Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483

    Alternative to CBP-3 UT/PT bearing puller?..

    I am looking for a good quality bearing puller that is a cost effective alternative to the UT bearing puller sold by Park. They sell new on ebay for about 60 bux. I can spring for that one but if I could find a good quality bearing puller that will work for the UT application for less, I will consider it. If you a good model pulller you can recommend, would be appreciated.
    Thanks.

    See CPB-3 below:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Alternative to CBP-3 UT/PT bearing puller?..-campy-park-bearing-puller-cbp-3.jpg  

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,736
    Check out both Harbor Freight and Grizzly Tools. You don't need anything special here. just a regular small bearing puller and a bit of mechanical ability, that's all. Oh, Sears Craftsman also, almost forght about them.
    If you were going to checkout some of the name brand tools like Proto, Wright , or Snapon (I could go on) you will be at the $60.00 mark again and you might as well buy the Park tool, it looks good enough. Check out Amico also

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Thanks Martin. I was looking for a known replacement puller...aka model and P/N. I know the 'right' generic bearing puller will work. Puller claw finger width has be correct due to tight distance between bearing and crank spider. Was looking for a specific suggestion.
    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,736
    OK, I will say that IMO the Park tool isn't really over priced. If you are going to use it a lot, if it was me, I'd buy it. Good luck with your search

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    OK, I will say that IMO the Park tool isn't really over priced. If you are going to use it a lot, if it was me, I'd buy it. Good luck with your search
    I guess the point is, no I won't use it a lot at all. I only own one bike with a UT crank and the bearings seem to last forever. I guess, why I was searching. What I don't want to do, it purchase a a puller that won't be effective, i.e. the puller fingers won't fit under the bearing due to tight clearance...and why I was looking for a particular model and P/N that would work. I scoured the the web for such an answer as well and nothing came up...except for one puller out there that is even better enginneered than the Park one...but it is $116. No doubt there are gear heads out there with a drawer full of bearing pullers that have one that work...key is finding which one. At the end of the day, I may just buy the Park puller as you suggest...I have a lot of their great tools and they are generally fair priced as you say.
    Thanks again Martin.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,736
    Actually for some reason I was thinking you were looking for this puller for a Power Torque crankset, not the bearing removal of a Ultra Torque. I'm sure you could just get what's called a bearing splitter for $10.00 to do the job. I mean it can only be pressed on about the width of the bearing and that's about 3/8in at most. Shouldn't need one to install. If it was me I'd get a piece of pipe and tap the new bearing on. Mechanial ability and skill counts here. If you are not fully confident of doing it with cave man tools (I am) I would buy the right tools or see how much a shop wants to change a bearing. Ultra Torque BB, you coul just take the crank half into the LBS. I don't see how it could could cost very much. I've literally removed and replaced hundreds of bearings, I'm comfortable with cave man....

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    Actually for some reason I was thinking you were looking for this puller for a Power Torque crankset, not the bearing removal of a Ultra Torque. I'm sure you could just get what's called a bearing splitter for $10.00 to do the job. I mean it can only be pressed on about the width of the bearing and that's about 3/8in at most. Shouldn't need one to install. If it was me I'd get a piece of pipe and tap the new bearing on. Mechanial ability and skill counts here. If you are not fully confident of doing it with cave man tools (I am) I would buy the right tools or see how much a shop wants to change a bearing. Ultra Torque BB, you coul just take the crank half into the LBS. I don't see how it could could cost very much. I've literally removed and replaced hundreds of bearings, I'm comfortable with cave man....
    Nope, just UT. I will never own a Campy PT crank. I don't like the attachment of the PT arm to the single long spindle.
    Also, to me this isn't a finesse versus cave man thing either. It is simply finding a cost effective solution that works. Below is a pic of my UT crank. The crevice under the bearing is very close clearance to the back of the spider. So the puller I need has to have thin fingers for adequate grab of the bearing.
    I will tell you what will work with some effectiveness and takes the type of puller out of the equation a bit. The CBP-5 'fixture' which is designed for PT can also be used for UT with a more clumsy puller. See a pic showing it in use. Of course the cost of the PT fixture again increases tool cost so a bit of six of one half dozen of the other.
    I will probably just pick up a CBP-3 and call it good since nobody seems to be able to reference a generic puller that will work.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Alternative to CBP-3 UT/PT bearing puller?..-campy-ut-bearing-close-up.jpg  
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,104
    I just bought a cheap bearing puller with the right depth and put the yaws to the bench grinder till they fit between the bearing and the crank arm and that has worked fine. I had a piece of plastic pipe with the proper inside diameter and have used this as a makeshift press.

