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  1. #76
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    and ttug

    someone mentioned earlier
    Curtlo, custom about $1200 frame and fork out the door
    but the Raleigh or the Masi will do the job as well
    good luck finding a new ride
    what a great day
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  2. #77
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    Can you fit onto a 56cm?

    If so, there's a Kona Kapu with Ultegra on eBay right now for $1550 with free shipping. It's a 2009 that they say is a like-new demo. Seems like a killer deal to me.

    Dedacci SAT steel with chrome lugs. I can' tell you how many compliments I've gotten on mine (I have a 2008 in orange) - I got it from an RBR forumite, in this thread:

    Kona Kapu 08

    I have a couple of carbon bikes, a scandium, an aluminum, etc. The Kona gets as much time as any other in my stable.

    Here's the eBay auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/2009-Kona-Kapu-/...0#ht_506wt_932




    Last edited by ChilliConCarnage; 02-10-2011 at 09:50 AM.
    Cervelo Soloist Carbon / Specialized Roubaix Disc / Look 585 / Look 555 / Kona Kapu / Spec Carbon Camber 29er 1x11 / Surly Straggler / Fuji CX / Steel SS

    Over 60 bikes owned over the last 20 years!

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panzer
    Whether you agree with it or disagree with it is completely irrelevant. The fact is that there is virtually no demand for steel frames. If you believe that there is then you are just fooling yourself.
    Really? So that's why Specialized brought back a steel Allez model, because there's "no demand"?

    This is also why makes like Surly, Soma, and Rivendell continue to not only survive, but thrive? Ditto the likes of Raleigh, Jamis, Kona, Masi, what-have-you?

    You can say steel is a niche market, sure. But "no demand" is silly.

    And of course, custom steel will be a very long time in dying, if ever.
    .
    Monk: I want to go like my Dad did peacefully, in his sleep, not screaming in terror like his passengers.

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    EJD: Modern-day conservatism isn't conservatism, it's reaction rooted in deep pessimism that isn't in keeping with the American character.

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  4. #79
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    Wow!! Kona makes some really nice looking steelies.

  5. #80
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    agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by atpjunkie
    someone mentioned earlier
    Curtlo, custom about $1200 frame and fork out the door
    but the Raleigh or the Masi will do the job as well
    good luck finding a new ride
    what a great day
    Yes, it is a great day
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  6. #81
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    arrrgh

    Quote Originally Posted by ChilliConCarnage
    Can you fit onto a 56cm?

    If so, there's a Kona Kapu with Ultegra on eBay right now for $1550 with free shipping. It's a 2009 that they say is a like-new demo. Seems like a killer deal to me.

    Dedacci SAT steel with chrome lugs. I can' tell you how many compliments I've gotten on mine (I have a 2008 in orange) - I got it from an RBR forumite, in this thread:

    Kona Kapu 08

    I have a couple of carbon bikes, a scandium, an aluminum, etc. The Kona gets as much time as any other in my stable.

    Here's the eBay auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/2009-Kona-Kapu-/...0#ht_506wt_932




    56, yes. Bucks now, no.

    Nice frame
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  7. #82
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    Not that much further from lugged steel to custom geometry lugged steel.

    My Bob Jackson - now nearly five years old, must take some new shots. Lugged 853, every feature to my spec. My prefered geometry is a tad unusual - no sweat. Though it looks pretty much like a horizontal TT, its actually a 54 cm ST centre to centre, rotated up a cm at the front, down a cm at the back.

    The paint job is 'custom' too. Only the lettering is done with decals, the seat tube rings and lugging highlights are all hand painted. The only part of the finish I paid for as 'extra' was the chromed chainstays. When I asked them at the factory about it, they said it was a pleasure to paint a bike up in this style of finish.

    Corners mostly by my thinking about it some, goes precisely where pointed and suggests that it can handle a bunch more power than I can lay down these days.

    Bought because I had one a few years back - in 1973 - and couldn't resist the 'sentimental journey'. They're built pretty close to where I grew up in my native England, so I started the order by visiting the shop on a trip home - we were living near DC at the time. Everything bar the chrome plate was done in house - the plating's done in the next village. No 'creap clap flom chlina' with this frame.

    Snag is, my last one went a he!! of a sight faster. My wife reckons it has something to do with the snot-nosed crit loving sprinter kid who rode it ;)

    After a dismal experience with one of Trek's finest CF US made 'products', I suspect I shall stick with my custom built steel bike frame.

    regards

    Dereck
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails WTF happened to steel bikes?????-p3280007.jpg   WTF happened to steel bikes?????-full-frame-small.jpg   WTF happened to steel bikes?????-p3280013.jpg  
    Last edited by Dereck; 02-10-2011 at 03:28 PM.

  8. #83
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    I think the Kona is the same frame as the Bianchi Dolomiti (as in same actual manufacturer)
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  9. #84
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    i think so as well

    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray
    I think the Kona is the same frame as the Bianchi Dolomiti (as in same actual manufacturer)
    You are so right about the Bianchi, it looks sweet
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  10. #85
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    someday

    Quote Originally Posted by Dereck
    Not that much further from lugged steel to custom geometry lugged steel.

    My Bob Jackson - now nearly five years old, must take some new shots. Lugged 853, every feature to my spec. My prefered geometry is a tad unusual - no sweat. Though it looks pretty much like a horizontal TT, its actually a 54 cm ST centre to centre, rotated up a cm at the front, down a cm at the back.

    The paint job is 'custom' too. Only the lettering is done with decals, the seat tube rings and lugging highlights are all hand painted. The only part of the finish I paid for as 'extra' was the chromed chainstays. When I asked them at the factory about it, they said it was a pleasure to paint a bike up in this style of finish.

    Corners mostly by my thinking about it some, goes precisely where pointed and suggests that it can handle a bunch more power than I can lay down these days.

    Bought because I had one a few years back - in 1973 - and couldn't resist the 'sentimental journey'. They're built pretty close to where I grew up in my native England, so I started the order by visiting the shop on a trip home - we were living near DC at the time. Everything bar the chrome plate was done in house - the plating's done in the next village. No 'creap clap flom chlina' with this frame.

    Snag is, my last one went a he!! of a sight faster. My wife reckons it has something to do with the snot-nosed crit loving sprinter kid who rode it ;)

    After a dismal experience with one of Trek's finest CF US made 'products', I suspect I shall stick with my custom built steel bike frame.

    regards

    Dereck
    I want one of those in a Pista frame
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by atpjunkie
    something incongruous about an MXL w/ lightweight wheels
    and I'm an MXL owner

    That is sex on wheels!

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panzer
    Whether you agree with it or disagree with it is completely irrelevant. The fact is that there is virtually no demand for steel frames. If you believe that there is then you are just fooling yourself.
    Demand for high end steel bikes is growing. Just look at the growth of the North American Handbuilt Bike Show (NAHBS), which features more and more builders each year. They have a separate section for new builders, as there are 7-10 new builders each year.

    Most of the large mfrs (Trek, Specialized, etc) won't dedicate their lineup to steel bikes. Aluminum and carbon fiber provided greater margins, since the material and labor are cheaper for their scales of production. Their marketing and sponsoring of racing teams use carbon fiber, as the production techniques and material costs are well aligned with mass production.

    Lugged and filet brazed steel require a different level of craftsmanship and that kind of labor is expensive. It takes longer to build and high end steel tubing can cost more. Similarly with titanium compared to carbon fiber. Titanium and steel production works well for custom building. Custom builders don't spend money on R&D and marketing like the big companies; their marketing is word of mouth, internet and trade shows. And the customer is generally more knowledgeable about bikes and can customize the design as well as the look (stainless and ornate lugs, paint schemes).

    Steel is far from dead, it is concentrated at a different spectrum of the market.

  13. #88
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    Specialized brought back an Allez in steel that retails for $600 so I bet Trek and Giant won't be far behind.

    Used steel bikes are still a great value. Find an old Ciocc or Colnago in your size for a few hundred bucks, throw on a decent group and you are way ahead of the crowd.

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by robwh9
    Did you build up your bike yourself? Did you have any problems?

    Soma's FAQ says:

    We highly recommend you take your frame to a bike shop to be built. If you must do it yourself...You don't want to start building a frame only to find something wrong with it in the middle of building. Check frame and fork alignment. Face the BB and headtube, if needed. Chase the BB if needed. Check for burrs in the seat tube that might score your seatpost. Optional: Treat the insides of the frame with J.P. Weigle's Frame Saver for corrosion protection. If you do not have facing and chasing tools, try to look for resources in your area. In SF there is the non-profit Bike Kitchen that let's you go in and use their tools for free. And there are people there to answer questions as well."
    I built the bike up myself. I had the BB faced and chased. I didn't have the headtube faced because of the chrome lugs and the chance of the chrome chipping. Turned out just fine. I also treated the inside of the tubes with Framesaver, two applications to be sure. The build was easy and fun. Ninety percent of the parts I used are brand new. Lots of time went into just deciding on what brands of components to use. All in all, a fun experience.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by robwh9
    What the heck, I'm a randonneur geek, and I always felt inadequate because I didn't have a randonneur geek bike.

    I rode a Tange Prestige bike (a Lotus Prestige) from '87 to '98 and it had a sweet ride. My ride since then is Reynolds 853 (a KHS Aero Comp), also a sweet ride, but is in need of replacement.

    Let's see, now I need a Brooks saddle, a Carradice saddle bag (do they make handlebar bags too?), fenders, Schmidt hub generator and lights....am I missing anything?
    kudos on your new frame. I think you'll be very happy both with the feel of the ride as well as the asthetics. The final touch to my build, a Brooks saddle, should be here today. FWIW, the fenders I use are SKS, They really set it off although it took me a couple of hours to make them fit just the way I wanted. The rack is Axiom and I have Axiom panniers I use regularly. All in all I got what I wanted, no compromises and I know that on the next group ride there will be no other bike that looks quite like mine.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet sanchEz
    Specialized brought back an Allez in steel that retails for $600 so I bet Trek and Giant won't be far behind.

    .

    I certainly hope you are correct. With steel bikes from just Jamis, raleigh, surly, salsa, kona, etc; it is easy for shoppers to go you several stores and never see a steel bike nor ever be told the advantages of steel.

    Without exposure this sales are limited.
    We are adding 8 hi-grade steel bikes this year; but we would add a lot more if custoimers were more exposed to this fantastic frame material.
    mike
    http://www.bikesdirect.com - supports Mtbr.com and RoadBikeReview.com as great places to exchange ideas
    ~~~~
    "First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win." Mahatma Ghandi

  17. #92
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    Hi LandShark'n,

    I believe that I own your Landshark! The paint job is exactly the same, which doesn't seem possible since Slawta painted it by hand.

    I bought the frame only 2-3 years ago and brought it back to life. Had to have some work on done on the rear drop outs, which were slightly bent.

    Did you sell it on ebay?

    Gary

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powerbird View Post
    Hi LandShark'n,

    I believe that I own your Landshark! The paint job is exactly the same, which doesn't seem possible since Slawta painted it by hand.

    I bought the frame only 2-3 years ago and brought it back to life. Had to have some work on done on the rear drop outs, which were slightly bent.

    Did you sell it on ebay?

    Gary
    I'll bet it is the same one, but I sold it more than 2-3 years ago, so it probably exchanged hands a time or two since I had it. I purchased it from a gentleman in Columbia, SC and sold it. The buyer (hopefully it wasn't you) wasn't happy that the chainstays had been repainted. I had no idea whether they had been or not. It was my only Landshark, so I have nothing to compare it to.

    How is it treating you?

  19. #94
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    Yep, the guy who sold it to me indicated that the the chainstays had been repainted. After I got the bike frame, I sent John Slawta an image of the bike and he indicated that the paint job was the original without repainting. The bike is by far the best, most comfortable bike I have ever ridden, especially for rides over 50 miles. I will send you some pictures. So, what are you riding now?

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powerbird View Post
    Yep, the guy who sold it to me indicated that the the chainstays had been repainted. After I got the bike frame, I sent John Slawta an image of the bike and he indicated that the paint job was the original without repainting. The bike is by far the best, most comfortable bike I have ever ridden, especially for rides over 50 miles. I will send you some pictures. So, what are you riding now?
    It's great that you heard it directly from John Slawta. I agree that it is very comfortable and looking back, the primary reason I let it go was that the frame was just a bit to large for me. I bought it because it was a rare chance to own a Landshark.

    Right now, I'm down to two bikes. A Cannondale Quick that I use for commuting and an '87 Nishiki Modulus that was my first bike shop bike. It's now a fixie, but it's my go-to road bike.

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