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Thread: Vintage Trek

  1. #1
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    Vintage Trek

    I have an old Trek frame and wonder how hard it would be to find original parts for it, and how expensive. I haven't ridden it for years and am not sure it's worth it to me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Trek-img_20171113_212418338.jpg  

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    Great looking frame and certainly an excellent starting point for someone wanting to build up a nice project bike.

    The first question is…does this frame fit you? This can be difficult to tell if you don’t have wheels, handle bars, a seat and post etc. on there to determine how it fits, but perhaps you can compare the measurements to another road bike that does fit you.
    Do you have a readable serial number on the frame? If so try vintage treks to determine the year:
    http://www.vintage-trek.com/SerialNumbers.htm
    They also have great brochures and spec sheets to help determine the components that came on this bike.
    http://www.vintage-trek.com/TrekBrochures.htm
    As far as if it’s worth it to you, it certainly all depends and how much it will cost to get original parts for it in your area or online (Craig’s List can be a good local resource). It also depends on how picky you are at getting exactly what the bike came with or how willing you are to use parts that may have been put on bikes a bit before or after this particular year.
    I’d assume just by glancing at some photos that the bike is late-ish 80’s meaning it likely had 700c wheels to begin with so that should make things a bit easier. There are also plenty of used parts on e-bay for reasonable prices that would fit well on this bike and could make it an amazing retro-ride (Shimano 105 or 600 series etc.). If you’d like, you could also go retro modern and use some more modern components on this bike and it would still function well, ride great, and look nice too.

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    I used to ride this bike. It fit OK, but at 60cm with, I think, a custom long top tube, it was a bit big. It originally had all campy when my friend bought it originally, but over time I couldn't afford that, and as things wore out I used Shimano parts. I still have record or super record crankset. It was all top of the line at one point.

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    Sounds like the OP has owned this bike for some time. What's the background? Did you buy the frame and never build it up, or did you own the bike built up? Give us a little back ground. Some of the frames Trek made long ago were really nice, others not so much.

    As far as finding old parts -- they exist and if you like scouring ebay over time, I'm sure you'll find what you're looking for -- once you know what that is. I suppose that could be fun. However, being someone who has ridden old parts because he's old (e.g., index shifting -- how cool), I can tell you that the new stuff works better. An old frame can look good with modern equipment.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Trek-img_0298.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I can tell you that the new stuff works better. An old frame can look good with modern equipment.
    I agree and if the frame fits well enough and is of sufficient quality it could certainly ride and look great with a modern (upgraded) touch. I did the same on my 1990 Giant Cadex as it originally had a threaded alloy fork, quill stem, and downtube index Shimano 105 shifters.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Trek-upgraded-giant.jpg  
    Last edited by Veloptuous; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:41 AM. Reason: fix informaion

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    A friend was working in a bike shop mid 80's. He got this bike for at least $2000, maybe with a discount. He owed a mutual friend money and gave him the bike. This guy sold it to me in '92 for $1200... already with some parts changed out to more modern components. The down tube cracked on me and Trek fixed it and repainted it. Decals and original Trek symbols were no longer available, so it doesn't look original. Still looks pretty classic, though.Vintage Trek-img_20171113_212813924.jpg

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    What components do you still have for the bike? You mentioned the Campy crank….anything else like wheels? You could just re-install anything you have that fits, source the rest online or at the LBS, and get it back on the road sooner rather than later if you so desire.

    On another note...I'm glad to hear that Trek fixed the frame for you. My father bought an old used Bianchi frame many years ago and built up a bike. On a ride he cracked one of the head tube lugs and Bianchi ended up giving him an entire new frame and took the old one back. It worked out well in the end.
    Last edited by Veloptuous; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:02 AM. Reason: Adding information

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    Looks great

    Quote Originally Posted by Veloptuous View Post
    I agree and if the frame fits well enough and is of sufficient quality it could certainly ride and look great with a modern (upgraded) touch. I did the same on my 1990 Giant Cadex as it originally had a threaded alloy fork, quill stem, and downtube index Shimano 105 shifters.
    So you needed a new fork?

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    I like it!

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    I have stem and bars, brake levers and brakes. I need wheels. But what I have is kind of a Mish mash, but it would get it going, I suppose. I mean with some additions. I met a Shimano rep in the mountains of Japan. He was testing brakes and he demonstrated how much better Shimano was than my old campy brakes, so I wasnt that interested in preserving and holding onto stuff like that.

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    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kahl View Post
    I have stem and bars, brake levers and brakes. I need wheels. But what I have is kind of a Mish mash, but it would get it going, I suppose. I mean with some additions. I met a Shimano rep in the mountains of Japan. He was testing brakes and he demonstrated how much better Shimano was than my old campy brakes, so I wasnt that interested in preserving and holding onto stuff like that.
    Yeah, but if they're Campy Delta brakes, the coolness overrides the functionality.

    Plus, what would you expect a Shimano rep to tell you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kahl View Post
    I used to ride this bike. It fit OK, but at 60cm with, I think, a custom long top tube, it was a bit big. It originally had all campy when my friend bought it originally, but over time I couldn't afford that, and as things wore out I used Shimano parts. I still have record or super record crankset. It was all top of the line at one point.
    IMHO, if the bike doesn't fit right, I wouldn't put a lot into it. Yes, vintage bikes are nice, but you could certainly find a vintage bike on eBay or Craigslist that fits you better, then sell this one unless you need a livingroom ornament or just can't emotionally part with it.
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    It’s really just a matter of perspective I suppose. Sometimes it’s nice to have things match up well. Like an entire matching group-set and all that, and then it’s just nice to get out and ride and not worry about having a mix of different stuff on a bike as long as it’s functional. In some cases (and this is really just my opinion) it’s cool just to have stuff all mixed up…just throwing together components on a frame (Campy, Dia Comp, Shimano, whatever)
    I have a Japanese Tang Infinity Frame with all matching late 80’s early 90’s 105s (brakes, levers, DT shifters, derailleurs, and hubs. The Seat post, Quill stem and handlebars are all matching too (Nitto). So it’s all nice and clean and period I suppose. Then I have a ‘70s random European made steel frame that has random parts and bits from various other bikes put on it (Old Dia Comp brakes, Weinnman non-aero levers, some random seat post I had laying around, a ripped Avocet saddle, 80’s era Sungio crank, and SS/Fixed wheels off a newer Specialized) and it’s cool in its own special way.


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    Well, it was a 20% grade and he had total control with two fingers and I was holding on for dear life!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kahl View Post
    A friend was working in a bike shop mid 80's. He got this bike for at least $2000, maybe with a discount. He owed a mutual friend money and gave him the bike. This guy sold it to me in '92 for $1200... already with some parts changed out to more modern components. The down tube cracked on me and Trek fixed it and repainted it. Decals and original Trek symbols were no longer available, so it doesn't look original. Still looks pretty classic, though.Click image for larger version. 

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    For what it's worth, those graphics are late 80's graphics.

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    I thought they had that look. The other things (face plate?) and frame size have more of a 90's look, I think.Vintage Trek-img_20171113_212625963.jpg

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    Vintage Trek-img_20171113_212519856.jpg

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    hfc
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    THe 80’s steel Treks are well respected. You can shop eBay or your local CL for 7 speed Shimano 600 or Dura Ace parts. The rear spacing on that frame will be 126 mm. 8 ,9 and 10 speeds can go on it, but you will have to spread the stays a little to get the rear wheel on. That being said I have 8 speed on a couple of 126 mm frames without problems.

    Older Shimano stuff isn’t usually too expensive. Here are some bits at a good price (not mine):

    https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ters-hubs.html

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    How do you measure? I have what I think are the original cogs for the rear wheel...six cogs, I think 12 through 17 or 18 (very tight gearing).

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    It would be really cool to put it back together the way it's supposed to be, but then the pInt and graphics aren't right anyway, and I'd have something I'd be afraid to ride maybe.

  21. #21
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    Instead of trying to make it 'original', perhaps you should try going more 'resto-mod', like I did with my 1978 Trek 710:
    Attachment 321144
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Trek-20170826_162755.jpg  
    Last edited by No Time Toulouse; 4 Weeks Ago at 02:53 PM. Reason: added pic directly
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    Unfortunately I couldn't see your bike...bad link? But yes, it might not have to be original.

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    So I looked it up. It's a Trek 170, with serial number from 1/31/1984. Also stamped on the bottom bracket is 60TSI.

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    So that explains the Campy components you had on that bike. Now going back to your original question regarding what it would take to put original parts on this frame (and it sounds like you have some already?) But the rest you’d have to source and some vintage Campy stuff can be pricy or scarce for sure. But either way it seems as though the frame is of good quality and either way you go…Campy, Shimano, or some other mix would be just fine depending on your preference.
    As far as rear spacing is concerned a lot depends on the particular frame and the wheels. For sure it was originally 126mm given the vintage. As stated before that can easily be spread (or cold set) to accommodate a 130mm modern wheel (8-10) speed. And just like hfc I’ve been able to get an 8 cog cassette on a wheel spaced at 126mm. I’ve also placed modern 130mm wheel into a 126mm CF frame with no need to spread the stays. Other 130mm wheels would not even come close to fitting….so much of it really depends on a lot of factors and the tolerance of the components.


  25. #25
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    vintage campy can be pricey, but winter is definitely the season to buy if you're in the market.

    i've done it many times. the least expensive way is to find a donor bike with most of the components you want and a frame you can sell or build up into something marketable. donors are usually the least expensive on craigslist (vs ebay).

    if looking for shiny stuff with the original anodization, you will pay out the arse. if you can deanodize and polish stuff yourself like i do, you can get away on the cheap.

    my last build was a year ago when i refurbished a '60 paramount frameset with a mix of gran sport, record and super record. it's not perfectly period-correct, but it looks pretty bad ass and functions perfectly. it cost me about $700 or so, and includes new rims built up on vintage campy hubs.

    if you really know how to shop, you can find some deals, like the super record chainrings i found on ebay connected to an orphan sugino crank arm.

    as you can tell, i prefer "refurbishing" rather than "restoring," as i'm not limited to original equipment and can build it the way my budget allows.
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