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  1. #1
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    Handlebar Baskets for errand running?

    Does anyone use one they can recommend?

    I'm wondering if this one will interfere with the shifters/levers on my mtb:
    http://www.bikepartsusa.com/product_...ml?p=01-166560

  2. #2
    Bacon!
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    Can you put a rear rack on your bike? Might be easier and less weight on the front. You could bungi a basket onto it or whatever.
    “To kill, you must know your enemy, and in this case my enemy is a varmint. And a varmint will never quit — ever. They’re like the Viet Cong — Varmint Cong. So you have to fall back on superior intelligence and superior firepower.”

  3. #3
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    id get a rack and then bungee a milk crate to the back

  4. #4
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    Rivendell is big on baskets. See

    http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/baggage_racks/20098.html

    as an example.

    I'd e-mail them with your question. If anyone can provide you with a good answer, it'll be the elves at Rivendell.

    Good luck!

    - FBB
    "Cycloculture" - A Journal for Real-World Bicyclists
    http://cycloculture.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
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    Alternatively, you could post your question on:

    http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/KOG

    Lots of basket fans there as well.

    Me? I'm looking for something unique made out of wicker, something I'm NOT going to get from a bike store. I will strap it to the handlebars and support it from below with a front rack I just got.

    - FBB
    "Cycloculture" - A Journal for Real-World Bicyclists
    http://cycloculture.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
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    Baskets rule

    After much soul searching and hand wringing, I went with a front basket, and I have to say my life has changed for the better.

    I got the small size front basket (Wald) tha attaches to the front skewer/axle. Big enough to carry a small briefcase and Krypto NY Lock (for the trip to work...keeps the sweat effect low by getting the load off one's back) or a decent helping of takeout Chinese (last night) or four bottles of Cahors, some assorted cheese, crackers AND the ubiquitous NY Lock (tonight). It's great. It makes carting stuff around easy. I supplement it with a fairly generous saddlebag but the truth is that I have yet to max out both. It's nice to get stuff off your back (my ancient Scumbags messenger bag is getting scant use these days).

    The downside is that depending on how it is mounted to your bike, your load bearing capacity may be limited. I think I could easily get two six packs in mine. When you go over bumpy surfaces, things will bounce around a bit. But that's where bungee cords come in. In a perfect world, I would get one of the ANT bikes with a custom made front basket, but $20 or so for the Wald does just fine.

    I told my wife last week (on another Cahors run) that the basket has changed the way I view my utilitarian Bianchi Stelvio fixie...unless you are Joe Racer (and that's what I was in a prior life) it's a really good thing.

    M_B

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by atarinaper
    id get a rack and then bungee a milk crate to the back
    Hose clamps work better for this, more solid and stable.

  8. #8
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    My wife has one of those on her cruizer bike. It's great for one bag of groceries. It fits on paper bag full. It's nice because she can take it off and use it while in the store and she knows everything will fit in on the way home.

    It might mess with the shifting, but how much shifting will you need to get to and from the store?

  9. #9
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    Baskets

    We have baskets on our beach cruisers that hang off the handlebar, and are detachable. They are okay, but really make steering difficult if they are loaded up with say a few bags of groceries that include liquids.

    I saw just about every delivery place in NYC using the large, permanently fixed baskets (the ones that connect down to the axle). They are probably more stable.

    But, if you going to go grocery runs with more than 10 or 20 lbs, from my limited experience I would recommend the back rack setup.

  10. #10
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    Guess my wife doesn't carry many liquids. Didn't think of that. We have milk delivered to the house, so we don't buy many liquids. She doesn't use the basket for major shopping, just picking up some salad and a few other items. We are also only about 1/2 mile from the store so it isn't that big of a haul.

  11. #11
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    This one trip...

    Quote Originally Posted by KJohnson
    Guess my wife doesn't carry many liquids. Didn't think of that. We have milk delivered to the house, so we don't buy many liquids. She doesn't use the basket for major shopping, just picking up some salad and a few other items. We are also only about 1/2 mile from the store so it isn't that big of a haul.
    This one trip I decided to run over to get groceries for breakfast: eggs, milk, OJ, fruit, etc. The bike was a handful on the short trip back home. I was originally going to get the rear baskets that are collapsible for carrying groceries, beach stuff, etc., but took the easy route by getting only the handlebar basket. Just a heads-up for others.

    http://www.lexcobike.com/adbasket.htm

    We have the 133GB on our bikes. Simplest one out there.

