View Poll Results: which baselayer - Patagonia or Underarmour?

Voters
11. You may not vote on this poll
  • Patagonia Capilene 3 (zip)?

    3 27.27%
  • Patagonia Wool 3 (zip)?

    2 18.18%
  • Patagonia R1 Flash Pullover?

    0 0%
  • Underarmour Coldgear (zip)?

    6 54.55%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,630

    Baselayer Poll: Patagonia or UnderArmour

    am looking at picking up a sweet baselayer to add to the collection - will be riding in winter temps 20F/-6C to 50F/10C with lots of wet weather expected

    1. Patagonia Capilene 3 (1/4 zip)
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...MENS.CAPILENE3

    2. Patagonia Wool 3 ((1/4 zip)
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...PBL.MENS.WOOL3

    3. Patagonia R1 Flash Pullover
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...VERS#sku.40104

    4. Underarmour Coldgear (1/4 zip)
    http://www.underarmour.com/ProductDe...&pf_id=1004557

    tell me what I need to know and if I should be looking at something else

    thanks!

  2. #2
    Downhill Juggernaut
    Reputation: Chris H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,677
    Don't own any Patagonio items, however they make great stuff. I can comment on the Under Armour though. I have the longsleeve cold gear quarter zip shirt and I love it. I've worn it in the temp ranges you're looking at and it works great. I especially like the zipper, if I start getting hot it vents the heat out pretty well.

    http://www.underarmour.com/ProductIm...?pf_id=1005557

    Of course, when it's colder it's part of a layered system. Coldest I've been in was in the low teens with a jersey, that shirt, and a windproof/water repellant heavy fleece. Worked great for me. Now that I've finally broken down and gotten fleece full length tights I laugh in winters face! Well... as wintery as it gets here in Texas.
    If running were a person I would try to sabotage their life so that they were poor and drunk and living in the gutter pulling half smoked cigarettes from ashtrays in front of the Target. - Joe Daddio

  3. #3
    Unlabeled
    Reputation: Reynolds531's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    3,735

    cashmere

    Quote Originally Posted by M.J.
    am looking at picking up a sweet baselayer to add to the collection - will be riding in winter temps 20F/-6C to 50F/10C with lots of wet weather expected

    1. Patagonia Capilene 3 (1/4 zip)
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...MENS.CAPILENE3

    2. Patagonia Wool 3 ((1/4 zip)
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...PBL.MENS.WOOL3

    3. Patagonia R1 Flash Pullover
    http://www.patagonia.com/web/us/prod...VERS#sku.40104

    4. Underarmour Coldgear (1/4 zip)
    http://www.underarmour.com/ProductDe...&pf_id=1004557

    tell me what I need to know and if I should be looking at something else

    thanks!
    The best baselayer I've ever found is an old cashmere sweater. Wicks, warm when wet, comfortable over a very wide temperature range.
    Lugged Steel Treks

  4. #4
    I coulda did that myself
    Reputation: Robbie59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    219
    Silk makes a great base layer. Whenever possible, I go with natural fibers. They just feel better to me than synthetics. Although some synthetics are getting to be quite good.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Reputation: Scot_Gore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,404
    When I'm dressing for cold weather active activities I try to go with lighter choices than your selections appear to be. Then add something more akin to the selections in your poll for the colder side of your range on top of that. I like to have jersey pockets, so I almost always have a summer weight jersey as one of my layers.

    Others good choices to add to your shopping list would be North Face, Helly Hanson, or the REI house brand.

    For me, this poll gets answered by "whatever is on sale".

    Frankly I generally pop over to Sierra Trading Post and look for any screaming deal they've got running and don't worry too much about it's brand. I just looked and they've got a Kenyon Poly Base Layer for $10.00.

    Scot
    Scot Gore, Minneapolis

  6. #6
    It's not TOO Cold!
    Reputation: Sledgehammer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,498
    I use Under Armor down to 15F (-10C) Works great with a couple other thin layers above. Below that, it is truck time. The nice thing about the Under Armor is you can wear it when it is significantly warmer too. Last week it was 19 f when I left home, and 55F when I left work in the eveing. Worked Great.

  7. #7
    N. Hollywood, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    745

    ibex

    Have you considered wool? Weve worn our Ibex merino wool base layers from 70F down to below freezing. The wool is very comfortable and does not smell (much) even after wearing for 3 or 4 days. Ibex has an outlet page on their website. Or check Sierra Trading Post for wool undies.

    You may have noticed that Patagonia is now selling wool base layers. I can only assume that they are great given their reputation. Patagonia may also put some effort into explaining when to choose synthetic or wool...

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by Robbie59
    Silk makes a great base layer. Whenever possible, I go with natural fibers. They just feel better to me than synthetics. Although some synthetics are getting to be quite good.
    Really bad advice unless you're going to explicitly exclude cotton.

