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  1. #1
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    New rider about to purchase used Cannondale CAAD4 Help

    Hi everyone!

    I'm very new to cycling, but am about to pull the trigger on a used bike from a friend of mine. The bike is a Cannondale CAAD4 frame and the components are all Shimano 105. The tires on it are also fairly new. I can tell is has been really taken care of and I am really enjoying riding it. He's asking $450 and I just want to make sure that it isn't too much. My plan is to ride this for a while and if I really get into the sport I can get something more expensive and then use this as a backup.



  2. #2
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    The obvious question is "how does it fit you?"

    That stem/bar/lever setup is hurting to my eyes. Together with the saddle position, it looks like the current owner doesn't like the fit too much.

    Looks like nice wheels.

    These are solid frames. 25mm tires help the ride.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  3. #3
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    It fits me perfect being a 58cm bike and I'm 6'2. The previous owner was a tad too short for a 58cm (which it is) so he's going to be going to a 56.

    I actually had someone help me adjust it for my body and the set up isn't nearly as awkward. I'm just very new to real cycling as opposed to spin class and wanted to see thoughts on the price for this frame and components.

  4. #4
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    that is a weird set up.
    Flip the stem and level the bars and hoods.

    Go ride hard and a lot!!!
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  5. #5
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    The bars and hoods are now level, that was my bad when trying to fit myself for it. What does "flipping the stem" accomplish?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquirrelMaster0 View Post
    The bars and hoods are now level, that was my bad when trying to fit myself for it. What does "flipping the stem" accomplish?
    Flipping the stem lowers the handlebar. You may or may not be flexible enough to use that stem flipped since it has a pretty steep angle. You can try it though. It will make you (and the bike) look like a bad a.s.s ;)
    My other chainring is a 39...
    Strava profile

  7. #7
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquirrelMaster0 View Post
    What does "flipping the stem" accomplish?
    It'll lower your handlebar. As ph0enix mentioned, that stem has a pretty steep angle. As you can see, stem come in different angles and can be flipped in either direction. The greater the angle, the greater the change will be if you flip it. If you're going to do this yourself, go to youtube and watch a video on how to adjust your stem. It's CRITICAL.
    Search for "stem adjustment"


  8. #8
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    Back to the OP's original question (aesthetics seem to have got in the way of it)...is the bike worth $450.00?

    The bike is fairly old as they are up to CAAD10 frames now and bikes tend to depreciate at a fast rate until they reach a point where it levels off.

    If the frame and components are in excellent shape for it's age, it hasn't been ridden a ton and it fits...then it's worth it. However, if it has been ridden hard or the components are showing a fair amount of wear that might need replacing sometime soon...you might want to offer a little less knowing you may have to spend some money to keep it up and running.

    From the picture...it looks to be in good shape, but looks can be deceiving on the internet
    Bikes:
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  9. #9
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    Yes, I was not too wanting to get into the "value" issue.

    If everything is in really good shape, then it's a fine starter bike.

    If I'm not mistaken the CAAD 4's were the last of the 1" quill stem forks. So, if I'm correct that's some kind of ugly quill stem or adapter we are looking at.

    On the good side, i'm the same height as OP and also have a 58cm CAAD. So I'm guessing you can probably make it fit.

    On further reflection, I'd be looking at new alternatives, for a little more money. This is 12 years old which is a long time in bike years.

    Not a fan of Shimano 9-spd lever shape.
    Last edited by bikerjulio; 04-17-2012 at 04:27 PM.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    If I'm not mistaken the CAAD 4's were the last of the 1" quill stem forks. So, if I'm correct that's some kind of ugly quill stem or adapter we are looking at.
    Actually...My wife has a CAAD4 Cannondale and it's got a 1 1/8" fork/stem on it...so it could be dependent on when in the year it was built.

    Looking at the photo it doesn't look like a 1" fork, nor a quill stem.
    Bikes:
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  11. #11
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    I have had a number of cannondale road bikes through the years and the main improvement has been ride comfort. The frame weights have not changed much since the 2.8. I personally feel that the comfort can be addressed by proper tire pressure for your weight. Bottom line: if its in good mechanical condition with low mileage and the shifters are not gunked up, buy it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookiebiker View Post
    Actually...My wife has a CAAD4 Cannondale and it's got a 1 1/8" fork/stem on it...so it could be dependent on when in the year it was built.

    Looking at the photo it doesn't look like a 1" fork, nor a quill stem.
    I stand corrected

    Cannondale Bicycle Corp. - R800 Double
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the help guys.

  14. #14
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    Prior to finding this bike I was looking at the Felt F85 which seems to be a good beginner bike too. Overall, I think the Cannondale would be a better purchase though. The Cannondale has all around Shimano 105 components where as the Felt has some 105 and then Microshift for the rest. Buying a bike is harder than buying a car.

    Felt Spec

    Frame Felt Road custom 7005 superlight butted smooth welded aluminum, external cable routing, forged aluminum dropouts & replaceable rear derailleur hanger, 1317g

    Fork Felt UHC Performance carbon fiber fork, aluminum Controltaper 1.125"" --> 1.5"" steerer tube, crown, & dropouts
    Headset FSA Orbit C-40-cup 1.125"" --> 1.5"" integrated, w/ aluminum 15mm conical spacer, 2 X 10mm aluminum headset Spacer, 1 x 5mm aluminum headset spacer, Felt Tornado top cap & 2024 anodized aluminum bolt

    DRIVETRAIN
    Crankset FSA Tempo Compact 3pc, 50/34T; 48cm=165mm, 51cm=170mm, 54cm-56cm=172.5mm, 58cm-61cm=175mm
    Cassette SunRace 11-25T
    Bottom Bracket FSA 68mm w/ forged Cr-Mo square taper 110.5mm spindle
    Front Derailleur Micro.shift 34.9mm clamp
    Rear Derailleur Shimano 105 SS short cage
    Shifters Micro.shift integrated shifter/brake lever
    Chain SunRace 10 speed

  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquirrelMaster0 View Post
    Prior to finding this bike I was looking at the Felt F85 which seems to be a good beginner bike too. Overall, I think the Cannondale would be a better purchase though. The Cannondale has all around Shimano 105 components where as the Felt has some 105 and then Microshift for the rest. Buying a bike is harder than buying a car.
    The components don't directly compare. The Felt is a 10sp so it's relatively new compared to the Cannondale correct? Most components use trickle down technology. So 105 comonents of today would be equal or better than Ultegra/Dura Ace of years ago (like the Cannondale). The technology used in Ultegra/Dura Ace of today will be in the 105's in a few years.

    What's the price on the Felt? It is the better bike. But not necessarily better for you both price and function wise.

    Do you know the condition of the Cannondale drivetrain? You said the bike was well taken care of. But with an older bike, does it have lots of miles on it? Has the chain been regularly changed? If not, and if it has excessive wear, in the near future you could be looking at a new chain, cassette, and chain rings which would cost quite a bit.
    I'd suggest checking the chain for wear. This can be done on the bike with a tape measure. This explains how.
    Slow Riders- now even slower: Measuring Chain Wear using a 12-Inch Ruler

  16. #16
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    The felt is about 1k brand new vs $450 for the cannondale.

    I am going to check the condition of the drivetrain when I get home though.

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