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  1. #1
    Anphaque II
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    Question nOOB Questions On Campagnolo Groupset

    I'm a life-long MTB'er and have never owned a road bike.

    I'm building my first road bike this season and have questions regarding road bike groupset (Please remember I'm a nOOB!).


    Since I've never owned a RB I don't have any time with how RB shifters feel/work/ etc.:

    1) Will I have any problems if I just get the Campy groupset without any experience with the groupset (Or any RB groupset for that matter)?

    2) I'm looking at the Record groupset. What kind of lifespan can I expect from the the Campy CF? I don't and won't race, I'll put between 2,000 to 5,000 miles a year on them, I'll ride in the rain, and I'll do more than half my riding before dawn.

    3) Should I compare Campy to Shimano?

    4) Should I try to test driver Campy first?

    5) Any general or specific differences between Campy and Shimano? Should I care if there is?

    6) Can I run a Campy triple crankset with any of their shifters?

    7) Names of recommended/trustworthy Campy dealers in the U.S.?

    8) Are all Campy cassettes interchangeable (Ex: Record groupset with Centaur cassette)?

    9) Any other advise on Campy that I haven't covered but need to know?


    Thanks much!
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  2. #2
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455 View Post
    I'm a life-long MTB'er and have never owned a road bike.

    I'm building my first road bike this season and have questions regarding road bike groupset (Please remember I'm a nOOB!).


    Since I've never owned a RB I don't have any time with how RB shifters feel/work/ etc.:

    1) Will I have any problems if I just get the Campy groupset without any experience with the groupset (Or any RB groupset for that matter)?
    It usually takes a little time to learn and adapt to a different commands actuation, you are a mountain biker so you are used to use your thumb to shift so the adaptation period would be very short.
    2) I'm looking at the Record groupset. What kind of lifespan can I expect from the the Campy CF? I don't and won't race, I'll put between 2,000 to 5,000 miles a year on them, I'll ride in the rain, and I'll do more than half my riding before dawn.
    Campagnolo components last very long, I have a bike that has 10 years old Record 10 and still works flawlesly.
    If you ride in the rain you will wear your components and wheels faster for sure, but it is not the water that damages the components, but the grime and dirt you collect on the road and also keep riding after the grease/oil gets washed away by rain.
    If you clean your bike after a rainy ride ( so shower it with clean water ) and oil it and grease it again after it dries then your components will last a long time, rims on the other hand will get more wear due to mud/dirty water.
    keep in mind, rain drops are not pure water, they often had a grain of sand inside, so rain dirty water on rims and brake pads is like very fine wet sandpaper, clean your brake pads often.
    3) Should I compare Campy to Shimano?
    nope
    4) Should I try to test driver Campy first?
    try if you can, but you won't be disapointed with Campagnolo.
    5) Any general or specific differences between Campy and Shimano? Should I care if there is?
    many, but you shouldn't care, you did the right choice already
    6) Can I run a Campy triple crankset with any of their shifters?
    Yes, but there are only 10 speed Campy triples on the market ( Campagnolo COMP Triple ) you could get similar range with a compact 50/34 and 12-29 casette, but I would advice you to HTFU ;)
    7) Names of recommended/trustworthy Campy dealers in the U.S.?
    don't know
    8) Are all Campy cassettes interchangeable (Ex: Record groupset with Centaur cassette)?
    Athena/Chorus/Record/Super Record are 11speed
    Veloce/Centaur is 10 speed
    9) Any other advise on Campy that I haven't covered but need to know?
    just enjoy it
    Thanks much!
    you're welcome
    Quote Originally Posted by zank
    They're just bikes. Ride 'em in the rain, salt, snow and crap to fully appreciate them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Kelly
    The thing about the cold is that you can never tell how cold it is from looking out a kitchen window. You have to dress up, get out training and when you come back, you then know how cold it is.

  3. #3
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    You're looking at Record, which is mighty fine. I'll just say that Chorus works and feels exactly the same for a little weight penalty and a lower price.
    I'll also say that the thumb shifter makes a good cause for choosing a short and shallow bar shape like
    FSA Compact
    Deda RHM
    3T Ergnova
    Ritchey Curve
    Zipp SSR
    They all make it easy to reach the thumb shifter from the drops without moving your hands.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  4. #4
    Anphaque II
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    You're looking at Record, which is mighty fine. I'll just say that Chorus works and feels exactly the same for a little weight penalty and a lower price.
    I'll also say that the thumb shifter makes a good cause for choosing a short and shallow bar shape like
    FSA Compact
    Deda RHM
    3T Ergnova
    Ritchey Curve
    Zipp SSR
    They all make it easy to reach the thumb shifter from the drops without moving your hands.

    Wow; The price difference is a set of custom wheels ($749) !

    Thanks for the tips!
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  5. #5
    Anphaque II
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    It's not the price of the horse. It's the cost of upkeep that's expensive.
    Looking at Campy stuff; Um, I noticed that EVERYTHING is expensive !

    Examples:

    1) Campy 11 speed chain tool-$300

    2) Campy 11 Record cassette-$440 to $570

    3) Campy Chorus cassette-$200 to $240

    4) Campy Record chain-$90

    5) Campy Corkscrew-$275
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  6. #6
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    You obviously need the corkscrew.

    Have you checked the prices at the UK web shops?
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455 View Post
    Looking at Campy stuff; Um, I noticed that EVERYTHING is expensive !

    Examples:

    1) Campy 11 speed chain tool-$300

    2) Campy 11 Record cassette-$440 to $570

    3) Campy Chorus cassette-$200 to $240

    4) Campy Record chain-$90

    5) Campy Corkscrew-$275
    1) Park makes a chain tool which is cheaper and works on campy chains.
    3) Use a chorus chain, you'll save a little $...or use a KMC 11-speed chain, then you won't need either the campy chain tool or the park chain tool, but you will need the KMC link tools to take the chain on/off, which is nice when you need to clean it.
    5) Some people pay double for that cork screw

    Have fun!
    2013 Cervelo P5
    2015 Cervelo R5
    2012 Specialized S-works Tarmac SL4
    2013 BMC TM01
    2013 BMC TMR01


  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Keep in mind every Campy component you buy can be rebuilt and will virtually last forever.

  9. #9
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455 View Post
    Looking at Campy stuff; Um, I noticed that EVERYTHING is expensive !

    Examples:

    1) Campy 11 speed chain tool-$300

    2) Campy 11 Record cassette-$440 to $570

    3) Campy Chorus cassette-$200 to $240

    4) Campy Record chain-$90

    5) Campy Corkscrew-$275
    Those are +- the double as what we usually pay here in Yurop.
    Quote Originally Posted by zank
    They're just bikes. Ride 'em in the rain, salt, snow and crap to fully appreciate them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Kelly
    The thing about the cold is that you can never tell how cold it is from looking out a kitchen window. You have to dress up, get out training and when you come back, you then know how cold it is.

  10. #10
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    I've built mt last two bikes with Campy 11 using eBay, Velomine (Illinois dealer with great website highly recommended for Campy), and Wiggle in the UK and you can do so saving lots of money over North American MSRP.

    I have a nice mix of Chorus and Athena. The stuff last forever and it does break-in not break down.

  11. #11
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    Since is the 1st time you will be playing with this things and pretty much looks like you will beat the cr@p out the bike i would advice you to get athena 11 speed in silver, all aluminum no carbon components. Why?? is cheaper and works the same than record but with some extra grams, don't ask me how many because since i stopped racing like 25 years ago i don't care about weight no more. Don't worry about weight man, worry about reliability.

    That said, you can find a full athena group for around 1000 bucks, maybe less.

    About the tools, park makes an 11 chain tool but so far by experience the VAR 10 speed one i have worked the same.

    Pick ultra torque, there is athena power torque. Why UT? well it will make your life easier if you want to extract the cranks, power torque uses a extractor so this way u will save cash if you get ultra torque, one less tool to get.

    For the UT cups the shimano tool that probably u have already will work just fine. I'm almost sure u have all the tools needed already.

    Wheels, u need a set of wheels compatible with campagnolo. Probably in forums or eflay you can get a set w/o braking the bank. If you are good putting wheels together, lacing and stuff i would advice you to get a set of miche rc2 or the miche primato hubset, get the rims spokes and lace that wheel yourself, and done with it.

