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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bnystrom View Post
    Perhaps some are or were, but my Ti hardtail MTB has a Kinesis sticker on it and IIRC, my aluminum fat bike frame does, too. Perhaps their road frames are made elsewhere, or if you've heard this recently, perhaps they've changed suppliers. My bikes are both a couple of years old.

    BTW, you're forgetting one very important option for finding the bike you want, the used market. "Forever frames" are often available used in great condition and as you pointed out, the surface finish can be quickly and easily restored to make it look like new.

    One more quick point, a really light Ti frame is likely to have some flex to it, so don't automatically reject those models when searching.
    A really light titanium frame is likely to have some flex if it's not built to be stiff, or if the rider is too heavy.

  2. #52
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    awesome,,, thanks everyone for the reading on the Titanium's.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tajue17 View Post
    awesome,,, thanks everyone for the reading on the Titanium's.
    So did you get one? What did you get?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #54
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    ti 1974;

    solid to this day,teledyne Titan.whats the opinion on Titanium frames these days.-p5pb12554565.jpg

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    The material is irrelevant i.e.; "carbon is the way to "guy" (go) now".

    The bike store gentleman probably doesn't have any titanium bikes on the floor which is a big reason why he's advocating what he does have, carbon.
    The weight differences are meaningless once you add the rider to the equation.

    Stiffness is over rated. Bikes have been plenty stiff enough for decades; you aren't going to get dropped on the next group ride because your frame wasn't stiff enough.

    Get a titanium frame if you like the idea of naked ti frames being low maintenance, or you like the look; whatever. Litespeed has a stellar reputation, by the way. You can't go wrong with them.
    I have seen some very bad Litespeed comments. Has management at Litespeed changed for the better, and offer customer service and stand behind their product now?
    KTM 300XC- This must be what it is like to be on Crack without the side effects!
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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    I have seen some very bad Litespeed comments. Has management at Litespeed changed for the better, and offer customer service and stand behind their product now?
    From what I understand, origianl owner (lynsky ithink) sold litespeed to american bike group, who also at the/over time owned quinaroo, merlin and tomac and they were doing waaay too much stuff (building mars rovers etc) and things went to poo pretty quick, but now they've unloaded merlin and tomac and seem to be doing a much better job just concentrating on litespeed and quinaroo and not much else. So don't quote me, could be wrong but they seem to have improved a lot over the last say 5 years.
    All the gear and no idea

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    From what I understand, origianl owner (lynsky ithink) sold litespeed to american bike group, who also at the/over time owned quinaroo, merlin and tomac and they were doing waaay too much stuff (building mars rovers etc) and things went to poo pretty quick, but now they've unloaded merlin and tomac and seem to be doing a much better job just concentrating on litespeed and quinaroo and not much else. So don't quote me, could be wrong but they seem to have improved a lot over the last say 5 years.
    Lynskey sold LS to the American Bicycle Group and signed a do not compete agreement, which forbade him from getting into the bicycle business for a number of years. That agreement lapsed and he got back in. I would suspect that the people working at LS probably stayed on and still make a quality product. As far as standing behind what they make, I've read of some complaints. Of course you read complaints about Trek, Specialized, etc.

    There's at least a half dozen titanium bike manufacturers I'd chose over Litespeed, but if you find a good deal on one, or there's a dealer in your town that you like and sells LS, go for it.

  8. #58
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    Don't know if this helps or not, but I've owned a Habanero Ti racing bike for some 11 years now....and I cannot tell the difference between it and a bespoke Seven that is/was supposed to be the cream de la creme of Ti. And the Haby is/was 1/5 the price of the Seven. Imho, you find someone that makes a quality and/or who has a quality Ti bike made, and stands behind their stuff, you go for it. Try to take reviews you read on the Web with a grain of salt.....very few who love their bike get on the Web and gush about it. But those who have problems with any type of bike? The Internet becomes their vocal hunting and cursing ground.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    I have seen some very bad Litespeed comments. Has management at Litespeed changed for the better, and offer customer service and stand behind their product now?
    Litespeed made some very light Ti frames for a few years (even with a stipulated weight limit IIRC)....which, surprise surprise, suffered bad longevity. Hence the ranting on the internet.


    I think by now they learned their lesson.


    Only thing about LS...they used friggin pressfit BBs. Yuck.
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  10. #60
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    Someone commented that "it's not like 2007". You're right, it's not. Very few are doing as much with Titanium as was done earlier because the metal is so expensive and hard to work with. I have a late 90's Litespeed Classic that is truly an example of the cliche', "They don't make em' like they used to". Every tube except the BB shell and head tube are tapered and butted and the whole thing is polished like a mirror. It'd be a $10k frame if they tried to make it the same way today.

