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  1. #1
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    Endurance road bike and neck/shoulder pain

    I bought a new road bike late last summer. It's a Scott Solace and my old bike was a Lynskey Coopercx cross bike. I made the switch because I assumed that the taller head tube and carbon frame would yield a more comfortable ride. I never found the Lynskey to be as comfy as I thought a TI bike should be but it was not terrible. I was just ready for a change. I now have neck/shoulder and hand soreness that I did not have as bad nor as soon from the Lynskey. I've read a bit about that kind of pain and the main suggestion is to raise the bars. My bars are definitely higher on the Scott than they were on the Lynskey. Any Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I'm surprised there are no answers to the post. I am no coach - but I would guess the bike was set up using the measurements from your old bike. Likely this was a mistake due to the different geometries. Did you get a comprehensive bike fit when you got the new bike?

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I never noticed the post or would have responded - not a coach or fitter either but I would suggest having the new bike set up the same. Bar height is one part of the equation, but reach and saddle height / position are too. If the stem is longer or saddle is farther back you are stretch out more and that could cause problems.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bangacan View Post
    I bought a new road bike late last summer. It's a Scott Solace and my old bike was a Lynskey Coopercx cross bike. I made the switch because I assumed that the taller head tube and carbon frame would yield a more comfortable ride. I never found the Lynskey to be as comfy as I thought a TI bike should be but it was not terrible. I was just ready for a change. I now have neck/shoulder and hand soreness that I did not have as bad nor as soon from the Lynskey. I've read a bit about that kind of pain and the main suggestion is to raise the bars. My bars are definitely higher on the Scott than they were on the Lynskey. Any Thoughts?
    Not to sound like a jerk but you made the wrong assumption (as your experience shows). Not to say that's not the case as a rule but not necessarily so. Take me for example, my hands hurt if I ride a totally upright hybrid for any more than, say, 10 miles yet don't feel a thing riding a really aggressive road bike for 100.

    FYI a lot of comfort comes from the tires and the PSI you use. I'd suggest hooking up with a good bike fitter and if there's room for more cushy tires, us it.

    It's not as simple as "move the bars up to take pressure off hands". Reach and saddle height as mentioned already are also big factors as is engaging your back/core to support some body weight (as opposed to resting it all on your hands). Fit is first and foremost but some core strengthening may be in order too.
    Good luck.

  5. #5
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    You are correct. I set it up as close as I could to my old bike as the geometries seemed similar. Fitting at the shop was not a great option because it was REI. It used to be a great shop managed by a custom frame builder and former NORBA mechanic. Now it's like you would expect REI to be.

    I have recently raised saddle height, moved it forward and dropped the handlebar. All in small increments at a time. This feels a lot better! I do want to have someone check the basic measurements though just to see where I am at.

  6. #6
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    Yep. Makes sense. Like I said in a different reply ive made some adjustments that have helped a lot. As far as tires I run Schwalbe One tires with latex tubes at 90-100 psi in the rear and 80-90 in the front depending on mood and condition of roads ridden that day.

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