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  1. #176
    classiquesklassieker
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    I can sense the pace is picking up from reading your posts, and I wish all three of you all the best. What an amazing trip, and thank you very much for sharing it with the rest of us. Good luck, be safe, godspeed, and I can't imagine what amazing feeling you will have when you attend your sister's graduation after such an EPIC trip.

  2. #177
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    Patagonia continues

    Life isn't easy down here, but it is perhaps more enjoyable than any other phase of our journey. We're freezing at night, riding all day, and making time to finish in Ushuaia in two weeks. Pretty awesome to be this close, and for now we're just trying to savor the last days of our journey through this spectacular, spectacular region of the world.

    Since we've got some riding to do, I'll just share some photos to tell the story.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_0969.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_0848.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_0742.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_0701.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_0648.jpg  


  3. #178
    Descender
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    Great job guys - so close you can taste it - your sister's wedding cake that is.

  4. #179
    Formosan Cyclocross
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    I love that shot of the road.

  5. #180
    Failboat Captian
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    Stunning scenery! Soak it all in. It's almost done. And done well.

    Looking forward to more.
    "I'm tired of people not treating me like the gift that I am."
    -Paula Abdul

    Quote Originally Posted by ToF View Post
    What type of tang does it have?
    Quote Originally Posted by bigrider View Post
    The ones I made had a poo tang.

  6. #181
    Erfahrener Radfahrer
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    Press onward... your images are amazing, I can only imagine your memories. thanks for all the updates.
    Allan

    I SUPPORT DRUG FREE SPORT

  7. #182
    Sooper Dooper Moderator!
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    Repped!

  8. #183
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The End of the World

    What a ride it has been. 9 months on the dot, from August 11th to May 11th, Anchorage to Ushuaia. Now we're done. Bicycles are no longer sitting outside our tent, expectantly, waiting to be ridden to some new unexplored place over unfamiliar roads. Now they're in pieces and packed in bicycle boxes. We're going home.

    The day we finished was just like any other day really. No fireworks or fanfare as we rolled into Ushuaia. Just a lot of the same cold and gray of Patagonian winter, lots of grunting up hills, and if anything was out of the ordinary, it was the serious tinge of sadness that the road ended here. We have been looking forward to this moment for a long time, but with it comes the realization that we'll never share this same kind of thing as brothers ever again.

    Bike tours kind of suck sometimes. It's been an inside joke of ours since last fall, after an email from a follower of our journey in Canada saying, "Keep pedaling, thousands of people are envious of you guys right now." Since then, whenever we've encountered hardship of the bicycle-touring variety, we jokingly shout out, "Remember thousands of people are envious of us right now!" Because the truth is, most of that stuff doesn't make it into the pretty pictures and the rose-tinted recollections of American landscapes and families. Almost getting killed by an RV in the Yukon, losing our tent in a desert windstorm in the Baja of Mexico, getting assaulted by an unstable man in Ecuador, and doing some minor nerve damage to our feet and hands from cold camping and riding down here in Patagonia...this stuff isn't all that fun or easy. But if bicycle touring across the Americas were all easy and fun, everyone would do it right? And we know, more than anyone, how important the hard times have been to welding us together even tighter as brothers.

    We've changed drastically, but incrementally; we've lost a collective 40 pounds for example. We're pretty pro at this bicycle adventure thing, and it's funny because of how utterly incompetent we were when we started. I can't help but laugh thinking about how we rolled out of Anchorage with four panniers and a rack pack each, packed to the limit, and how we made ourselves a few dinners of nothing but noodles and canned chicken in the Alaskan wilderness. Now we've got half the gear and we eat twice as well on the road. We will never view material possessions and comforts in the same way. Daily showers? You've got to be kidding me. With not warm, but hot water? AND sufficient pressure! What a concept! Jeans and T-shirts are going to fantastic, as I have worn nothing but bike shorts, one shirt or two, and a pair of hiking pants for the past year. When you've learned to live with so little, you realize what you really need to make you happy. If I can manage to acquire a kitchen sink with drinkable water, a stove, jeans, t-shirts, and a warm place to put my sleeping bag every night, I think I'll be set for life.

    There's no question that we'll miss what we're leaving behind. What things will I miss the most? I think the biggest privilege of a bicycle expedition is the new roads and new places, every day of your life. Each day has no guarantees beyond the integrity of your maps and navigational skills. By bicycle we see so much, not only the "big things" between Alaska and Argentina that tourists drive and fly for, but the little things that only bicyclists can see. Crater Lake in Oregon. The Torres del Paine of Patagonia. The line of worker-ants more than 100 feet long along a cliff in Colombia. The countless men and women sweating at manual farm labor throughout Latin America, every day of the week. The unrehearsed new friendship of people from all walks of life. Alaskan mountaineers, Canadian-Hutterite carpenters, Colombian firemen, Argentine business magnates, you name it. The people and places you see are so ingrained in your mind because of how slowly you pass by them and how hard you work to see them. I'll never forget riding through the mist in the high mountains of Peru, and watching a traditionally dressed elderly woman herding animals while laughing and chatting away on a prepaid cell phone. Welcome to modernity.

    So much of what we experience is random and unremarkable to everyone except us. Like the time we asked for directions in a small village in southern Peru, and the woman giving us directions calmly waited with a guinea pig in her hand for the local public transit bus to arrive. Guinea pig, or cui is a delicacy in this part of the world. As the bus rolled up, she drowned it in the sink in front of us and then wrapped the body in a paper towel and began hawking it to the passengers who were headed to the larger city down the road. For reference, cui is fantastic, especially when your first acquaintance is with it nicely cooked on your plate.

    I'll never stop missing the unvarnished, unpredictable, random goodness of strangers who have saved and enriched our lives countless times since leaving Alaska. With careers and family I don't believe anything like Bound South will ever be possible again, but I have a lifetime of smaller bicycle adventures ahead of me. Hopefully I can share a lot of them with my brothers. Right now, my not-so-short-list in the USA is to do the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, Wisconsin, Maine, and countless places in Washington, Oregon, and California. Internationally, I want to go back to Colombia again. There was a, ahem, smoking hot Colombian farm girl that made a marriage offer to us after we camped at her family's farm (we worked up the courage to decline), and it would be fun to find her again to at least say hi. There is so much to be explored in Mexico, and with real Mexican food you can turn the pedals happily all day long. Three very important words: Baja fish tacos.

    What's next? I'm off to Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in October. David's going off to college. Nathan's looking for work as a music teacher, and also might do a stint in the oil fields in western North Dakota. We're all working on our family farm for the summer, and will be working at a coffee table book and a number of presentations of our journey. We've raised over $15,000 for our local Habitat for Humanity, and with a "Tour of North Dakota" in the works we hope to raise $45,000 more to build a home for a family in North Dakota with Habitat for Humanity.

    So that's all I've got for now. We're homeward bound, just in time for our sister's graduation this weekend. I can already taste my mom's cooking. Thank you to RBR for reading and being a part of this thread ever since Alaska. I'll repeat a sentiment and literary reference from earlier in this journey.

    Hemingway once recounted in a conversation with a friend, A.E. Hotchner, that “If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” If there ever was a moveable feast, it has been this bicycle expedition. The sights and smells and sensations will linger and move with me forever. I hope that you all find richness and love and a moveable feast of your own in the years to come.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1354.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1488.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1742.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1896.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1964.jpg  

    Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1981.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_2047.jpg   Bound South: Alaska to Argentina-img_1588.jpg  

  9. #184
    evs
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    THANK YOU so much...its been a joy every time I opened up your link to a new adventure and awesome pics. THANKS for letting my aspirations to travel be lived through you to see all these fantastic places that you went through. Great stuff and all the best of luck with your futures. Post up back here every once in awhile when you recharge your batteries and get back on the bike (haha after nine' months Id probably take some time off, but don't lose all that saddle time fitness) and let us know how you all are doing. THANKS again.....
    'Over the Mountains Of the Moon, Down the Valley of the Shadow, Ride, Boldly Ride,' The Shade replied, - 'If you Seek for El Dorado!'