    Helix tube shapes are a dumb gimmick. It does nothing but make the tube funny looking. Look for examples of this shape in other high performance engineering structures. You won't find it.


    "That's two men too many. I like knowing the guy I had a face to face chat with was the guy who selected, cut, mitred and welded all the tubes on my bike. He than finished the frame and put it in a box to send to me. He gave me exactly what I asked for. "

    That ^ is grossly underestimating the value of trained, experienced engineers with the resources to test and prove their work, which is what the larger brands offer.


    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    actually Lynskey seems to be in such a state they are dumping their state of the art frames at perplexingly low prices, from time to time. some on eBay, some specific models on their website etc.
    And there's that...
    Côte du Petit Pas d'Ane - Best climb name ever.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidka View Post
    Someone commented that "it's not like 2007". You're right, it's not. Very few are doing as much with Titanium as was done earlier because the metal is so expensive and hard to work with. I have a late 90's Litespeed Classic that is truly an example of the cliche', "They don't make em' like they used to". Every tube except the BB shell and head tube are tapered and butted and the whole thing is polished like a mirror. It'd be a $10k frame if they tried to make it the same way today.
    That's a pretty gross exaggeration. My '98 Vortex has considerably more manipulation of the tubes than a Classic and it's done on 6/4 Ti, which is much harder to work. Even with that, there's no way that a comparable frame would be anywhere near $10 today. Maybe $5-6K.

    Helix tube shapes are a dumb gimmick. It does nothing but make the tube funny looking. Look for examples of this shape in other high performance engineering structures. You won't find it.
    Here's just one of many examples you can find with a quick Google search:
    Attachment 322964

    How that relates to bicycle frames is anyone's guess.

  12. #62
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    The late 90’s Vortex actually has far less tube manipulation than a Classic of that era. A couple of ovalized tubes, but not much else. Great frame, but because it was 6/4, they couldn’t do as much with the material. Later frames with more shapely tubes were rolled & seam welded from sheet. The Classic, Ultimate and Some of the others had seamless, cold worked, full length tapers (think like Serotta’s Colorado steel, but Ti). That is simply no longer done on that scale. Later versions gradually lost the more expensive tubes and details like welded on F/D hangar and seat binder bosses in favor of cheaper clamps.

    Moots have round tube frames @ $4,500. There are plenty of other simple build ti frames in that price range. Lynskey charges $1,000 for the polish upgrade...
    Côte du Petit Pas d'Ane - Best climb name ever.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bnystrom View Post
    That's a pretty gross exaggeration. My '98 Vortex has considerably more manipulation of the tubes than a Classic and it's done on 6/4 Ti, which is much harder to work. Even with that, there's no way that a comparable frame would be anywhere near $10 today. Maybe $5-6K.
    Your Vortex has considerably less tube manipulation than a Classic from the same year, because they could not do the same processes on a 6/4. There is some ovalizing of the top and down tubes. The Classic has cold worked tubes with full length tapers throughout the entire frame.

    Moots sells round tube frames for $4,500. If the had the means (and the willing customers), a full tapered, polished (a $1k option @ Lynskey) would cost every bit of $10k.
    Côte du Petit Pas d'Ane - Best climb name ever.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidka View Post
    Your Vortex has considerably less tube manipulation than a Classic from the same year, because they could not do the same processes on a 6/4. There is some ovalizing of the top and down tubes. The Classic has cold worked tubes with full length tapers throughout the entire frame.

    Moots sells round tube frames for $4,500. If the had the means (and the willing customers), a full tapered, polished (a $1k option @ Lynskey) would cost every bit of $10k.
    Every tube on my Vortex is manipulated.
    KTM 300XC- This must be what it is like to be on Crack without the side effects!
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  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    Every tube on my Vortex is manipulated.
    All of the important tubes on my are, too. The only exceptions are the head tube, bottom bracket, brake bridge and chainstay bridge, which don't need or benefit from manipulation. Every other tube is either ovalized or curved.

  16. #66
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    My top tube is diamond shaped. Seat tube is 10 sided...

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    My top tube is diamond shaped. Seat tube is 10 sided...
    WHY?!?!?!?

    Why would you have diamond shaped top tube and 10 sided seat tube?

    WHY!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

    Forget it, there is no amount of web links you can provide that could possibly convince me diamond shaped top tube with 10 sided seat tube is a good idea.

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