    While not the most elegant of tools they have done the job remarkably well for occasional home use.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,736
    Ever heard of a Wonder Bar ( it's a small pry bar)? How about 2 wonder bars? I bet that would pop that bearing off easy.
    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    Nope, just UT. I will never own a Campy PT crank. I don't like the attachment of the PT arm to the single long spindle.
    Also, to me this isn't a finesse versus cave man thing either. It is simply finding a cost effective solution that works. Below is a pic of my UT crank. The crevice under the bearing is very close clearance to the back of the spider. So the puller I need has to have thin fingers for adequate grab of the bearing.
    I will tell you what will work with some effectiveness and takes the type of puller out of the equation a bit. The CBP-5 'fixture' which is designed for PT can also be used for UT with a more clumsy puller. See a pic showing it in use. Of course the cost of the PT fixture again increases tool cost so a bit of six of one half dozen of the other.
    I will probably just pick up a CBP-3 and call it good since nobody seems to be able to reference a generic puller that will work.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    Ever heard of a Wonder Bar ( it's a small pry bar)? How about 2 wonder bars? I bet that would pop that bearing off easy.
    Problem there is a pry bar places pressure where you don't want it....into the backside of the spider...why I wouldn't go there. Quite certain it would work however...just dont' want to use the spider as a fulcrum for leverage.
    Cheers.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I just bought a cheap bearing puller with the right depth and put the yaws to the bench grinder till they fit between the bearing and the crank arm and that has worked fine. I had a piece of plastic pipe with the proper inside diameter and have used this as a makeshift press.

    While not the most elegant of tools they have done the job remarkably well for occasional home use.
    Thanks for your advice velodog. Grinding a generic puller's fingers is a clever idea and quite right, ordinary PVC would work nicely as a sleeve to press the bearings back on.

    A couple more questions for you if I may. Did you 'press' the new bearing in place?...or did you tap the sleeve with a hammer? Also, did you put a light film of oil on the spindle to reduce press force when installing new bearings? Final question, there are a number of different replacement bearing options available including ceramic. What did you go with?
    Thanks again.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,736
    Oh, OK. The tang on a Wonderbar "is" quite long....at least an 1 & 1/2. it would be placing pressure way out on the spyder
    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    Problem there is a pry bar places pressure where you don't want it....into the backside of the spider...why I wouldn't go there. Quite certain it would work however...just dont' want to use the spider as a fulcrum for leverage.
    Cheers.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,104
    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    Thanks for your advice velodog. Grinding a generic puller's fingers is a clever idea and quite right, ordinary PVC would work nicely as a sleeve to press the bearings back on.

    A couple more questions for you if I may. Did you 'press' the new bearing in place?...or did you tap the sleeve with a hammer? Also, did you put a light film of oil on the spindle to reduce press force when installing new bearings? Final question, there are a number of different replacement bearing options available including ceramic. What did you go with?
    Thanks again.
    I tapped it with a hammer and while I didn't apply any lubricant there was a bit of residual grease from the old bearing.
    I went with the stock Campagnolo bearings,. No ceramic for me, they strike me as nothing but hype.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I tapped it with a hammer and while I didn't apply any lubricant there was a bit of residual grease from the old bearing.
    I went with the stock Campagnolo bearings,. No ceramic for me, they strike me as nothing but hype.
    Where did you order the Campy bearings from?...you have a cost effective source?
    Thanks
    PS: I have found that on line bike shops from the UK have good prices for Campy parts...not sure about bearings.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    395
    RW;
    I own the Park puller and for what it's worth, it's a great unit. I have pulled the bearings many times just servicing them off season.
    Also I have used them to pull bearings from an older set of Campy pedals very successfully.
    The Park puller is a very useful puller and the installation cup that comes with it is very nice too. Although you could use deep sockets to install for different sized bearings in other applications.
    The UT bearings are available from bearing manufacturers out there. I have used Enduro brand bearings , Boca and several others.
    The UT crank bearings are measured ID x OD x Width (25x37x6mm) and if I'm not mistaken is known within the industry as a 6805 bearing.
    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by bikerjohn64; 08-30-2012 at 05:36 AM.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: roadworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjohn64 View Post
    RW;
    I own the Park puller and for what it's worth, it's a great unit. I have pulled the bearings many times just servicing them off season.
    Also I have used them to pull bearings from an older set of Campy pedals very successfully.
    The Park puller is a very useful puller and the installation cup that comes with it is very nice too. Although you could use deep sockets to install for different sized bearings in other applications.
    The UT bearings are available from bearing manufacturers out there. I have used Enduro brand bearings , Boca and several others.
    The UT crank bearings are measured ID x OD x Width (25x37x6mm) and if I'm not mistaken is known within the industry as a 6805 bearing.
    Hope that helps.
    Thank you very much John. Believe I will go ahead and order the CBP-3 puller. Thanks also for the tips on what bearings are available.
    Kind regards.
    Last edited by roadworthy; 08-30-2012 at 02:24 PM.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    692
    There is a hozan (i believe) crownrace remover that can work also, are two pieces and they should fit perfectly under the bearing. Once the bearing is off a couple of mm then is just pry a little bit and will pop up. The crownrace remover is super cheap, autoparts sells something similar too and way cheaper than the park tool.

    As for installing the bearing , a plastic pipe will do nicely.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: alexboer2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    14

    10 euro for Yato Extractor 3/75mm -1,1t YT-2515


    works perfectly ,buy bearings Campagnolo Bearing and Seal Kit for Ultra Torque Bottom Bracket FC-RE012
    from Bike-Shop mit Best-Price Garantie | H&S Bike-Discount = price 20.95 euro+7.95 euro shipping
    I have Campagnolo Chorus 2010 Ultra-Torque Carbon Crankset 11-speed Crank Arm Length / Ratio: 170mm - 53/39.
    I changed the bearings after 6.500 km.


    Last edited by alexboer2004; 08-31-2012 at 12:53 AM.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    907
    I bought the CBP-3. My LBS ordered it for me. Can in the next day and was about $50. It's a great unit.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

EUROBIKE

Hot Deals

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook