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  1. #1
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Except for that stem. That's the ugliest thing that I've ever seen.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostPixels View Post
    Except for that stem. That's the ugliest thing that I've ever seen.
    It's Cannondale's answer to the Roubaix. Or vice-versa. These are good bikes for guys/gals that can't be in an aggressive race position for hours on end.

    What bothers me is the continued marketing of the disc brakes. I don't think it's catching on. I think there are 2 riders of the 190+ rider field at the Tour on disc brakes, that is telling. I was at my LBS and I asked the sales rep (this is a Cannondale and Specialized dealer, so you know they have plenty of disc brake-equipped road bikes) how their disc sales are faring, and she said very little interest.

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  4. #4
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    Synapse Cannondale Bicycles

    The "Midnight" 105 version and "Acid Green" Ultegra versions look pretty nice.

    It's very comparable to the Trek Domane SL Disc 105 and the Roubaix Elite:

    Synapse Carbon Disc 105 Cannondale Bicycles

    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...rCode=grey_red

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...x-elite/115487

    It would be interesting to see if Cannondale was able to achieve a similar level of comfort without the Isospeed or Future shock and to compare the acceleration and climbing chops on the three bikes.
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 07-10-2017 at 11:36 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  5. #5
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    They also offer one rim brake bike. Trek provides you with a rim or disc brake choice at almost every level. Specialized is all in on discs as well for their endurance bikes.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  6. #6
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    wonder why they ditched the curved seat stays

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Specialized is all in on discs as well for their endurance bikes.
    Just not wise, in my opinion. Once you buy a disc-rigged bike, you're committed to disc wheels only for upgrades and you can't use those wheels on your other road bikes (or even CX bikes) assuming they're rim brake-equipped. It's fun to swap wheels among the bikes in your fleet or upgrade, etc. I can see why discs are a good choice if you live in a mountainous area with lots of descents, but otherwise ...

    2016 SuperSix Evo HM Team
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  8. #8
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    I own two bikes with discs, and two bikes with rim brakes.

    I was fairly non-committal on discs until I actually spent some time on them. Now that I have two seasons on discs, I won't be buying another rim brake bike. And any future wheel purchases will be disc wheels with convertible hubs. 160mm front rotor and 140mm rear as well.

  9. #9
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    I like the hidden fender mounts.



    The straight seat stays look weird on this bike.

    The geometry is very similar.

    The rim brake one on offer is the previous generation, only disc on this new generation.




    Not for me, will continue to enjoy the curvy stayed rim brake one.

    My frame is 935g, so 950g or whatever is pretty good with the fender mounts and disc brake layups and paint and such. Probably quite stiff too, I think the last one is said to be stiffer than the evo. Power pyramid and all of that jazz.

    A lot of people will probably like it, solid bike.

    Oh, the bars and stem? Uh... Well... They're not one piece at least. I hear they're comfortable in the hands (the tops). Again though not for me. Standard cockpit here please.

    use a torque wrench

  10. #10
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    The New Synapse Looks Good

    I like this and will have to give it a demo. I'm leaning towards the new emonda SLR, and yes with discs because I do live in a mountainous region and once had a tire overheat and blow off...


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  11. #11
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    Has anyone had an opportunity to see one of these in person or test ride one yet?
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Has anyone had an opportunity to see one of these in person or test ride one yet?
    Unless somebody has ridden one at a press release, then I would think not. They are not even due to start shipping to dealers until about a month from now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Unless somebody has ridden one at a press release, then I would think not. They are not even due to start shipping to dealers until about a month from now.
    You might be surprised by how resourceful some of the folks on here can be. Some of them work at and/or own bike shops and others have contacts within the industry that often result in early test rides, early delivery, etc.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by zosocane View Post
    It's Cannondale's answer to the Roubaix. Or vice-versa. These are good bikes for guys/gals that can't be in an aggressive race position for hours on end.

    What bothers me is the continued marketing of the disc brakes. I don't think it's catching on. I think there are 2 riders of the 190+ rider field at the Tour on disc brakes, that is telling. I was at my LBS and I asked the sales rep (this is a Cannondale and Specialized dealer, so you know they have plenty of disc brake-equipped road bikes) how their disc sales are faring, and she said very little interest.
    Even the most so called 'relaxed' endurance bikes are anything but comfortable if you're going to be doing 4+, 5+ hours on a bike. Having said that a more aggressive position whereby the rider is more dedicated on all fours is a more comfortable position in principle than a sit up and beg position of relaxed bikes. Seems like a total gimmick to me. And if you're going to be doing those kind of hours on a bike then the very concept of endurance becomes pointless. Furthermore you couldn't just put in 4, 5+ hours on a bike from the get go without any sort of physical condition tapering. Regardless if its an endurance or full-on bike.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horze View Post
    Even the most so called 'relaxed' endurance bikes are anything but comfortable if you're going to be doing 4+, 5+ hours on a bike. Having said that a more aggressive position whereby the rider is more dedicated on all fours is a more comfortable position in principle than a sit up and beg position of relaxed bikes. Seems like a total gimmick to me. And if you're going to be doing those kind of hours on a bike then the very concept of endurance becomes pointless. Furthermore you couldn't just put in 4, 5+ hours on a bike from the get go without any sort of physical condition tapering. Regardless if its an endurance or full-on bike.
    I agree 100% that you have to build up to long distance/endurance riding, but some people clearly benefit from having a taller headtube, shorter top tube, lower bottom bracket, longer chainstays, and more compliance, etc. Even if those improvements are subtle (5-15mm or so), it can make a pretty big difference for the person that struggles with neck or back pain, needs/prefers a more stable bike on descents, gets beat up by too much feedback from the road due to prior injuries or age, is less flexible, needs to take as much pressure as possible off of the soft tissue in the genital area, etc. These bikes are some of the most popular from a sales perspective for a reason and it's not all hype in my opinion. They are not for everybody, but they simply work better for some folks.
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 07-24-2017 at 08:58 AM.
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  16. #16
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  17. #17
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    I agree 100% that you have to build up to long distance/endurance riding, but some people clearly benefit from having a taller headtube, shorter top tube, lower bottom bracket, longer chainstays, and more compliance, etc. Even if those improvements are subtle (5-15mm or so), it can make a pretty big difference for the person that struggles with neck or back pain, needs/prefers a more stable bike on descents, gets beat up by too much feedback from the road due to prior injuries or age, is less flexible, needs to take as much pressure as possible off of the soft tissue in the genital area, etc. These bikes are some of the most popular from a sales perspective for a reason and it's not all hype in my opinion. They are not for everybody, but they simply work better for some folks.
    I totally agree. The idea posted above that claims the endurance bikes have no real substance is complete nonsense.

    There are very real and material differences in the geometry (for ride quality of the bike as well as comfort for the rider ). The basic position of contact point for the rider relieve stress on the neck, hands, and neck to make it more likely to survive longer with less fatigue when compared to a "race" bike.

    Couple that comfort aspect with the general trend of making the bike more compliant (via things like Isospeed, Futureshock, etc.) over less than perfect roads and you get a bike that is tangibly more comfortable to rider longer in the saddle.

    Yes, you have to work up to longer hours in the saddle. That is not completely removed even with a proper endurance bike, but it sure makes it easier than a more aggressive design.

  19. #19
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    Last edited by Rashadabd; 07-25-2017 at 10:05 AM.
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  20. #20
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    I just talked to local shop and they reportedly have some 2018's in. I plan to stop by on the way home from work to take a peek. I will try to update on what I see and think tonight.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  21. #21
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    A more upright position doesn't necessarily mean more comfort. In fact less so because it moves a greater amount of weight on your backside and little else. It is like sitting on a chair. Such a position won't alleviate any pressure on 'soft tissue' as you put it. It could make it worse in fact. And indeed for those with aches and pains there is always a reason for it. Just fitting an endurance bike won't just solve the problem overnight.
    Yes any bike could do with a lower BB, endurance or otherwise.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horze View Post
    A more upright position doesn't necessarily mean more comfort. In fact less so because it moves a greater amount of weight on your backside and little else. It is like sitting on a chair. Such a position won't alleviate any pressure on 'soft tissue' as you put it. It could make it worse in fact. And indeed for those with aches and pains there is always a reason for it. Just fitting an endurance bike won't just solve the problem overnight.
    Yes any bike could do with a lower BB, endurance or otherwise.
    Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, I suppose, but this is consistent with my experience and the advice I have received from a number of experienced riders and bike fitters. At the end of the day, to each his own though:

    What is the difference between a road race and endurance/gran fondo bike?

    https://roadcyclinguk.com/gear/buyer...nce-bikes.html

    Nine best endurance bikes 2017: a buying guide - Cycling Weekly

    24 of the best 2017 sportive bikes — great bikes for long, fast endurance rides in comfort | road.cc
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 07-31-2017 at 04:29 AM.
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  23. #23
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    ^^ Those are just definitions. They don't explain why one type is more comfortable over another. Rest assured that there are plenty of writers in the industry who are quite uninformed as it is.

  24. #24
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    I'll chime in quick with some experience on the endurance thing.

    I own an outright race bike with a horizontal top tube, 31.6 seatpost, tight and sharp.

    I own a Synapse as well. Pretty much the opposite.

    The thing is, it doesn't matter what the geometry of the bike is, I will fit it the same. My handlebar stack and reach will be identical. My saddle will be in the identical place relative to the bottom bracket.

    So on the Synapse my front end setup is more aggressive than Sagan's at the same size frame. But on the race bike there's 16mm of spacer under the shorter stem. Synapse has a seatpost a mile long while the race bike's is about 6 inches.

    The frames offer different levels of compliance/comfort. The Synapse wins. Long and thin seatposts make a difference. I don't know about the Save Plus this and that and whatever, but maybe that adds in too.

    As for endurance bikes and endurance fits... rubbish. Sitting upright is less comfortable to me, causes all kinds of pains. It's also less aerodynamic and slower, makes zero sense for longer rides. Opposite really. For real short commutes, okay, sit upright on your padded saddle like they do in western Europe. But for long rides, it's about being low and comfortable for me, opposite of "endurance" positioning.

    Endurance bike? Fine, I like comfort and stability. Endurance position? Backwards nonsense to me.
    use a torque wrench

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    MMsRepBike- I think your response makes the most sense to me. I am looking for a bike that offers a comfortable ride without sacrificing my aggressive position, which I feel is very efficient. I think my fit will be pushing the limits of the Synapse's adjustability, but is possible. Unfortunately the current wait time for one of the new bikes with their Save System cockpit is into October! My local shop did just take delivery of a 105 equipped bike in my size though, so I'm going to head over there and see how close I can set it up to my current bike, just to be sure on fitting before I order one. They have the Synapse Carbon Disc with 105 on it, frame is a beautiful midnight blue metal flake with neon yellow logo and accents.

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