Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310

    Post Typhoon Morikot Ride Report

    I went out over the past two weekend to see how my area fared after the catastrophe that occurred three weeks ago. We were lucky that my area fared well as we were hit by the eye of the storm and missed out on the rain. The rain hit the south pretty hard.

    On my ride I ran into a few damaged bridges and there were a few more that were closed to traffic because they had not been inspected for damage. I still made my way over those bridges to keep my ride from being over a century. A little bike wasn't going to bring any bridge down... I was sure to ride really fast. Gorgeous weather.

    In the pictures you can see the missing piece of bridge I had to traverse. I shouldered the bike, grabbed the light pole and jumped to the other side a little danger (Don't tell my wife!).

    You can still see how full the river had gotten. I kept running into yellow spirit money all over the road. It finally dawned on me that that was brought out to the bridge by family members of victims who were swept off the road and have not been recovered. The southern mountain areas are still in a state of disaster.

    I stopped by the remains of a Shinto shrine built in 1939. Like all the old Shinto shrines, the Nationalist government just turned them into eyesores, put some old tanks and guns around the grounds and called in a "Martyr's Park". The Torii and lanterns still remain, though the Showa emperor's name has been scratched off.

    The last pictures have an incense factory and a guy with a trike hauling a mini fridge in the back. A dude's gotta have a place for the beer.

    The beginning of my ride started out by getting run into a car by a bus. When I yelled at the driver he flipped me the bird. 5 miles from home my wheel slipped into a drainage grate and I bent my rim. Almost a nice day for a ride.

  2. #2
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    Whoops! Here's the pics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Typhoon Morikot Ride Report-nantou-1.jpg   Post Typhoon Morikot Ride Report-nantou-2.jpg   Post Typhoon Morikot Ride Report-nantou-3.jpg  

  3. #3
    MB1
    MB1 is offline
    Enjoying Post-Employment
    Reputation: MB1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    21,740
    That is just so different from what we see around here........
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  4. #4
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    Taiwan is great for cycling.

  5. #5
    kytyree
    Guest
    Certainly one of my goals to get out and ride more of the world than just the US and a base in Iraq before they put me in the ground.

  6. #6
    Sooper Dooper Moderator!
    Reputation: il sogno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    18,920
    I didn't know there were Shinto shrines in Taiwan. I thought Shinto was a Japanese thing.

  7. #7
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    History Lesson:

    Taiwan was ceded to Japan in 1895 and Japan turned Taiwan into a model colony by building up the infrastructure and transforming the islands from a patchwork of semi-autonomous towns into a fully connected society.

    In the years leading up to WWII, Japan hoped to fully integrate Taiwanese into their new concept of Empire and several Shinto shrines were built to encourage Taiwanese to behave like Japanese on the home islands. Many Taiwanese acculturated and became Japanese. They spoke Japanese, dressed Japanese, listened to Japanese music and took on Japanese values. My wife's grandparents still identify themselves as Japanese.

    In 1945, at the close of WWII, Taiwan was occupied by the Chinese Nationalist government of behalf of the Allies. Due to the new political situation of the looming cold war, the Nationalist government was given defacto control of Taiwan, where they murdered 30,000 citizens and instituted a similar colonial policy as the Japanese. Many Japanese colonial institutions were simply left in place and used to promote Nationalist ideology rather than the Japanese.

    With American assistance, Taiwanese were effectively kept under martial law for nearly 45 years. During that period any trace of Japanese influence was treated as betrayal, which gave the Chinese Nationalists their pretext to maintain a society which limited the rights of the native Taiwanese who make up 88% of the population. This is also where the idea to annex Taiwan to China comes from.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,280
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    I shouldered the bike, grabbed the light pole and jumped to the other side a little danger ....
    The beginning of my ride started out by getting run into a car by a bus....
    5 miles from home my wheel slipped into a drainage grate and I bent my rim....
    It sounds like you lack excitement in your rides. Try igniting your hair before you take off- maybe that would liven things up a bit.

  9. #9
    Sooper Dooper Moderator!
    Reputation: il sogno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    18,920
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    History Lesson:
    .....
    Ya learn something new every day!

  10. #10
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    I get all kinds of crap from my riding buddies who all have classic road bikes for my road/CX set up. I gotta say... the extra 1lb of disc brake was the difference between riding 5 miles with a severely bent rim... and walking those 5 miles with a bike on my shoulder.