  10. #185
    muni
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    WOW!! What a story. I too have a bittersweet feeling about the end of your journey. I'm 63 and planning my first tour next year. I wish I had done what you fellows had the courage to do when I was your age. Better late than never, though. Congratulations!

  11. #186
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    I've beyond enjoyed following along on FB, and your website. The writing and photos have been equally impressive.

    I'll admit to feeling a bit nostalgic here at journey's end. Thanks for taking us along.

    My best to you and your brothers on all of life's future roads.

  12. #187
    Unlabeled
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    Wow! I'm glad that you were foolish enough to try this and strong-willed enough to finish it. You are a true inspiration.
    Lugged Steel Treks

  13. #188
    Failboat Captian
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    I can't say anything that hasn't already been said by the throngs of followers of your adventure, other than...
    Congratulations! We'll done. And a tip of the hat to the three of you.
    "I'm tired of people not treating me like the gift that I am."
    -Paula Abdul

    Quote Originally Posted by ToF View Post
    What type of tang does it have?
    Quote Originally Posted by bigrider View Post
    The ones I made had a poo tang.

  14. #189
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    WOW Thank you for sharing your travels with us.

  15. #190
    prosciutto corsa
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    Thank you guys. It was quite a pleasure to follow your trip.

    Cheers!
    Steel: it's what's for bikefast.

  16. #191
    Bacon!
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    Again, thanks for the updates and your blog. It has been great fun watching you guys make your way south and to also see that you were doing fine, even in mud, snow, and food poisoning! You guys are an inspiration and have done something that, sadly, I'll probably never be able to accomplish.
    “To kill, you must know your enemy, and in this case my enemy is a varmint. And a varmint will never quit — ever. They’re like the Viet Cong — Varmint Cong. So you have to fall back on superior intelligence and superior firepower.”

  17. #192
    Descender
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    Best Thread Ever!

    Thanks Guys

  18. #193
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Thank you for sharing your adventures... it has been wonderful to follow along.
    Fighting C ystic F ibrosis with C arbon F iber
    Learn More about CF here: www.cff.org

  19. #194
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Like the others, I've truly enjoyed your trials and tribulations along the way.Through pictures and words the three of you have put together an impressive story. You will reflect on this adventure for the rest of your lives. Sadly all good things must end.

    Enjoy the comforts of home and family. You three have traveled far and seen much, I would propose that there are other adventures on your horizons. Good luck, God speed and take care.

  20. #195
    Failboat Captian
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    I loved following this. It would be fun if you posted up some statistics from your adventure.
    "I'm tired of people not treating me like the gift that I am."
    -Paula Abdul

    Quote Originally Posted by ToF View Post
    What type of tang does it have?
    Quote Originally Posted by bigrider View Post
    The ones I made had a poo tang.

  21. #196
    Erfahrener Radfahrer
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    Thanks for sharing your life and your trip. You're memories will last a lifetime. I think everything that I would want to say has already been said...

    ... but thanks for allowing us to follow your truly EPIC journey
    Allan

    I SUPPORT DRUG FREE SPORT

  22. #197
    acg
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    Thanks for the wonderful pics and stories of your travel. I am a father to three young boys (8, 6 and 4). I hope they grow up in the same spirit of sharing and bonding which you shown with your brothers in your adventure.
    Last edited by acg; 05-17-2012 at 01:31 PM.
    Merlin Extralight Campy
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  23. #198
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    I believe everyone on this forum will agree with me:

    We collectively lived your journey through your beautiful pictures. It made my day every time I opened my email to see an update to this thread, and the pictures you posted never disappointed.

    I do think that the "not so awesome experiences" that you and your brothers went through is what will truly remind you of what a great journey you all had.

    Good job boys!!!!!!

    AND keep us updated with your new and exciting news.

  24. #199
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    WOW...Truly epic !

  25. #200
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    Congratulations to the three of you. You are an inspiration to all of us. Your photography is outstanding. Thanks
    never,never,never give up

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