Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 41 of 41
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,113
    Quote Originally Posted by NickGroves View Post
    Huh, then why the timing system if its not a race?
    Bragging rights!
    If your not in the lead group, you are out of the 'race'. From your OP it looks like you will not be in the lead group. Therefore who are you racing, some other back marker?

    I keep track of all my rides and that includes the time.... does that mean they are races? No, but a method of comparing one's effort to... past efforts, others you know efforts, others in your age group, etc. But I wouldn't call them a race.

    That being said I will be racing in the 'tour de tuscon', come on down for the 104 miles & we'll see. But I will never call it a 'race' for me, that is way out of my league.
    BANNED

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    163
    Timing segments became really popular with the rise of strava. You get time segments in running events too. You can see how you do against friends or other people who do a similar type of riding.

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Bragging rights!
    If your not in the lead group, you are out of the 'race'. From your OP it looks like you will not be in the lead group. Therefore who are you racing, some other back marker?

    I keep track of all my rides and that includes the time.... does that mean they are races? No, but a method of comparing one's effort to... past efforts, others you know efforts, others in your age group, etc. But I wouldn't call them a race.

    That being said I will be racing in the 'tour de tuscon', come on down for the 104 miles & we'll see. But I will never call it a 'race' for me, that is way out of my league.
    So because i dont finish in the lead group its not a race? Huh.... guess i better just stay home then.... i see your mentality... i guess you better stay home too then....

    To me, going for 1st or 30th, its a race to beat the person in front of you or behind you.

    And i to keep track of my rides and times.. its called progression....

    And what exactly are you going to show me in tucson? That you're faster than me? Id sure hope so if ive only been riding for a short time.

    Take your negativity elsewhere.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,113
    I believe you are the one that is negative, and turning the tour of scottsdale into a 'race' for a casual rider is crazy.
    BANNED

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I believe you are the one that is negative, and turning the tour of scottsdale into a 'race' for a casual rider is crazy.
    Lol, how am i being negative? Im over here trying to push myself and do better, and all you can say is its not a race because i wont be finishing in the lead pack among other things. Like you're trying to discurage me from doing it before i even try it! Hahahaha. Yeah nice try...

  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by NickGroves View Post
    Lol, how am i being negative? Im over here trying to push myself and do better, and all you can say is its not a race because i wont be finishing in the lead pack among other things. Like you're trying to discurage me from doing it before i even try it! Hahahaha. Yeah nice try...
    I don't think that anyone here is trying to discourage you from doing your race. I think that people are trying to help you understand the difference between a timed event and a race.

    A race requires a license and is a mass start event (except for time trials). I a race, riders are broken down into categories based on experience and age (Elite is 16 and over, Master's start at 30 and are also divided by category, junior is under 18). For men, categories on the road start at 5 and you move down with experience. For example you could race a CAT (category) 5 (beginner) race and maybe a 35+ 4/5 which requires you to be a category 4 or 5 and be at least 35 or older.

    Timed events can have a mass start but are generally will start when you cross the start line. They are broken down into age groups, gender, sometime location. It is your time to complete the course or climb, or a specific segment of the route. You can then compare your time to other people and some events will even have a prize for the top few finishers in each event.

    They are both fun and I think you should experiment with different ones. I think it's great that you are doing this event. It's great motivation to keep training and I think you will have fun.

    If you decide to look at "racing" you will need to get a race license through USA cycling. Timed events are generally more expensive but will include a "goodie bag" when you check in. A race is typically 30-45 dollars, you only get a number when you check in and you are not always allowed to finish (if you get too far back they will ask you to stop to avoid problems with other racers that may be behind you or in a criterium to ensure the field doesn't encounter you again).

    I am guessing that you are in AZ so here is the link to the local racing association. ABRA

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by doctormike View Post
    I don't think that anyone here is trying to discourage you from doing your race. I think that people are trying to help you understand the difference between a timed event and a race.

    A race requires a license and is a mass start event (except for time trials). I a race, riders are broken down into categories based on experience and age (Elite is 16 and over, Master's start at 30 and are also divided by category, junior is under 18). For men, categories on the road start at 5 and you move down with experience. For example you could race a CAT (category) 5 (beginner) race and maybe a 35+ 4/5 which requires you to be a category 4 or 5 and be at least 35 or older.

    Timed events can have a mass start but are generally will start when you cross the start line. They are broken down into age groups, gender, sometime location. It is your time to complete the course or climb, or a specific segment of the route. You can then compare your time to other people and some events will even have a prize for the top few finishers in each event.

    They are both fun and I think you should experiment with different ones. I think it's great that you are doing this event. It's great motivation to keep training and I think you will have fun.

    If you decide to look at "racing" you will need to get a race license through USA cycling. Timed events are generally more expensive but will include a "goodie bag" when you check in. A race is typically 30-45 dollars, you only get a number when you check in and you are not always allowed to finish (if you get too far back they will ask you to stop to avoid problems with other racers that may be behind you or in a criterium to ensure the field doesn't encounter you again).

    I am guessing that you are in AZ so here is the link to the local racing association. ABRA
    That simple explination cleared it up, thank you. I guess i will still plan on doing the "timed group ride" as a back marker.. haha

  8. #33
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by NickGroves View Post
    That simple explination cleared it up, thank you. I guess i will still plan on doing the "timed group ride" as a back marker.. haha
    Timed events are a lot of fun and a can be a lot safer than a race. Even though I primarily race, I have done some timed events to get cool medals, for training, and just to do a route that I would never select as a race (a lot of climbing or a distance that is long).

    If you are close to Tuscon, and you are interested in checking out crit racing you should look into this IC3 Tucson Race Team: Criterium Training Series

    They basically teach you how to ride in a crit and how to handle riding in a fast group with lots of cornering. Just know that in crit racing you are going to crash at some point. In road racing you will crash less but it will happen. Time events generally don't have crashes but anytime you are on a bike you could crash.

    Just so you have a reference: I do about 15 crits per year and crash on average 2 times (although I do race multiple fields at each event). I do about 3 road races a year and crash maybe once every ten races. I do about 3 timed events a year and have not crashed there. I do 3-4 time trials a year and have crashed once. I have done 3 team time trials and crashed in two of them.

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by doctormike View Post
    Timed events are a lot of fun and a can be a lot safer than a race. Even though I primarily race, I have done some timed events to get cool medals, for training, and just to do a route that I would never select as a race (a lot of climbing or a distance that is long).

    If you are close to Tuscon, and you are interested in checking out crit racing you should look into this IC3 Tucson Race Team: Criterium Training Series

    They basically teach you how to ride in a crit and how to handle riding in a fast group with lots of cornering. Just know that in crit racing you are going to crash at some point. In road racing you will crash less but it will happen. Time events generally don't have crashes but anytime you are on a bike you could crash.

    Just so you have a reference: I do about 15 crits per year and crash on average 2 times (although I do race multiple fields at each event). I do about 3 road races a year and crash maybe once every ten races. I do about 3 timed events a year and have not crashed there. I do 3-4 time trials a year and have crashed once. I have done 3 team time trials and crashed in two of them.
    I will look into that, im a little over an hour away from tucson.

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,842
    Quote Originally Posted by doctormike View Post
    A race requires a license and is a mass start event (except for time trials). I a race, riders are broken down into categories based on experience and age (Elite is 16 and over, Master's start at 30 and are also divided by category, junior is under 18). For men, categories on the road start at 5 and you move down with experience. For example you could race a CAT (category) 5 (beginner) race and maybe a 35+ 4/5 which requires you to be a category 4 or 5 and be at least 35 or older.
    Elite is Cat 1.

    Juniors is 12-18.

    U23 is 19-22.

    Masters is 35+ in my state and Nationals, I believe.

    Other categories are just those categories.

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,842
    Quote Originally Posted by doctormike View Post

    Just so you have a reference: I do about 15 crits per year and crash on average 2 times (although I do race multiple fields at each event). I do about 3 road races a year and crash maybe once every ten races.
    That's a ridiculous amount of crashes. Holy crap.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    That's a ridiculous amount of crashes. Holy crap.
    I was thinking the same thing. I'm a USACycling Official and have worked many events. Especially Crits and I saw maybe 3 crashes this year out of maybe 50 or more races. If I crashed that much maybe I'd decide to look for something safer. Like swimming. Haha. But then again maybe it's because I'm slooooow.

  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: vetboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    767
    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    That's a ridiculous amount of crashes. Holy crap.
    Quote Originally Posted by lacofdfireman View Post
    I was thinking the same thing. I'm a USACycling Official and have worked many events. Especially Crits and I saw maybe 3 crashes this year out of maybe 50 or more races. If I crashed that much maybe I'd decide to look for something safer. Like swimming. Haha. But then again maybe it's because I'm slooooow.
    Agreed. If I saw the good doctor's name on a start list, I would sit that race out;)

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bahueh's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    19,178
    Quote Originally Posted by NickGroves View Post
    Lol, how am i being negative? Im over here trying to push myself and do better, and all you can say is its not a race because i wont be finishing in the lead pack among other things. Like you're trying to discurage me from doing it before i even try it! Hahahaha. Yeah nice try...
    this is a stupid conversation, and its not your fault. Here's the deal, it's a "race" if there are points awarded and upgrade potential to be had. If not, its a group ride/charity ride/tour ride/gran fondo/whatever ride. A race involves categories and numbers and points and categories. do you have to buy a license or just an entry fee? if there's a license, its a race. If not, its for fun.
    If this is a race, and its 28 miles, it should be over pretty quick. My first race was 20 miles as a Cat. 5 and I barely remember it, but I do remember placing 8th. If its a race, just ride your ass off and make damn sure you have experience riding in a fast group for lengths of time. No one wants shaky, nervous riders who have never done 30mph while drafting, while riding 12" apart at 30mph. No one. Its dangerous for you, its dangerous to them (and its fairly irresponsible to put others at risk due to your lack of inexperience). If its a race, you may get shelled, and you may do just fine, that all depends on your training and your saddle time. the best thing you can do is ride, ride hard, and get into close pack riding situations with local training rides. the rest is trial and error....
    Not banned yet.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    31
    Thank you guys for all of your input, after reading threw everyones responses, im going to just ride, ride, and ride some more and not worry about it. Participate in the event and use the big group atmosphere as a learning experience. Im enjoying riding my bike, and quite honestly.. i want to keep it that way!

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,113
    You got it!

    I did the TdeTuscon Race..... got my dream.... platnum!
    Last edited by duriel; 11-21-2015 at 02:43 PM.
    BANNED

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Training & Race wheelset
    By Zen Cyclery in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-29-2011, 01:43 AM
  2. Training for a race versus training for a century.
    By DalyCityDad in forum Endurance Riding
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-18-2011, 05:31 AM
  3. race HR vs PE, and training HR vs PE
    By bauerb in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 03-18-2007, 11:14 PM
  4. Have a bad race/training day?
    By SkiRacer55 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-11-2005, 02:36 PM
  5. Training for First Race
    By ByronLing in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-16-2004, 07:26 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •