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  1. #1
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    What would you do?

    Currently ride a 25 year old Klein Quantum with Ultegra 6800 and flo 30s and am looking to upgrade. Would you buy a frameset and move the components over or would you buy a brand new thru axle disc brake bike with all new components and sell off what you could?

    Frameset options narrowed down to a Foundry Chilkoot

    New bike option narrowed down to a Giant Defy advanced sl or advanced pro, argument between these two models is my next forum topic if I go this route, so feel free to jump on this question now too.

  2. #2
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    Depends on how hard you ride, I suppose. I can't imagine, however, that twenty-five year-old components work too well and, honestly, components have improved appreciably in the last two decades. Frames, however, have not - at least not for your average rider.

    Still though, there's nothing quite like a completely new bicycle to take out riding. Personally, I'd just start from scratch.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waspinator View Post
    I can't imagine, however, that twenty-five year-old components work too well...
    OP is using Ultegra 6800, an 11-speed group, which is not 25 years old.

    my DA-8 SIS equipped bike is 25 years old and works perfectly.
    the 45th POTUS is inept, corrupt, and a pathological liar. and those may be his better qualities...

  4. #4
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    It's clear you don't understand how to fit a bike.

    Your two options are crazy far apart.

    Defy: 567/377 or 605/390

    Chilkoot: 560/394 or 588/404

    I think first you need to figure out your fit and your frame stack and reach numbers. After that you can start to consider bikes.
    use a torque wrench

  5. #5
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    I would go with a new bike. I like having bike that have different riding characteristics. Frames have changed greatly over the years. My 83 chanondale in storage rides nothing like a modern canondale. My Kestral 4000, also in storage rides nothing like a modern carbon frame. My Colombia slx frame and Reynolds 531 frame are closer to a 853 frame, except the 853 frame is much lighter

  6. #6
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    If the question is about bikes, the answer is always get another bike. Other poster dissed 25 year old components but Ultegra 6800 would only be about 15 years old I guess. Either way I have several bikes with groups ranging from 1983 through mid 90's so if working fine no need to toss.

    A spare bike is always good to have, the old bike could always be a rain bike, back up if you find a flat or other problem right before heading out for a ride, etc. I'm a bit of a retro grouch so I'm not a fan of disc brakes, thru axle and what not but if it makes you happy, then go for it. I think there is great value in buying a quality used bike, rather than new.

  7. #7
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    Ultegra 6800 would only be 4 years-old. The two options listed, as already mentioned, are nothing alike. Looking at the Chilkoot in a 54cm because that's about my size, it's extremely long/low at 541mm stack and 390mm reach. That is racier than most 54cm bikes being used in the TdF. Only the Argon 18 Gallium Pro and Trek Emonda SLR in H1 fit are even longer/lower.

    The Defy is at the extreme end of "endurance" geometry. The equivalent Defy for me would have a 567mm stack and 377mm reach. Way too tall and way too short for my tastes. In order to get 390mm in reach with a Defy, that requires a frame with a 606mm stack...

    Go see a Retul fitter and come back with the results. Also show a profile photo of your Quantum with all contact points visible...I'm curious.

  8. #8
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    Ultegra 6800 is modern. Assuming you are happy with the wheels, its a no -brainer. Buy a new frame and move stuff over

  9. #9
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    What do you want to "upgrade"? Until you figure out what you want to improve you should use the term "get new stuff for no apparent reason". When you figure out what needs/wants to be upgraded you'll have your answer.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    Ultegra 6800 is modern. Assuming you are happy with the wheels, its a no -brainer. Buy a new frame and move stuff over
    That's the sort of unambiguous answer I was looking for. The only discussion is really if disc brake road bikes are something that cannot be passed up, which I really don't think they are as awesome as manufacturers are making them out to be..

  11. #11
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    The frame needs replacing, 6800 is an excellent groupset and whatever bike I buy new would have the same drivetrain, but if disc brakes were worth the leap it is a good time to consider moving over to the them.

  12. #12
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    My bike fits are funky but manageable on endurance bikes, I had an bianchi infinito cv (until it was taken out by a car) that I slammed the stem on with a -17* stem to get the fit I wanted, a defy would be a similar setup. Chilkoot will admittedly need about 20mm of spacers and a 10* stem on it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    That's the sort of unambiguous answer I was looking for. The only discussion is really if disc brake road bikes are something that cannot be passed up, which I really don't think they are as awesome as manufacturers are making them out to be..
    once you decide disc you can't use the wheels or group set for the most part. which negates your whole question. decide what you want the bike to do before asking people if you should keep the components or "upgrade" everything. the question about disc now makes me think you don't know what your goal here is.

  14. #14
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    I don't think it negates the question at all, it's just asking for an opinion... It may not make sense as to why I came to the conclusion for these two but I'll try to explain myself quick.

    1) I ride ~15 hours a week, ~10 of them on the road so comfort on the bike is a must (lends itself to titanium or an 'endurance' frame)

    2) I'm not a huge fan of bikes with a wheelbase less than 1010 just as they seem a little too twitchy on descents for my liking (I'm 6'3'' and generally am stuck between 58 and 60 sizes), the Chilkoot squeaks by in an XL without it being to long like many 'race' frames in my size

    3) I ride longer cranks (previous roadies have 177.5 and 180) and hate clipping pedals so I prefer a bb drop <70mm for peace of mind, this throws out almost every endurance frame out except the defy which is a rare 65mm bb drop and the chilkoot by comparison has a 68mm bb drop..

    The only other competitor I could really find was the Infinito CV which I used to own but I am a bit superstitious enough that I don't want to chance it again (getting taken out hard by a car and breaking a hip isn't something I'd want to chance again).

    4) both not important but also most important: I find these two (while they are radically different in terms of styling) super cool looking and something I'd never regret having to grab on the way out the door..

  15. #15
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    Still not clear to me but I suppose that doesn't matter.

    When factor in labor if you don't do your own work, the sum of the parts generally being more than the whole, and compatibility issues I think a new bike makes more sense. And of course by getting a new bike you will then have two bikes instead of one.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    The only discussion is really if disc brake road bikes are something that cannot be passed up, which I really don't think they are as awesome as manufacturers are making them out to be..
    You are correct here. Shimano rim brakes have better modulation than ever that they are just as good as disc brakes. The only time I would recommend you definitely get disc brakes is if you ride in rain and wet roads a lot.

    Lots of disc vs. rim brake debates on these forums. They both have their pros and cons. To say one is far better than the other would be wrong except as I stated above.
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  17. #17
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    Shimano rim brakes are some of the best rim brakes. They are NOT in the league of disc brakes for modulation, however. And they have particularly hampered by inadequacy when matched with carbon rims. But if you're not in the mountains or wet a lot then that isn't an issue at all imho. Just think of how we got along with worse than Shimano 6800 rim brakes for decades just fine.

    The disc brakes come with one other arguably more major advantage than braking: you can fit larger tires possibly with fenders. Most road bikes max out at 25mm tires, but it turns out science of rolling resistance has shown larger dia to not be a disadvantage as once thought, while comfort and aero can be improved with modern wheels and larger tires. For a person looking for a modern endurance bike, the disc brakes have to be a serious consideration (I dont have a road bike with discs yet, but my next n+1 bike will)

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