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: buck-50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,258
    I've got a capaline baselayer shirt and tights. It's really silky-comfortable and it keeps me warm, but I almost never wear it because the second I sweat in it, it begins to stink. Not just a little stink, either- there is something about capaline that turns it into a stink-amplifier.

    I have some wool that's less comfortable but I wear it more often just to avoid the stink issue.

    We're talking eye-watering powerful STANK here...

    Unless you can wash it every night or have a place to keep it hermetically sealed after you've worn it, I'd suggest staying away from capaline.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,630
    wow - never heard about the hidden stank of Capilene - the website says it deals with smell pretty well... looking like underarmour (and (more) cheap sale stuff)

    thanks to all

  11. #11
    It's not TOO Cold!
    Reputation: Sledgehammer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,498

    Stank

    I've got adn Under Armor knock off that has been worn under hockey equipment and it stinks pretty bad too. It is now used just for hockey and the real deal (new stuff) is used for cycling. I just wash all my stuff after each use and, for the most part, not a problem.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by M.J.
    am looking at picking up a sweet baselayer to add to the collection - will be riding in winter temps 20F/-6C to 50F/10C with lots of wet weather expected

    1. Patagonia Capilene 3 (1/4 zip)
    2. Patagonia Wool 3 ((1/4 zip)
    3. Patagonia R1 Flash Pullover
    4. Underarmour Coldgear (1/4 zip)


    tell me what I need to know and if I should be looking at something else

    thanks!
    My Patagonia stuff has been great but I don't have any of their Capilene stuff. Have plenty of other mfgr baselayers though so here are some comments:
    - all man-made fibers (polypropen etc) will pick up the smell sooner or later, now some are of better quality and have some treatment which will keep the smell away (for a while). Craft Pro series can be washed in very hot temps so they are good, some other ones have silver threads in fabric which is supposed keep the smell away.
    - merino wool based baselayers are excellent, feel great even when wet, good ones never get (too) smelly but I think they are not as good wicking for full on sessions (xc skiing) as poly stuff.
    - I like to wear thin layer under jersey year round, one of those thin silky ones from Gore or Assos would be great but I only have noname brand stuff for that - they have slightly coarser materials.
    Last edited by mark_m; 11-14-2006 at 10:48 PM. Reason: spellink

  13. #13
    Do not touch the trim.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,354

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Metsmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by OnTheRivet

    Yes, Craft.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Beekeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    33
    Icebreaker 100% merino is very good as well. It has the added advantage of not getting smelly like synthetic baselayers do.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    61
    My 2c, Stay away from Under armour. I'm just not a fan of it, it is too high priced and holds on to moisture. When I wear it I get soaked and stay wet and then cold. Poly and light fleece garments work very well for me as do Smart Wool products. There are any number of choices as others have pointed out. I have garments manufactured by Voler, PI, Craft, Easter Mtn Sports etc, all are better choices than the UA I have.

    As for the smell issue - I launder my cloths with Arm and Hammer powdered detergent w/o frag or softners. I also make every attempt to hang dry in the sun, nice smell and sunlight is a great sanitizer.

  17. #17
    fat tire rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    59
    Capilene stinks bad.

    I have not used any synthetics since picking up three wool items from Smartwool, Ibex, and Icebreaker.

    They are all good, but the quality of Ibex and Icebreaker is a bit better than the smartwool.

    Just get whatever Merino you can find on sale.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by Spintogrin
    My 2c, Stay away from Under armour. I'm just not a fan of it, it is too high priced and holds on to moisture. When I wear it I get soaked and stay wet and then cold. Poly and light fleece garments work very well for me as do Smart Wool products. There are any number of choices as others have pointed out. I have garments manufactured by Voler, PI, Craft, Easter Mtn Sports etc, all are better choices than the UA I have.

    As for the smell issue - I launder my cloths with Arm and Hammer powdered detergent w/o frag or softners. I also make every attempt to hang dry in the sun, nice smell and sunlight is a great sanitizer.
    +1 about the UnderArmour. I find it doesn't wick all that well. Very overated as a thermal base layer. It does look pretty cool though.
    "The Shill"

  19. #19
    off the back
    Reputation: rufus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    10,675
    Quote Originally Posted by Scot_Gore
    When I'm dressing for cold weather active activities I try to go with lighter choices than your selections appear to be. Then add something more akin to the selections in your poll for the colder side of your range on top of that. I like to have jersey pockets, so I almost always have a summer weight jersey as one of my layers.
    yeah, in my limited experience i'd think that that the Capilene 1 would be the base layer, and then the 3 for the next midweight layer. top that with a light or heavy fleece jersey, and a shell or heavier jacket, depending on just how cold it gets.

    i just ordered a few Polartec Powerdry shirts from LLBean, two silkweights and a midweight, cheaper than the Patagonia stuff, and probably works the same.