    Where to get the stuff?? Velo Mine in Springfield IL, give them a call they have groups and wheels (not related with them ok? they are pretty good as a shop and have good prices).

    Hmmm dunno what else, pretty much if you have problems just post the question, but if you are good figuring out and have put a lot of bikes together doubt you will have problems setting up a campy group.

    An advice, the instructions for the BB cups are really like cr@p, so do this... put grease in the BB shell threads... then put teflon tape in the BB cup threads, put the cups in and just tight them really well (havent used a single torque tool ever and pretty much there is no way you will damage the bb shell or the cups if you crank them pretty hard), put the driver side crank in, put the clip IN (u will now when u see it), put the non driver side crank in, put grease and teflon tape to the center bolt (u dont want that to get lose or get stuck in there), tight really well... done. The other components are too easy to install, u don't even need instructions for them

    Good luck.
    Last edited by ultraman6970; 03-20-2012 at 05:38 PM.

  12. #12
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    Athena shifters (Power Shift) don't work like Record and Chorus shifters (Ultra Shift). Power Shift does not give you that wonderful double dump. You'd have to do multiple clicks to upshift the cassette, just like on SRAMano. Athena cranks (Power Torque) require special tools.

    You could go Athena on all but those two components, cda.
    Last edited by kbwh; 03-20-2012 at 11:18 PM.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  13. #13
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    I am also a long life mountain biker (still am). I now have 6 months on my first road bike. When I was looking for a road bike I tried the different shifters, sram, shimano, campy. As soon as I road a bike with campy I knew that is what I wanted and never looked back. I like the feel of it, the hoods, & the way the shifters work. I can recomend Velomine for parts too.

  14. #14
    Anphaque II
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    Athena shifters (Power Shift) don't work like Record and Chorus shifters (Ultra Shift). Power Shift does not give you that wonderful double dump. You'd have to do multiple clicks to upshift the cassette, just like on SRAMano. Athena cranks (Power Torque) require special tools.

    You could go Athena on all but those two components, cda.

    Dude, you know I want the 'double dump' (Pun intended) !


    Which ever groupset I get it'll be a complete set.
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  15. #15
    Anphaque II
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salsa_Lover View Post
    Campagnolo components last very long, I have a bike that has 10 years old Record 10 and still works flawlesly.
    If you ride in the rain you will wear your components and wheels faster for sure, but it is not the water that damages the components, but the grime and dirt you collect on the road and also keep riding after the grease/oil gets washed away by rain.
    If you clean your bike after a rainy ride ( so shower it with clean water ) and oil it and grease it again after it dries then your components will last a long time, rims on the other hand will get more wear due to mud/dirty water.
    keep in mind, rain drops are not pure water, they often had a grain of sand inside, so rain dirty water on rims and brake pads is like very fine wet sandpaper, clean your brake pads often.
    I've been pondering your points here.


    Maybe the bike will be just a fair weather bike.

    Between mid April until late October is desert weather in my area.
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  16. #16
    Anphaque II
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bizman View Post
    I am also a long life mountain biker (still am). I now have 6 months on my first road bike. When I was looking for a road bike I tried the different shifters, sram, shimano, campy. As soon as I road a bike with campy I knew that is what I wanted and never looked back. I like the feel of it, the hoods, & the way the shifters work. I can recomend Velomine for parts too.

    Thanks for your input.

    It's going to be interesting. I'm used to riding 15 to 20MPH on the road with my 31lb FS MTB with suspension locked out. From what I understand I'll probably bump up to around 25 to 30MPH with the RB.
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  17. #17
    Anphaque II
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    What's the largest/widest tire I can squeeze past Campy caliper brakes?

    Hopefully a 28mm because I'm a Clydesdale.
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  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    28??

    If you want to ride that better get a CX bike. A road bike with 28 tires is like having a F1 car with tractor wheels man

  19. #19
    Big is relative
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455 View Post
    What's the largest/widest tire I can squeeze past Campy caliper brakes?

