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  1. #1
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    Touring on a road/ race bike?

    I have a Dean El-Diente Road bike. I plan to go on a 3 day 'tour' with some friends. This would mean retrofitting my frame with clamps to accept a pack for the rear (no current eyelets). My bud is adamant that I NOT use the Dean, that it is a road/race bike and will not do well ladened with a pack. "The tires are too thin, the frame is too short, blah, blah, blah". It's only 3 days (alright, 50-60 miles a day with climbing on the East coast), but I cannot afford a new frame, and if I borrow one, I am sure it will not fit as my frame does to me.
    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Man, I'm Awesome
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    You can make it work. Just get your buddies to carry everything. Lol.

    If you can fit some 28mm tires that would help.

    How much gear are you taking?
    "I like to ride my bicycle." - Lance Armstrong -

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianmcg View Post
    You can make it work. Just get your buddies to carry everything. Lol.

    If you can fit some 28mm tires that would help.

    How much gear are you taking?
    Not much gear...two overnites in Inns...clothing and wash-up gear. I can keep it fairly light.

  4. #4
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    Are we talking self-supported loaded touring with a lot of weight?

    How tight is the geometry on the Dean?

    I have done light touring on a couple of different bikes using a trunk rack (seatpost clamp) with side bags, and handlebar bag(s). To stay roadworthy, I put on a heavier/slightly wider Schwalbe touring tire (28s?). Added race blade fenders.

    This worked fine, but I wouldn't want to set out across country with it.

    For three days/not too much weight I think it would be fine.
    "When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking."

    (Sir) Arthur Conan Doyle. Scientific American, January 18, 1896

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aseglin View Post
    Not much gear...two overnites in Inns...clothing and wash-up gear. I can keep it fairly light.
    You should be fine with that little. The touring guys coached me on washing shorts and jersey at the same time you shower, and they are usually dry by next morning--so take the ones you are wearing. It's summer so a pair of shorts, flip flops etc will all fit comfortably in the seatpost mount trunk rack (look at Topeak).
    "When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking."

    (Sir) Arthur Conan Doyle. Scientific American, January 18, 1896

  6. #6
    Matnlely Dregaend
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    There are few good substitutes for a touring frame. The closest you can get is a cross frame which at least lets you mount fenders. Your friend is right a road bike won't do well weighed down with packs. Get a front basket and travel REALLY light?
    "I haven't @#&$ed like that since I was an altar boy." Hank Moody
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” Susan B. Anthony 1896
    "Brifter" is the coolest cycling word

  7. #7
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    One of the guys in my club just finished a 40 day self supported tour across the US on his Trek road bike. I think the model is the 5200. He had front and rear panniers carrying 40lbs of gear. I asked him if he thought he needed sturdier wheels and he said no. He only weighs about 115lbs and with the additional weight still doesn't weigh as much as me.

  8. #8
    wim
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    I don't see a problem at all. Your friend is taking this bike choice thing too seriously. He's looking at this 3-day motel tour like one would look at a self-supported cross-country tour. There's a huge difference.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aseglin View Post
    I have a Dean El-Diente Road bike. I plan to go on a 3 day 'tour' with some friends. This would mean retrofitting my frame with clamps to accept a pack for the rear (no current eyelets). My bud is adamant that I NOT use the Dean, that it is a road/race bike and will not do well ladened with a pack. "The tires are too thin, the frame is too short, blah, blah, blah". It's only 3 days (alright, 50-60 miles a day with climbing on the East coast), but I cannot afford a new frame, and if I borrow one, I am sure it will not fit as my frame does to me.
    Any thoughts?
    Here's a picture of me in Hungary--wearing a really ugly jersey (also white and fat) with the Topeak seatpost attached trunk rack and bag/handlebar bag on my Mercian. Our luggage was being schlepped, but we were riding on pretty empty roads so we were packing quite a bit on a daily basis. The tires were Schwalbe Marathons--25s and I did not puncture in two weeks ot riding on some pretty crappy roads including sections of gravel.

    I would suggest front and back bags just to spread the load a little--the hb bags are not as good as lowrider panniers, but for some light things they work pretty good.
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    "When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking."

