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  1. #1
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    I have a used cannondale... and i need suggestions

    So my dad gave me a used cannondale R500. Im a 5'6 Male BTW and the bike is a woman before.

    Anyways, He had purchased it for my younger brother who rode it like a kid who thinks bikes are all the same.

    I am just barely starting to get into cycling for fun, but it seems like everytime I go out, i have problems.

    The first is that i get a flat 50% of the time. I just need to check the rims and tube, but maybe i can get those replaced.

    the problem that annoys me the most has to do with me switching gears. I have shimano 105's on the bike but i have trouble switching gears when i am riding.

    At some points, it will make a clicking sound and i think its from the chains rubbing on the frame. Other times it will some how lock up and will not let me pedal. I can usually stay in some safe speeds with the gears and have a short ride, until my tire goes flat.

    Anyways, I have gotten someone to look at it once but it didnt help at all. I am planning on taking it to a shop to see what they can tell me, but i wanted to get in a forum and at least learn about my bike.

    Can you guys tell me what would cause this? Maybe something is bent and not switching well or maybe its not repairable?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: ph0enix's Avatar
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    Taking the bike to a shop for a tune up is your best bet. Excessive flats are usually caused by worn tires or incorrectly installed tubes/tires.
    Shifter cables will most likely need to be replaced and both derailleurs adjusted (to help with the shifting).
    My other chainring is a 39...
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  3. #3
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    thanks! I have only changed 2 of the tubes from the flat tires and one is still working. The other, im hoping i may not have pinched the tube.

    The Tires are new but cheap, rims are original, and tubes are replaced every other ride it seems like. I did check the around the tire and rim for a snag, but it feels smooth i guess.

    would it be a good idea to get new rims? Im not too worried about spending money, but if the cost of everything i need ends up being the price of a new bike, i would just hold off for that.

  4. #4
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    I wouldn't jump to conclusions that replacing the rims will solve the issue with the flats. If the rim strip is properly installed than you shouldn't have problems with your rims. It's more likely that you have a piece of road debris stuck in a tire. Make sure you inspect your tire very carefully, run your finger around the inside of the tire before you install the new tube. Check for any burrs or imperfections that might be puncturing your tubes. I've had to use tweezers a couple of times to pull out small pieces of metal and glass from my tires before. If it is a reoccurring problem it may be a good idea to inflate your old tube and submerge it in water in a bath tub to see where air is leaking. This will help you diagnose what is causing the flats. If it is from the outside of the tube, it's got to be the tire. If it is on the inside than it could be from the rim. Also, make sure you're inflating your tires to the proper pressure before you ride as well.

    Worst case have your LBS take a look at it when you take it in for a tune.

  5. #5
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    I think nice tires are worth spending more on. Almost all training/racing clinchers have flat protection. It does the job. A few cheap tires and a few expensive racing clinchers don't have flat protection, and get more flats.

    Consider this in addition to the post above - they won't help you if your rim strips are screwed up, or you don't remove the piece of debris that caused a puncture.

    I think getting a shop tuneup is a great idea. It's easier to learn to maintain a well-functioning bike than to learn to tune a poorly functioning bike. If you have to do it yourself, check out parktool.com. Well-illustrated instructions for everything.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think nice tires are worth spending more on. Almost all training/racing clinchers have flat protection. It does the job. A few cheap tires and a few expensive racing clinchers don't have flat protection, and get more flats.

    Consider this in addition to the post above - they won't help you if your rim strips are screwed up, or you don't remove the piece of debris that caused a puncture.

    I think getting a shop tuneup is a great idea. It's easier to learn to maintain a well-functioning bike than to learn to tune a poorly functioning bike. If you have to do it yourself, check out parktool.com. Well-illustrated instructions for everything.
    Ok perfect! So i will definitely look into some higher quality tires after a tuneup... as long as things look well.

    I usually like to spend more money on quality everything so this post helps me to give my wife a reason to spend more money.

    Also, great advice on the well/ poorly functioning bike... that should go in the 10 pieces of good advice thread here if it isnt.

    I will keep the parktool website in my bookmark for references later. thanks again!

    --------
    Oh and what do you guys think about getting parts... i will probably ask this in another thread later, But We have performance bike in my area which is the cheapest as well as REI, agees, and some local ones.

    I have looked at nashbar, and amazon is always on my list of places to shop. Any other favorites?

  7. #7
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    I buy almost everything from local one-off shops. For disclosure, I have a couple pairs of cycling shorts with one shop's name on 'em, and don't pay retail.

    jensonusa.com is another well-regarded web site. I don't think I've ever bought there. I got my shifters at the backcountry.com sister site that does road cycling stuff.

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