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  1. #1
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    Where is Cannondale made?

    I would like to know where the Cannondale bike is made now?

  2. #2
    extremely biased
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    which one?

    Starnut

  3. #3
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    Me too、、、、、、
    it's side all the frame mark with "handmade in USA" are made in USA, it's true?

  4. #4
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    if it says that on the frame, then it's one of the ones made in the US.

    Starnut

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=STARNUT]which one?

    Starnut[/QUOTE

    SIX CARBON...

  6. #6
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    if you look at the 09 catalog there is nothing saying "handmade in USA" on the frame. but im just comparing the six carbon frames to the CAAD frames. CAAD has it, six does not. in my other thread, someone mention that the six was made in Taiwan or something along those lines.

  7. #7
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    The only US made road frames are the CAAD, Synapse alloy, and the Super. Everything else is asian, including the Six.


    Starnut

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by STARNUT
    The only US made road frames are the CAAD, Synapse alloy, and the Super. Everything else is asian, including the Six.


    Starnut
    Starnut, perhaps you have some intell on this, but my LBS manager told me this past weekend that even the 08 SuperSix frame was largely made in Asia, but part of it was completed in Bedford so that there was enough of a US nexus to claim HANDMADE IN USA. He also said that starting next year all of the Cannondale frames (including SuperSix) will be made in Asia.

    Anyone heard something similar?

  9. #9
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    the super six liquigas edition has the american flag near the drop outs on the fork and it says made in the usa on the seat stays.
    My criteria compared to your career just isn't fair.

  10. #10
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    I believe my CAAD7 is really "Handmade in the USA"

  11. #11
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    No...

    Cannondale has a big freezer where they keep the raw carbon for the Supers. They are made there.

    It's getting to the point where if you buy carbon, and it ain't made in Asia, you got ripped off. Trek and the big C are the only "stock" manufacturers left in the US.

    I do know that the cost of building the CAADs has gone way way way up and one of the reasons the Systems were axed was because of the cost of production. It's one reason, not the only.

    This begs the question; would you (as in everyone) buy a Cannondale if it was made in Asia? If Cannonadle's highend road frame was suddenly being produced in Asia and (this is important) it was a significant improvement over the previous generation, would you buy it? As in, they moved production for manufacturing prowess and quality as well as price. Not simply as a means to decrease price at the expense of quality...................


    We shall see........

    Starnut

  12. #12
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    I like this...

    ...with the little star
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by STARNUT
    This begs the question; would you (as in everyone) buy a Cannondale if it was made in Asia? If Cannonadle's highend road frame was suddenly being produced in Asia and (this is important) it was a significant improvement over the previous generation, would you buy it? As in, they moved production for manufacturing prowess and quality as well as price. Not simply as a means to decrease price at the expense of quality
    Put another way, would we buy Specialized? If Cannondale made their top shelf racer in Asia AND they innovated with something new that is trend-setting (and C has a history of trend-setting) AND they continued lifetime, no-hassle warranty on frame AND the price stayed the same, I would probably stick with C, out of loyalty and for love of the brand, if nothing else.

    Having said that, if Trek is the last of the Mohicans, I would be drawn by the "Built in USA" tag that Trek is now putting on their top racing bikes.

  14. #14
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    I don't care where it's a made. A good product is a good product.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by STARNUT
    No...

    Cannondale has a big freezer where they keep the raw carbon for the Supers. They are made there.

    It's getting to the point where if you buy carbon, and it ain't made in Asia, you got ripped off. Trek and the big C are the only "stock" manufacturers left in the US.

    I do know that the cost of building the CAADs has gone way way way up and one of the reasons the Systems were axed was because of the cost of production. It's one reason, not the only.

    This begs the question; would you (as in everyone) buy a Cannondale if it was made in Asia? If Cannonadle's highend road frame was suddenly being produced in Asia and (this is important) it was a significant improvement over the previous generation, would you buy it? As in, they moved production for manufacturing prowess and quality as well as price. Not simply as a means to decrease price at the expense of quality...................


    We shall see........

    Starnut

    Great question STARNUT. My answer is yes. The high-end Cannondale mountainbikes are already made overseas and I have no problem buying those so why would the rest of their line be any different.
    '08 Cannondale Scalpel Team
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fornaca68
    Put another way, would we buy Specialized? If Cannondale made their top shelf racer in Asia AND they innovated with something new that is trend-setting (and C has a history of trend-setting) AND they continued lifetime, no-hassle warranty on frame AND the price stayed the same, I would probably stick with C, out of loyalty and for love of the brand, if nothing else.

    Having said that, if Trek is the last of the Mohicans, I would be drawn by the "Built in USA" tag that Trek is now putting on their top racing bikes.
    Let's not talk about Specialized, that's a who different ball of crazy. C and S are not in the same area code.


    So assuming all conditions are met you'd have no issue with it?

    IF you were to buy a Trek at that point it would sound as if you would be able to justify buy a bike that is less stiff, heavier, and by all measures a little "less" of a bike, simply because it's American made?

    I don't want to start the whole "american made" BS but it's always been a Cannondale stock and trade, while the big S was the 1st to go to Asia.

    Do it make it less of a "Cannondale" if it's Asian.


    For the record, I say ney................. if it has a C on the headtube, it's a Cannondale.

    Starnut

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rizz
    I don't care where it's a made. A good product is a good product.


  18. #18
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    buy American

    Your job depends on it.

    If you cant see that now you never will.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by STARNUT
    I don't want to start the whole "american made" BS but it's always been a Cannondale stock and trade, while the big S was the 1st to go to Asia.
    Mike Sinyard is all about increasing profits/cutting overhead, so the fact that Specialized went to Asia first doesn't bother me per se. Look, Specialized makes good bikes, so does Trek, so does Cannondale. With the exception of the CAAD9 and the SuperSix, all of C's product line is made in Asia. It's inevitable (especially with the new Canadian ownership) that all of C's product line eventually will be made abroad. The top-end Madone eventually will be made in Asia too.

    The key for me is that on the R&D side Cannondale remain ahead of the pack in terms of innovation. To date they have done that. Example, there is a new trend to go with beefy downtubes and oversize headtubes. Credit that to C, where clearly Specialized followed C's lead on the SystemSix when designing the new S-Works. Also, more frames are going BB30. Credit, again, to C.

  20. #20
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    A few years ago it was production moved overseas, now we see R&D being moved to as well, prices haven't fallen on the product so where is the benefit to the consumer?

    It seems that there's a bit of de-branding of 'Handmade in USA' that's been going on at Cannondale for the past couple of years.

    Even frames that are made the US do not display the 'Handmade in USA' as much as they did in the past, text has gotten smaller.

    Personally I think that if Cannondale goes away from the US manufacturing they lost quite a bit of cashe.


    This is a complex issue, one country can't produce everything is uses but I'm not in favor of moving our manufacturing base oversees either.

    When a company starts to reduce cost to a primary way of driving share holder value it seems like it has lost its way....... I don't want to reward a company with my dollars for that.

    So it matters where and how I spend my money....

  21. #21
    your text here
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    i just got a used CAAD7 frame and one of the reasons i bought C was because it was undeniably made in the USA.
    I don't normally "do people." - Dr. Roebuck

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoehnt
    buy American

    Your job depends on it.

    If you cant see that now you never will.

    I wrote this lyric 20 years ago and still find myself singing it regularly:

    It is not the consumer's responsibility
    to ensure the financial solvency
    of domestic manufacturing industry
    in the absence of competitive quality


    "Buy American"? Screw that. Buy Quality Product, now there's a maxim I can get behind. If it happens to be a quality product that's made in America, wonderful.

  23. #23
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    Setting aside the term "Made in ...." or "Handmade in ..." since "made" is not a universally defined term in bicycling manufacturing to my knowledge, many people do care where their products are made and that is their primary reason for buying them. Whether other people feel that those kinds of opinions are "right" or legitimate is another story. No one is in a position to judge other people's opinions. Saying "I like to buy American made bikes" without a qualifying statement is like saying "I like red bikes." No one can argue with that.

    However, if one says, "I like American bikes because they're better made than those made in Taiwan or China" then that is no longer a pure opinion, but an argument based on an allegation of a fact that can be refuted with other facts, or allegations of fact.

    I don't think anyone here is stating that American made bikes are better than Chinese made bikes, so there really shouldn't be a debate here.

  24. #24
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    I too am concerned about the manufacturing base leaving the US. Why can it not be that part of shareholder value is retaining manufacturing presence at HOME, the United States, rather than just all profits?

    If you were investing in a company, is it all about your ROI, or is there something else you look for? I would bet that the more intelligent in the crowd here are looking at other things, with ROI just being a big one of those things. I'd love to invest in a profitable business here in the US that makes things and sells things in the US. If there are ways it can increase its profitability by innovating or, egads!, moving some processes offshore, then that's ok too.

    But if everything Cannondale makes is made elsewhere, then it's not an American company anymore. Heck, it's already owned by the Canadians !

    By the way, I still proudly ride a CAAD 8 with that big beautiful American Flag on it.
    If confronted by a mountain lion, it's best to pretend to be as big as possible. But not big as in important, ie, "Do You Know Who I Am?".

  25. #25
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    Yes, it is a more than a bit depressing to not see the "Handmade in USA" on nearly all 2009 Cannondales. Bicycles are not computers, or for that matter, not like cars. I would venture to guess that most people who buy Mercedes M-Class SUV's don't care (or even know) that they're made and assembled in Alabama, not in Germany To them it's still a Mercedes Benz, no matter where the chassis is manufactured, where the wheels come from etc. With bicycles, many of us appreciate the minute details that go into a bike, from who makes the components, who makes the frames, where it is made, frame geometry and fit (people wouldn't be talking about it or have created a forum about cycling if there wasn't an interest). In other words, a bicycle is more personal, and in some respects, it is a reflection and an extension of us. So, for many of us, we care about what our bikes are (including where they're made). Many people take pride in owning an American made bike (at least frame anyway).

    I own and have owned bikes made in Taiwan, Italy, and China. When I sell those, I'd like to get a Cannondale, probably a used six13, for various reasons, as opposed to its replacement, the Six, partly because they are not made in the US any longer. Another reason is that Cannondale prided itself in the six13 in being different in the carbon and aluminum frame market as not taking the cost-effective way out by simply making an aluminum front end bonded to a carbon rear triangle. The 2009 Six does just that. Whether the carbon rear end/aluminum top, down and headtubes translates into a similar ride to the six13, perhaps someone here can say. As aesthetics go (yes that too is important), I hope that some people may agree with me that the new Six's and Six Carbons, don't look like the six13's, and a bit less like a Cannondale. There is a bit too much top tube slope. Who would have thought if you wanted an affordable new US made Cannondale, you have to look at the entry level CAAD9?

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