    (Sir) Arthur Conan Doyle. Scientific American, January 18, 1896

  10. #10
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    For a 3-day tour with a relatively light load, you should be fine. I would recommend a large Carradice seat bag rather than retrofitting a rack and panniers. A Carradice bag should hold all the gear you need, and will center the weight much better than a rack w/ panniers. I would recommend a Carradice Bagman or similar seat rack to support the bag and keep it from swaying and hitting your legs when pedaling. I have used a Carradice bag for commuting for more than 5 years and you hardly know it's there. Mine is the smallest model, the Barley, and it holds everything I need 99% of the time. However, you might want one of the larger models such as the Pendle or Low-saddle Longflap for a 3-day tour. You can buy Carradice bags for much less money with better selection if you order from British on-line bike shops such as Wiggle, SJS Cycles or direct from Carradice.
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  11. #11
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2 View Post
    I would recommend a large Carradice seat bag rather than retrofitting a rack and panniers. A Carradice bag should hold all the gear you need, and will center the weight much better than a rack w/ panniers.
    Heartily agree. There's this notion out there that you need to pack stuff as low to the ground as possible for a touring bike to handle well. This is not true. Don't want to to start a physics discussion here, but if "low to the ground" would translate into handling well, recumbents would be the handling champions of the bike world. They're not.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aseglin View Post
    I have a Dean El-Diente Road bike. I plan to go on a 3 day 'tour' with some friends. This would mean retrofitting my frame with clamps to accept a pack for the rear (no current eyelets). My bud is adamant that I NOT use the Dean, that it is a road/race bike and will not do well ladened with a pack. "The tires are too thin, the frame is too short, blah, blah, blah". It's only 3 days (alright, 50-60 miles a day with climbing on the East coast), but I cannot afford a new frame, and if I borrow one, I am sure it will not fit as my frame does to me.
    Any thoughts?
    50-60 miles a day is not much riding; no different than a club ride. So if you feel comfortable with the bike's contact point geometry and saddle I dont see a problem.

    What I may have done if I was in your predicament would be to use a stout wheelset; a 23mm rim, if you happen to have one, with 25mm or 28mm tires if they clear your chainstays could give you a cushy ride properly inflated. I would also pay more attention to the spokes; you need enough so if you happen to break one you can still ride the bike, this means no 16/20 and preferably 32/32 or 32/36

  13. #13
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    Ummm... Ship your clothes and travel size toiletries to each Inn, call them and ask them to hold for you and slip them a $20 (plus shipping cost) to ship anything back to you that doesn't fit in your jersey pockets?
    "Five and Dime, all the time!"

  14. #14
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    This might be an ignorant question; but since his ride is only 180 miles max, why not just wear a light backpack?

    I wear one for my daily commute 34 miles a day, and it's a lot more convenient to me than dealing with racks and panniers. I manage to carry work clothes, clean towel, etc. in a small bag, which is probably as much as you need for a couple nights on the road.

    If its a style thing, then I understand.

  15. #15
    Decrepit Member
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    I use a rear rack with panniers on my road bike for credit card touring. Looking at the position of the Carradice seat bag, I'm not sure there's a significant difference in fore-and-aft weight distribution between the Carradice bag and the panniers.

    Personally, I wouldn't even consider carrying enough stuff in a backpack for a three day ride; for me it would just be too heavy and restrictive.

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  16. #16
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    BOB is your friend.

  17. #17
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    You'll be fine. And +1 on BOB, though its overkill for a 3 day credit card tour.
    Life is better in the big ring.

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  18. #18
    39x21
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    If you are considering using a rack/panniers combo, just make sure you have enough heel clearance before you commit to the setup. From past experience, big feet + tight race geometry + panniers = insufficient clearance.
    dulce et decorum est pro velo mori

  19. #19
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    +1 for the back pack. If you're staying in inns, then you don't need much, and you don't need to stock up on food.

    All I would put in there is some first aide, a few spare tubes/spokes/tools, a flashlight, you know, the basics, and maybe, MAYBE one change of clothes and rain gear. We're talking under 20 pounds.

    I mean, arguably, you could do this tour with nothing more than the clothes on your back, weather permitting. I wouldn't recommend it, but just pack light.

    If you can be bothered with the rack, go for it, but as with any tour, bring spare bolts. You'd be surprised how hard it is to find good hardware sometimes.

  20. #20
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    Not to pile on your friend, but 180 miles in 3 days while not carrying your shelter, food or cooking supplies really isn't a big deal. It could be very fun, but it can easily be done on a race bike. A seatpost mounted rack can be had for as little as $20-30. If it is in your budget the Carradice is even cooler. Get one, load it up and have fun.

  21. #21
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    Heck yeah it can be done. I have been reading this guys journal for about a month now.
    Check out his set up.

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p...id=279737&v=F7

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