding my 2000 Klein QP for 17yrs. It has served me well and still looks nearly new. I've enjoyed the bike a lot. It climbs like a billy goat, descends well and doesn't punish me on the chatters. I also have a 1999 Quantum, which is my backup. Wheels on the QP are Velocity Aeroheads, 10 speed Chorus all around.

    I've had a couple other bikes including a Moots Vamoots which ended up being too small and a Calfee Tetra Pro (back in 2002), which just didn't do it for me. Ultimately, those bikes were sold relatively quickly and I ended up back on the Kleins.

    I'm 45 yo, 6'1" and 155lbs. I live in Maine and consider myself a decent recreational rider and like to ride pretty fast with the local club. On our thursday night rides, we avg ~21mph over 38mi and 1900ft climbing. When not riding with the club I'll go solo over a mix of smooth and pot hole infested roads. Anyways, getting the itch to possibly get into something newer. As much as I didn't "dig" the Calfee, I am somewhat partial to looking at cf again.

    I haven't followed trends in cycling for awhile and am trying to educate myself on all the newer equipment and frame materials. I can't believe the price of some the cf bikes these days. $12,000! That's nuts. Without getting into more detail, can some of you suggest some bike models and/or manufacturers that would compare comparably to my riding style and type of bike I currently own? I've looked at some of the Italian bikes like Colnago, Pinarello, etc as well as Specialized. One of the nice things I like about my Kleins are their uniqueness. I always get compliments as they are pretty rare nowadays. I'd like to get into something that not everyone has (sorry no Treks) so open to any suggestions. thanks.

  2. #2
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    That's kind of a broad question, so tough to answer. Since you mentioned that $12k shock, I assume price is a factor too. Many of the lower volume carbon builders will be very expensive but they won't be run of the mill frames, either.

    If you're only looking at carbon and still want that uniqueness, then try Calfee again or Parlee. I know there are other low volume custom or production carbon frames out there; I just don't keep track of the names.

    If you want uniqueness and you're willing to try steel, and price is a consideration, then I'd say get a Speedvagen Ready Made OG-1, frame or complete bike. There are MANY custom steel frames out there that would do the trick such as Waterford, Independent Fabrications, as well as some the smaller individual builders. I'll vouch for Rock Lobster which are incredibly affordable and highly regarded, and Soulcraft, with a headbadge which is as unique as they get. I should know as I have one!

    If you want to stick with aluminum and want uniqueness, there are a few custom builders out there that will keep the price down and give you that "cool" factor. Zanconato is one of them.

    Be more specific as to your needs, wants, a pricing and the forum can better steer you.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinMan View Post
    (sorry no Treks)
    haha, the irony...


    What about just going all spendy with new bits fancy blingy for the Kleins...
    All the gear and no idea

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    haha, the irony...


    What about just going all spendy with new bits fancy blingy for the Kleins...
    Thought about it, but I'm itching to just go new all around.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    "Break" one and see if Trek will still warranty it into a new frame...
    All the gear and no idea

  6. #6
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    Have a look at the Alan range of frames/bikes.

  7. #7
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    First off, I also have a similar Klein that will never get sold or stuffed in a corner.

    For similar ride experience it is really hard to go wrong with steel.

    For carbon, at least go test ride an S works or Expert Tarmac. I don't really like many carbon bikes either, but the specialized Does It for me.

    How about an aluminum Cannondale or Specialized depending on dealer and favorite color? I've ridden a few of various model years and think the newer ones lack the Klein's soul but will otherwise give it a run for it's money. Not exactly unique however.

    Maybe Crumpton for exotic carbon? Sounds like a fun hunt.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenR View Post
    First off, I also have a similar Klein that will never get sold or stuffed in a corner.

    For similar ride experience it is really hard to go wrong with steel.

    For carbon, at least go test ride an S works or Expert Tarmac. I don't really like many carbon bikes either, but the specialized Does It for me.

    How about an aluminum Cannondale or Specialized depending on dealer and favorite color? I've ridden a few of various model years and think the newer ones lack the Klein's soul but will otherwise give it a run for it's money. Not exactly unique however.

    Maybe Crumpton for exotic carbon? Sounds like a fun hunt.
    Thanks. Would also like to add colnago C60 and/or VR2 to to the mix, but budget can't justify the expense. Part of the issue is test riding these bikes as there are not many dealers and in some cases (colnago) none in Maine to test ride.

  9. #9
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    I remember when Klein's first started coming out in the early 80's. They were very cool but also very expensive. If you have a pre Trek Klein I can see why you want to keep it.

    As far as a replacement; I never got the whole "steel is real" thing and I've owned several steel bikes (Guerciotti, Rossin, Medici, Paramount OS). It's not like you are going to get on a steel bike, a white light will surround you, angels will sing and you will say "Oh my god, I have seen the light". No, that isn't going to happen. While my Paramount is a fun bike to ride; sadly it sits broken down and neglected. The frame needs to be sent back to Waterford to be repainted and needs to be rebuilt with modern components. If I were to get a steel bike I'd look at Independent Fab. Their frames are pretty reasonable.

    If you go with a aluminum, Zanconato is nice. I hoping to pick up a Cyfac Nerv DS2 with this years tax refund to replace my Abici. Gaulzetti's are very nice but a bit more expensive.

    Carbon fiber is a bit harder. I've ridden an Sworks Tarmac with electronic DA and hydraulic brakes. I came away less than impressed. That bike is seriously over hyped. I was even less impressed with the electronic shifting. Crumptons are very cool but how much money are you willing to shell out for a frame?

    Sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith. So far I can say that I have not made a bad choice. The last frame I bought (2013 Scapin) has turned out to be an excellent choice for my riding style. Every time I get on it; it just begs you to go harder, faster, longer. And, its not like I can walk into a LBS and test ride one. The same can be said for the Cyfac.

  10. #10
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    I have no affiliation. I have not ridden one. Can't speak to quality. But made in the US has piqued my interest. Not cheap, but different.

    https://alliedcycleworks.com/

  11. #11
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    The Quantum Pro rides super nice. Pristine ones occasionally popup on eBay. Keep yours in reserve. They seem pretty indestructible.

    Without a doubt, your cycling buddies can weigh in on this topic. If nothing else, you can spot the latest rides and ask them what they like or dislike about it. Guessing probably mostly carbon fiber rigs.

    I managed to find a hardly-used '15 C'Dale Supersix Evo (non hi mod) on craigslist for a nice price. Tweaked it a bit with componentry more to my liking, bringing it to just over 13 lbs soaking wet. Didn't soak me too bad, either - about $5k all told. It rides close to perfect, in my opinion. Blows the doors off my mid-nineties Merlin, which is still my sentimental favorite!

  12. #12
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    If you ever need it repainted, one of the former Klein painters has a side business of repainting them in the original colors. You can find him on the facebook group "Klein Bicycles Friends and Family".
    Last edited by bradkay; 1 Week Ago at 09:01 PM.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fast ferd View Post
    The Quantum Pro rides super nice. Pristine ones occasionally popup on eBay. Keep yours in reserve. They seem pretty indestructible.

    Without a doubt, your cycling buddies can weigh in on this topic. If nothing else, you can spot the latest rides and ask them what they like or dislike about it. Guessing probably mostly carbon fiber rigs.

    I managed to find a hardly-used '15 C'Dale Supersix Evo (non hi mod) on craigslist for a nice price. Tweaked it a bit with componentry more to my liking, bringing it to just over 13 lbs soaking wet. Didn't soak me too bad, either - about $5k all told. It rides close to perfect, in my opinion. Blows the doors off my mid-nineties Merlin, which is still my sentimental favorite!
    This is true although at times it can be a little chattery (probably mostly due to 700x 23 tires), but I'm not really sure going all carbon is going to make the ride "great". I guess in some ways I am trying to suggest to myself that my bike is old, outdated technology, when in fact it rides great, but I think I am missing out on something newer. Hard to describe. Maybe I should just admit I want something new in the stable Not interested in steal (had a Lemond at one time), done with Aluminum and probbaly Ti (not real fond of the look, leaving cf.
    Most of the models I've been loooking at are race frames. While I don't race I want something that "snaps" when I get out of the saddle, climbs with ease, but also is comfortable. Is it possible to get all of that in one? While my Klein provides most/all of that, I feel like I'm missing out on newer tech. FYI, also started looking at the colnago C59. A little older, but good reviews and less costly.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnardone View Post
    I have no affiliation. I have not ridden one. Can't speak to quality. But made in the US has piqued my interest. Not cheap, but different.

    https://alliedcycleworks.com/
    Sexy bikes, but I wonder about the longevity of some of these smaller companies.

  15. #15
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    "Most of the models I've been loooking at are race frames. While I don't race I want something that "snaps" when I get out of the saddle, climbs with ease, but also is comfortable. Is it possible to get all of that in one? While my Klein provides most/all of that, I feel like I'm missing out on newer tech. FYI, also started looking at the colnago C59. A little older, but good reviews and less costly."

    While I know that you said you are not interested in getting a Trek, at least take a look at how Trek has designed their carbon frames. Remember how Klein ovalized the down tube in a horizontal direction as it neared the bottom bracket? Trek has taken that idea of Gary's a step farther and made that portion of the down tube really wide, so their frames don't sway much when you stand up to attack (either a sprint or a climb). Look at them and then look at frames made by the other companies - maybe someone else is doing that. If so, that would be a bike to try at the very least.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinMan View Post
    Sexy bikes, but I wonder about the longevity of some of these smaller companies.
    And that is the real trick. Trying to figure out who is going to be around in 20 years. Never thought Medici would fold it's doors. I was worried about Paramount when Schwinn was in financial trouble. Now, they are Waterford. The guy that was Abici in San Diego was the victim of a hit and run; so he is no longer building. Landshark has been around for a good long while now. I remember when they started up back when I was racing. You could get one of their frames for $2-$250. All the Euro steel frames were going for $525-$575.

    Allied just started up. Their bikes look nice but have not ridden one.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnardone View Post
    I have no affiliation. I have not ridden one. Can't speak to quality. But made in the US has piqued my interest. Not cheap, but different.

    https://alliedcycleworks.com/
    B!tchin site. Love the way you can configure paint and components. Weight and price changes dynamically. Jacks the price up in a hurry! Mine got up to $8k!

    Some paint schemes look "Klein like," with both color and fade. The minimalist decals improves the look further, in my opinion. Wish they offered more wheel selections, if only to see where the weight might end up on a weight weenie project.

  18. #18
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    Tons of options out there, but if you're going carbon, you can get an off the shelf that will be an even match to custom. Custom carbon really doesn't you get you much (if any)advantages over off the shelf frames. With that said, it's a tough act to follow going from a Klein QP to a newer bike. It was, and still is, a great bike. Newer bike will give you the latest components, and a lot of lighter stuff, but whether it will be a better bike is purely subjective. It depends on what you like. Good luck.

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