    and EMS has a special sale on their Techwick stuff, buy two pieces get 20% off, three and you get 30%. not sure how it measures up, but i did check it out at the local EMS store, and it looked decent. if they're still doing this in the spring, i may pick up some of the lightweight stuff.
    Eff the King's Guard. Eff the city. Eff the King.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,630
    looks like someone else was wondering the same thing...

    http://outside.away.com/outside/gear.../20061113.html

  21. #21
    I coulda did that myself
    Reputation: Robbie59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    219
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffS
    Really bad advice unless you're going to explicitly exclude cotton.
    Usually, when I recommend silk I'm excluding cotton. Cotton shouldn't even enter the picture for Winter clothing. Wool makes a great baselayer also and Merino wool is very comfy next to the skin. Wool has great wicking qualities, is hell for durable even in the thinnest of garments, and retains up to 80% of its insulating properties when wet. I've just found silk to be a bit more preferable when outdoors and active (running, cycling, rowing, xc skiing, etc) because of its smoothness compared to wool. And both handle odor better than any synthetic. At a 20 degree temp, I would choose silk as my baselayer, relatively thin wool as a midlayer, and add a lightweight windbreaking/water repelling outergarment as needed. Actually, this setup is versatile across a fairly wide range of temperatures assuming you're staying at least somewhat active.

    As always, and especially with clothing, YMMV.
    Last edited by Robbie59; 11-17-2006 at 10:00 AM.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: luvmybike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    222
    Quote Originally Posted by Scot_Gore
    Others good choices to add to your shopping list would be North Face, Helly Hanson, or the REI house brand.

    For me, this poll gets answered by "whatever is on sale".

    Scot
    I think this is the best advice. There are a number of synthetic and natural materials that work pretty well. Take the time to learn the individual materials and then look at anything on sale. You will be surprised what you might find at your basic department store, in there sporting clothes section on the sale rack. Most manufacturers are just buying the material anyway and stamping there name on the shirt. If it is similar material it, in general will work the same.

    I think people would be surprised how well a good wool thin dress sweater would work as a layer... for that matter dress socks in the summer
    I really do love my bike

  23. #23
    off the back
    Reputation: rufus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    10,675
    Quote Originally Posted by rufus
    i just ordered a few Polartec Powerdry shirts from LLBean, two silkweights and a midweight, cheaper than the Patagonia stuff, and probably works the same.
    got my LLBean order the other day, and was able to get a ride in yesterday. wore one of the longsleeve silkweight shirts, the longsleeve midweight zip-T, a light fleece PI longsleeve jersey, and my PI Zephyrr shell. starting temp was around 50 degrees, and dropped to 46 by the end, and i was toasty warm the whole time. and i don't like cold at all, and was probably overdressed by some of your's standards.

    my layering till now has been a PI shortsleev base with a Helle Hanson long sleeve. but the PI shirt doesn't seem to wick that well, and i usually begin to feel cold and clammy as the ride wears on and the sweat builds up. only had a bit of dampness on my back under my Camelback, but no sense of cold or clamminess at all.

    so i have to give a big thumbsup to the Polartec Powerdry stuff.

    looking to add to this with a heavier mid-layer, and some wool midlayer stuff also. haven't found any shortsleeve Polartec stuff, so may try the EMS Techwick for a summer baselayer.
    Eff the King's Guard. Eff the city. Eff the King.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,056

    new capilene doesn't stink (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by buck-50
    I've got a capaline baselayer shirt and tights. It's really silky-comfortable and it keeps me warm, but I almost never wear it because the second I sweat in it, it begins to stink. Not just a little stink, either- there is something about capaline that turns it into a stink-amplifier.

    I have some wool that's less comfortable but I wear it more often just to avoid the stink issue.

    We're talking eye-watering powerful STANK here...

    Unless you can wash it every night or have a place to keep it hermetically sealed after you've worn it, I'd suggest staying away from capaline.

    The new Capilene has an odor fighter (they call it gladiodor or something). Supposed to be much better. Can't be any worse that is for sure! I haven't used it I stick with Smartwool and Icebreakers. Wool feels better, is durable, wicks FASTER than synthetic, warm when wet. Feels dry next to the skin even whn holding water. Looks better if you have to make a public appearance in your cycling wear.

    As a kid I hated wool, but with the finer Merino wool... well you can tell I'm a big fan.

  25. #25
    Lets Go Hokies!!!
    Reputation: HokieRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,925
    I use both capeline and underarmor for all outdoor activities in the winter - biking, camping, running, etc. I find that the capeline and the underarmor both have distinctive odors associated with them, but they can be easily removed using baking soda in the laundry or products like this
    Its not over till you're underground


    http://hokierider.blogspot.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

INTERBIKE

EUROBIKE

Hot Deals

Interbike Featured Booths

Check out the hottest road bike products from these brands!




















See All Interbike Coverage - Click Here »


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook