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Thread: CAAD10 headset

  1. #1
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    CAAD10 headset

    Hi all! First post. I've noticed that the headset bearings seat very loose in the frame. I'd say there is about 0.25mm of slop/gap between the frame and the bottom bearing cartridge. If I insert it dry (no lube), it will fall right out without any resistance whatsoever. Of course, when I actually install it, I apply lube - which will mostly hold it in place unless I shake the frame. Is this normal for the CAAD10? Is there a way to have a more snug fit?

    I'm concerned the bearing assembly is migrating in the head tube while riding. I've had creaking, but I'm not 100% sure it's coming from this area.
    Last edited by FUFB; 05-06-2013 at 05:32 AM.

  2. #2
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    G'day mate, whilst the bearings are not supposed to swim around inside the headtube, they are not press-fit, or even snug at times and gravity will let them drop out.

    0.25mm / 9 thousandths of an inch (0.009") isn't a lot of play, so I suspect that it would be within tolerances - is the bike brand new, or secondhand, ie, could it have had the bearings replaced?

    If it tightens up and there is no play in the headset when all is torqued, then it ought not be a problem. I doubt that it will migrate into the headtube - it has a detent / step that prevents this from occurring.

    cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by macca33 View Post
    G'day mate, whilst the bearings are not supposed to swim around inside the headtube, they are not press-fit, or even snug at times and gravity will let them drop out.

    0.25mm / 9 thousandths of an inch (0.009") isn't a lot of play, so I suspect that it would be within tolerances - is the bike brand new, or secondhand, ie, could it have had the bearings replaced?

    If it tightens up and there is no play in the headset when all is torqued, then it ought not be a problem. I doubt that it will migrate into the headtube - it has a detent / step that prevents this from occurring.

    cheers
    Thanks for your response. I was pretty sure this was within tolerances, but wanted some feedback. Just so we're clear, the 0.25mm is the total difference between the inner diameter of the head tube and the outer diameter of the bearing cartridge. So, it has 0.125mm gap all the way around. I'm the original owner, and it has low miles on it. The bearings came with the bike (from the dealer).

    I'm not a big fan of how integrated headsets can possibly wear the headtube (race), so I was just trying to think ahead. I've read many articles on the issue, and it appears the first best step is to tighten the headset a bit more than a typical headset. So with a typical headset, I know you are supposed to tighten until the up/down fork play just disappears. But with integrated it sounds like an extra 1/8-1/4 turn is appropriate to minimize any possible cartridge migration.

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    No worries mate - enjoy the ride!

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    CAAD10 headset

    I have a Caad 10 . It also developed a bit of headset play after a few hundred miles. I had to clean lube and tighten the whole front end.

    The headset seems to take more torque than other integrated headsets. I tighten these things by feel, and tighter ( than "normal") seems to seat everything and work better.
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe99 View Post
    I have a Caad 10 . It also developed a bit of headset play after a few hundred miles. I had to clean lube and tighten the whole front end.

    The headset seems to take more torque than other integrated headsets. I tighten these things by feel, and tighter ( than "normal") seems to seat everything and work better.
    Same with mine. You do have to be wary of not stripping out the top-cap hex through too much torque though - not a fantastic design, IMO.

    cheers

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by macca33 View Post
    Same with mine. You do have to be wary of not stripping out the top-cap hex through too much torque though - not a fantastic design, IMO.

    cheers
    Never seen this striping you speak of. You do need to adjust with the stem loose. You knew that right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    Never seen this striping you speak of. You do need to adjust with the stem loose. You knew that right?
    I agree, if you're anywhere to the point close to striping the top cap's hex, you're doing something wrong.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by macca33 View Post
    Same with mine. You do have to be wary of not stripping out the top-cap hex through too much torque though - not a fantastic design, IMO.

    cheers
    Stripping the adjustment bolt that loads the headset? While I have never taken apart the headset of a CAAD10 frameset, I've taken the ones off my CAAD4, CAAD9, Super Six, Slice without any problems. Never have I stripped or come even close to stripping that bolt. If you use the correct size allen wrench, you're turning the bolt to eliminate the play in the headset. I doubt that the tension required would even register on a torque wrench (maybe a micro-torque).

    Now, the bolts on that clamp down the stem to the steerer tubes are different. You'll find those in steel, titanium or even aluminum. You can strip those quite easily, if you don't use the correct size allen wrench. NEVER EVER torque these bolts by feel, unless you're in the field and do not have any other choice. At home, use a correctly calibrated torque wrench. You can easily damage carbon steerers or stretch the bolts to near failure point.

    On a carbon steerer tuber, apply a small amount of assembly compound to the outer surface of the tube before installing the stem. Tacx, FSA, Park Tools, Pedro, etc all make this stuff. I have a small jar of Tacx that has lasted me close to 10 years already. You don't need much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    Never seen this striping you speak of. You do need to adjust with the stem loose. You knew that right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous View Post
    I agree, if you're anywhere to the point close to striping the top cap's hex, you're doing something wrong.
    Quote Originally Posted by CHL View Post
    Stripping the adjustment bolt that loads the headset? While I have never taken apart the headset of a CAAD10 frameset, I've taken the ones off my CAAD4, CAAD9, Super Six, Slice without any problems. Never have I stripped or come even close to stripping that bolt. If you use the correct size allen wrench, you're turning the bolt to eliminate the play in the headset. I doubt that the tension required would even register on a torque wrench (maybe a micro-torque).

    Now, the bolts on that clamp down the stem to the steerer tubes are different. You'll find those in steel, titanium or even aluminum. You can strip those quite easily, if you don't use the correct size allen wrench. NEVER EVER torque these bolts by feel, unless you're in the field and do not have any other choice. At home, use a correctly calibrated torque wrench. You can easily damage carbon steerers or stretch the bolts to near failure point.

    On a carbon steerer tuber, apply a small amount of assembly compound to the outer surface of the tube before installing the stem. Tacx, FSA, Park Tools, Pedro, etc all make this stuff. I have a small jar of Tacx that has lasted me close to 10 years already. You don't need much.


    I've never stripped the hex in the top cap, but have seen it done by some bloke on another forum - he probably didn't have the stem bolts loose - who knows? Point is, the aluminium top-cap could be stripped when over-torqued, so is worth watching out for.

    cheers

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    Never seen this striping you speak of. You do need to adjust with the stem loose. You knew that right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous View Post
    I agree, if you're anywhere to the point close to striping the top cap's hex, you're doing something wrong.
    Quote Originally Posted by CHL View Post
    Stripping the adjustment bolt that loads the headset? While I have never taken apart the headset of a CAAD10 frameset, I've taken the ones off my CAAD4, CAAD9, Super Six, Slice without any problems. Never have I stripped or come even close to stripping that bolt. If you use the correct size allen wrench, you're turning the bolt to eliminate the play in the headset. I doubt that the tension required would even register on a torque wrench (maybe a micro-torque).

    Now, the bolts on that clamp down the stem to the steerer tubes are different. You'll find those in steel, titanium or even aluminum. You can strip those quite easily, if you don't use the correct size allen wrench. NEVER EVER torque these bolts by feel, unless you're in the field and do not have any other choice. At home, use a correctly calibrated torque wrench. You can easily damage carbon steerers or stretch the bolts to near failure point.

    On a carbon steerer tuber, apply a small amount of assembly compound to the outer surface of the tube before installing the stem. Tacx, FSA, Park Tools, Pedro, etc all make this stuff. I have a small jar of Tacx that has lasted me close to 10 years already. You don't need much.


    I've never stripped the hex in the top cap, but have seen it done by some bloke on another forum - he probably didn't have the stem bolts loose - who knows? Point is, the aluminium top-cap could be stripped when over-torqued, so is worth watching out for.

    cheers

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