    Hopefully a 28mm because I'm a Clydesdale.
    28 will work just fine. Just make sure it clears the fork.
    Retired sailor

  20. #20
    classiquesklassieker
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbill View Post
    28 will work just fine. Just make sure it clears the fork.
    And to add to this, of course make sure that the rear triangle can take a 28c. Basically this is more a frame/fork question.

    For what it's worth, I use a set of Tektro brakes on my 28c-capable frame.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Theres two types of groupsets. 1. Campy and 2. Everything else! websites like Ribble will be your best friend as their prices are pretty sharp :-)

    Just an indication for you, I got over 10000kms off a 11speed Record chain and the Chorus cassette that I used is still going strong on another bike. Its popular to run a Chorus Cassette with SR or Record to keep the miles off the titanium cassettes or prices down.

    The oldest saying is "shimano wears out whilst campy wears in".

    Enjoy your pasta for years to come!!!
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  22. #22
    So. Calif.
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    Chains

    cda 455,

    Give some thought to having 2 or even 3 Chorus chains, that you can rotate every 3K miles or so. That will greatly extend the life of cassettes. There have been several threads on this, over the years. Of course, it's not mandatory to do this, but I think it is much more economical use of the cassettes & chains.

    For exmpl, I rotate among 3 chains:

    Chain A for about 3K miles (approx 1/3 of useful life).
    Chain B for 3K mi.
    Chain C for 3K mi.
    Repeat the above a total of 3 times.

    At the end, you will have gotten about 9K miles from each chain and over 25K mi from the cassette. I am about halfway thru this sequence. You could also do it with 2 chains, going about 4K on each chain before swapping.

    Do NOT use the common Shimano/SRM criteria for replacing chains, or one of the short chain-checker tools made by Park & others. These lead to premature chain replacememtn, even though the Campy chain is not wearing out.

    Campy's spec is:
    Measure between bushings/rollers of 6 outer plate links with a vernier cailper, the max allowed is 132.60 mm.

    If you plan on doing your own maintenance, Campy brand 11sp chain tool has some advantages over the 2 separate tools from Park.

    If you buy tool from UK, should be able to find it under $150. Unfortunately you missed Ribble's recent Campy sale, their already low prices were reduced another 20% or so. I find Ribble usually has better Campy prices han Wiggle (but not always).

    The Campy tool effectively has a built-in Go/NoGo guage that ensures the joining pin is inserted the corrected depth: you cannot "peen" the head of pin from the drive-side, unless rear of pin (non-drive-side) has been pressed to correct depth. There is a Campy video on Youtube showing this.

    As with most modern chains, you must never use the same chain hole twice. Once a field service pin is installed, you can only break and rejoin the chain at a different location.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    1) I use my Park chain tool on our Mountain Bikes (SRAM & Shimano components), Campy 11spd Road bikes and my wife's Shimano road bike with no problems.

    2-4) It'll last twice as long as other brands when properly maintained - and if you have a good LBS you should be able to work a SIGNIFICANT discount

    5) Does anyone else even offer one?

    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455 View Post
    Looking at Campy stuff; Um, I noticed that EVERYTHING is expensive !

    Examples:

    1) Campy 11 speed chain tool-$300

    2) Campy 11 Record cassette-$440 to $570

    3) Campy Chorus cassette-$200 to $240

    4) Campy Record chain-$90

    5) Campy Corkscrew-$275
    miles to posts ratio is > 30:1

  24. #24
    T K
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    wasssabi
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    I'm considering putting campy on my new (old) Bianchi. I'm wondering about the thumb levers though. I would think they would have made them reachable whilst in the drops, but it just looks like they wouldn't be. Is this an issue at all? Or not, if you have really long thumbs.

  25. #25
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    it is not an issue if you place the levers on the right position, many tend to place them higher than they should and then the thumb levers are too high to pull them while in the drops.

    If you project an imaginary line from the drops the tip of the levers should touch that line

    look at the first illustration on this page ( it is interactive so you can see many handlebar shapes )

    Road Drop Bar Geometry : La Rueda Tropical
    Quote Originally Posted by zank
    They're just bikes. Ride 'em in the rain, salt, snow and crap to fully appreciate them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Kelly
    The thing about the cold is that you can never tell how cold it is from looking out a kitchen window. You have to dress up, get out training and when you come back, you then know how cold it is.

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