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  1. #1
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    What to look for in a carbon frame that has been repaired

    So I have been looking at some used carbon frames to use on a project bike. There are a bunch of these frames that have repairs. Obviously I can buy a pristine frame for more $, but are these repaired frames still usable?

    Now I know that the answer to that questions depends on what the damage was, how the repair was done, and who did the repair.

    And Iím not looking at any bikes that have serious damage. Its mostly seatstay, or chainstay damage.

    Would you guys consider a frame with a carbon repair? How would you go about inspecting it to make sure itís roadworthy?

    For instance, I am looking a 2015 Cervelo R3 frame/fork with a chainstay repair. I know approx what the going rate is. How much does the repair knock off the price?

  2. #2
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    No, i would not buy a used carbon bike to ride on the road.

    Maybe, i would buy a used carbon bike for trainer use only. And only if i paid next to nothing for it.

    If you finances don't allow purchasing a new carbon frame, buy a used or new metal framed bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post

    For instance, I am looking a 2015 Cervelo R3 frame/fork with a chainstay repair. I know approx what the going rate is. How much does the repair knock off the price?
    It knocks everything off the price, IMO.

    The chainstay got cracked somehow, was it a crash ?. Do you know and/or can you determine the reason for the fix with 100% assurance ?. Possibly a crash and they fixed what was obvious and at that point could they determine if there was any other issues ?. Carbon does a very good job of hiding problems.

    Unless the company doing the repair is offering at least a 1 or 2 year warranty, I'd pass and get a less expensive new frame.

  4. #4
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    I get it. The R3 is a nice frame, but repaired carbon is just like a hemorrhoid; it'll be a pain in the ass at some point. 600 bucks will get you a Nashbar frameset without logos: Nashbar Carbon Road Frame and Fork - Nashbar
    Wake me up when it's alarm green.

  5. #5
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    What I'd look for is good health insurance.

    Carbon repair is no big deal and there's not reason to not trust it (assuming a competent qualified person did it). But if the repair was need due to a crash how do you know there isn't other damage that wasn't detectable? Or if it was needed because it 'just happened' that's a pretty good indication the frame sucks and will eventually die in another spot.

  6. #6
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    I have repaired a couple of frames that had chainstay damage. I picked them up cheap before they were repaired or painted over. Being a cahinstay it depends on where the damage is but if it's chainsuck or gravel rash then I would (a) buy it cheap (b) have no hesitation riding it as the repair is generally cosmetic and not structural. . BUT, if you are buying a repaired frame, unless it was repaired by a trusted person I would be reluctant to sink much cash into it. Professionally repaired by the likes of Calfee et. al. again no problem. Then again if a chainstay fails all that will likely happen is you'll screw up your wheel drive chain and land on your arse.

  7. #7
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    All good points guys. I guess it is too risky to get a repaired carbon frame, but how about a clean used one? Bikes and bike parts have such poor resale value. If I could pick up a frame that is a year or two old, I wouldn't have to take such a big hit on it.

    Or I could keep an eye out for a new leftover frame from last year or the year before. I like my Fuji SL, and wouldn't mind a newer frame.

  8. #8
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    I took a look at that Nashbar frameset. I like it. The reviews are good, and a few guys mentioned it weighing in around 16.5 lbs with an Ultegra setup.

    Do they make their own frames at Nashbar, or is it basically an open mold Chinese frame that has had a little more QC inspection?

  9. #9
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    If I was selling a frame that was properly repaired, it would work and look so good that it wouldn't be obvious it had ever been damaged.

    Where does one find "repaired" carbon frames that are advertised that way or look like they have been?
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Where does one find "repaired" carbon frames that are advertised that way or look like they have been?
    Ebay. There are some sellers that seem to just sell broken or repaired carbon frames.

    Some of them have obvious repairs, like not painted to match. Others are like you said, repaired well enough that I canít tell from the pics. But they are still described as repaired. Makes me wonder how many have been repaired and not described as such.

    Not that I am planning to buy a frame from ebay, but it gives me an idea how much some of these frames are selling for.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    Would you guys consider a frame with a carbon repair?
    From the OEM, with a full warranty, maybe. If I were in the market and the price was great.

    From anyone else, no.
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  12. #12
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    Would you guys consider a frame with a carbon repair?
    I've had a few friends who've had carbon repairs done, from mild to severe, done at reputable repair companies. They've all been riding their frames for a year or more. I'd buy a frame from them.

    Otherwise, nope. No way.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  13. #13
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    Hey, not trying to threadjack my own thread, but what do you guys think about the frame sizes on the Nashbar frame? Usually I ride a 56 or 58cm. When I was looking at the Nashbar frame chart, I assumed I would ride either the 55 or 58cm.

    I know the size for those are based on seattube length, but I usually look at top tube length. The 55cm bike has a 57cm top tube, and the 58cm bike has a 59cm top tube. Honesty I want something a little shorter than my current bike (it has a 57.5cm top tube, and a 58cm seat tube). I guess that would put me on the Nashbar 52cm size frame. It has a 55cm top tube.

    I mean, I can always jack the seatpost up to make up for the shorter seat tube right? I just want something with a little shorter top tube that I can put a longer stem on.

  14. #14
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    So, what I have gathered from this thread, is if the repair was done at a reputable place, and the price is right, there is no problem with buying that frame. Iíll stay clear of the DIY or unknown repairs

  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    So, what I have gathered from this thread, is if the repair was done at a reputable place, and the price is right, there is no problem with buying that frame.
    No, that's not what you should have gathered.
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  16. #16
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    Seems there are a few guys who wouldn't touch a repaired frame, a few guys that wonít even buy a clean used carbon frame, and a few who would trust a good repair from a known reputable repair shop/or from the OEM. Is there something I am missing?

    tig: I know you also mentioned the time ridden after the repair. I can see how that could also be important

  17. #17
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    I would not buy a used carbon bike.

    I would not buy a carbon bike that had been repaired.

    Period.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    Or I could keep an eye out for a new leftover frame from last year or the year before. I like my Fuji SL, and wouldn't mind a newer frame.
    This is what I would do if I were you. Visit a few bike shops and see what kind of new/old stock they have. Bikes depreciate quickly and shops want to get rid of older inventory.

    EBay is generally a success for sellers, not a bargain for buyers.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    Hey, not trying to threadjack my own thread, but what do you guys think about the frame sizes on the Nashbar frame? Usually I ride a 56 or 58cm. When I was looking at the Nashbar frame chart, I assumed I would ride either the 55 or 58cm.

    I know the size for those are based on seattube length, but I usually look at top tube length. The 55cm bike has a 57cm top tube, and the 58cm bike has a 59cm top tube. Honesty I want something a little shorter than my current bike (it has a 57.5cm top tube, and a 58cm seat tube). I guess that would put me on the Nashbar 52cm size frame. It has a 55cm top tube.

    I mean, I can always jack the seatpost up to make up for the shorter seat tube right? I just want something with a little shorter top tube that I can put a longer stem on.
    The Nashbar carbon comes in 55 and 57 effective top tubes. Most frames also show the actual top tube size, but that can vary depending on the angle of the TT, so ETT is the key measurement. If you were riding a 57.5 ETT frame, moving to a 55 is a huge jump and I donít think changing the stem would help. Moving down one size might see you on a 56 ETT frame and Iíd look for that.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    The Nashbar carbon comes in 55 and 57 effective top tubes. Most frames also show the actual top tube size, but that can vary depending on the angle of the TT, so ETT is the key measurement. If you were riding a 57.5 ETT frame, moving to a 55 is a huge jump and I donít think changing the stem would help. Moving down one size might see you on a 56 ETT frame and Iíd look for that.
    I would like to find a 56cm top tube frame. I have ridden a few 55/56cm bikes and am very comfortable on them. My 58cm bike originally came with a 90mm stem and I was comfortable with that. I changed to a 110 stem because I like the way it handles better.

    The longer bike/stem makes me stretch out more and get lower, but I wouldn't mind a more upright position. I think there is only so much you can do with a shorter stem and zero setback seatpost before you should just get a smaller frame size.

    So maybe the Nashbar 55cm frame (57cm top tube) is closer to what I need.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    I would like to find a 56cm top tube frame. I have ridden a few 55/56cm bikes and am very comfortable on them. My 58cm bike originally came with a 90mm stem and I was comfortable with that. I changed to a 110 stem because I like the way it handles better.

    The longer bike/stem makes me stretch out more and get lower, but I wouldn't mind a more upright position. I think there is only so much you can do with a shorter stem and zero setback seatpost before you should just get a smaller frame size.

    So maybe the Nashbar 55cm frame (57cm top tube) is closer to what I need.
    https://www.adrenalinebikes.com/stor...oductid=188918

  22. #22
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    That Felt looks sweet. I think its worth the extra money over the Nashbar frame. Looks like the Felt would be around 770$ including shipping.

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