  12. #12
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    Wicker

    Quote Originally Posted by fbagatelleblack
    Me? I'm looking for something unique made out of wicker, something I'm NOT going to get from a bike store. I will strap it to the handlebars and support it from below with a front rack I just got.- FBB
    These are classics, from the oldest bike shop on Nantucket Island.

    http://www.youngsbicycleshop.com/shop/wicker.html

  13. #13
    rigger
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    The way forward

    Dont bodge, there are plenty of bespoke systems to be had. Baskets on the bars look v miss J Brodie on your vintage Pashley but they add a lot of leverage to whats going on up there on an MTB/hybrid. There are cavernous panniers on the market to fit on a rear rack or for your shopping i think www.bikehod.com is worth a look. You can unclip it and use it as an in store trolley priceless if your supermarket has a self swipe barcode sysyem.
    Neil
    my hovercraft is full of eels

  14. #14
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    No experience with it, but I think this one looks kind of interesting:

    http://detours.us/catalog/product_in...f61250db6f1f7e

  15. #15
    rigger
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    How Big?

    I refer my right honourable friend to the answer i gave earlier. All the weight you could stuff in here would be better in a rear rack where its not adding unwanted momentum to your steering. Remember this is like your annual holiday packing; take a big suitcase and you'll fill it. Is this bag soundproof to quell the annoying yapping of the rat size pooches to which it refers?
    Neil
    my hovercraft is full of eels

  16. #16
    "It's alive!"
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooliferkins
    I refer my right honourable friend to the answer i gave earlier. All the weight you could stuff in here would be better in a rear rack where its not adding unwanted momentum to your steering.
    You are right, of course, but an alternative route would be to get this bike:

    http://www.kogswell.com/PR.html

    It is specifically designed for front loading.

    I know, I know... The OP is talking about putting bags on a bike NOT designed for front loading. But that Kogswell Porteur is JUST SO COOL (and Matthew promises me he is going to get them in a 64cm frame one of these days. Woohoo!)

    - FBB
    "Cycloculture" - A Journal for Real-World Bicyclists
    http://cycloculture.blogspot.com/

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooliferkins
    I refer my right honourable friend to the answer i gave earlier. All the weight you could stuff in here would be better in a rear rack where its not adding unwanted momentum to your steering. Remember this is like your annual holiday packing; take a big suitcase and you'll fill it. Is this bag soundproof to quell the annoying yapping of the rat size pooches to which it refers?
    To start, I am not a big fan of rat sized pooches. (Not that there's anything wrong with that!)

    I do disagree with the idea that it is always better to have the weight of your cargo in the rear. I find that cargo in front does not cause problems with steering as long as the weight is balanced equally on the left and right. Typically more of the rider's weight is already on the rear wheel than on the front wheel, and adding more weight to the back can make steering feel loosey-goosey in my experience (in some circumstances). Neither front nor back is always the right answer, but neither front nor back is always the wrong answer either.

  18. #18
    rigger
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    The Kogswell looks good and i seem to remember seeing some good reviews of their cargo carrying bikes a few years back. No point getting in a bun fight about front v back. Options seem to be the Pashley type basket the bags above, or a trailer of some description. A friend uses a bob yak for shopping/ cycle camping they're v good with a low C of G. They have the added bonus of confusing the s##t out of motorists who then tend to pass high, wide and hansome. i have some Carradyce shopping panniers which i have used for shopping/touring/camping with great success.
    Neil
    my hovercraft is full of eels

  19. #19
    "It's alive!"
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooliferkins
    The Kogswell looks good and i seem to remember seeing some good reviews of their cargo carrying bikes a few years back.
    Kogswell has always been known for their practical bikes. The Porteur is a new adenture for them. It is designed around the geometry of the classic french porteur delivery bicycles. It has modern touches, like tig-welding and cantilever brakes, but the frame angles and the 650B wheels remain unchanged.

    Quote Originally Posted by wooliferkins
    A friend uses a bob yak for shopping/ cycle camping they're v good with a low C of G. They have the added bonus of confusing the s##t out of motorists who then tend to pass high, wide and hansome.
    I've used a BOB Coz for several years, sometimes with very heavy loads. The Coz is the (now discontinued) cheaper model which is basically a big Rubbermaid storage container mounted to a frame with one wheel on the back. I really like it! It has a much smaller impact on handling than heavily-loaded panniers. However, it is less manuverable than a bike with just panniers, especially for walking your bike and hauling it up stairs, etc.

    - FBB
    "Cycloculture" - A Journal for Real-World Bicyclists
    http://cycloculture.blogspot.com/

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