  11. #11
    Roadie with unshaven legs
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,044
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    In 1945, at the close of WWII, Taiwan was occupied by the Chinese Nationalist government of behalf of the Allies.
    My family was part of that migration, my father being part of the old guard in China. He was being hunted by the Japanese at one point then was hunted by the Communists later. We moved to Hong Kong in the late '50s then came to the US in 1966.

  12. #12
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    He was being hunted by the Japanese in China or Taiwan? If he was in Taiwan that would be very odd after 1945 as the Japanese were pretty much idle and wouldn't have hunted anyone. The Communists would have been in China as well, so he wouldn't have been in Taiwan at all. I'm curious about this family history.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: threebikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    326
    Thanks for the pictures.
    Glad you are ok. Those storms can be deadly.
    The most expensive thing you can buy for your road bike is a scale.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tarwheel2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,847
    Thanks for the pics. Cool bike too. We've had some serious flooding in NC over the years from hurricanes, such as Floyd, which dropped nearly 40" of rain over several days. Not as serious as the recent flooding in Taiwan, but devastating nonetheless. It is pretty flat in Eastern NC where Floyd hit, and there were areas flooded that were miles away from known "floodplains." Miles on interstate highways were under water and bridges washed out. I helped with the cleanup after the storm, and it was amazing how high the water got in areas -- up to the roofs of houses that were miles away from the nearest stream. Definitely an eye opener.

  15. #15
    Bacon!
    Reputation: Ridgetop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    9,192
    Sad to see the damage but a good ride report.

  16. #16
    Roadie with unshaven legs
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,044
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    He was being hunted by the Japanese in China or Taiwan? If he was in Taiwan that would be very odd after 1945 as the Japanese were pretty much idle and wouldn't have hunted anyone. The Communists would have been in China as well, so he wouldn't have been in Taiwan at all. I'm curious about this family history.
    In China. We moved to Taiwan to escape this.

  17. #17
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    Oh... after 45 to escape the Communists. Pre 45 Taiwan was Japanese.

  18. #18
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    I really didn't even get near the places that were severely hit. It would have been disrespectful of me to tour around while there are still people buried. Maybe is a couple months I'll get out there and see how everyone is doing.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    693
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    History Lesson:

    Taiwan was ceded to Japan in 1895 and Japan turned Taiwan into a model colony by building up the infrastructure and transforming the islands from a patchwork of semi-autonomous towns into a fully connected society.

    In the years leading up to WWII, Japan hoped to fully integrate Taiwanese into their new concept of Empire and several Shinto shrines were built to encourage Taiwanese to behave like Japanese on the home islands. Many Taiwanese acculturated and became Japanese. They spoke Japanese, dressed Japanese, listened to Japanese music and took on Japanese values. My wife's grandparents still identify themselves as Japanese.

    In 1945, at the close of WWII, Taiwan was occupied by the Chinese Nationalist government of behalf of the Allies. Due to the new political situation of the looming cold war, the Nationalist government was given defacto control of Taiwan, where they murdered 30,000 citizens and instituted a similar colonial policy as the Japanese. Many Japanese colonial institutions were simply left in place and used to promote Nationalist ideology rather than the Japanese.

    With American assistance, Taiwanese were effectively kept under martial law for nearly 45 years. During that period any trace of Japanese influence was treated as betrayal, which gave the Chinese Nationalists their pretext to maintain a society which limited the rights of the native Taiwanese who make up 88% of the population. This is also where the idea to annex Taiwan to China comes from.
    Thank you for writing this, I realized that I know very little about the history of Taiwan and particularly its historical ties with Japan. I find it particularly interesting that your wife's grandparents identify themselves as Japanese.

    Could you recommend a good book on the modern history of Taiwan (in English)?

    Thanks.

  20. #20
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    Sure!

    Something not too heavy... a good intro might be:

    http://www.amazon.com/Taiwan-Politic.../dp/0801488052

    Rubinstein, Murray A, ed. 1999. Taiwan: A New History. New York, M.E. Sharpe, Inc. ISBN 1-56324-816-6

    For the best account of the immediate post WWII era you MUST read
    Formosa Betrayed by George Kerr. You can download the pdf. online for free.
    http://homepage.usask.ca/~llr130/tai.../kerr/kerr.pdf

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    693
    Quote Originally Posted by Dajianshan
    Sure!
    Wow, thanks. I've downloaded the PDF and will look into the book you mentioned.

    Would love to visit some day, my father has visited a number of times for business, but I've never had the chance to.

  22. #22
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,310
    No problem. If anyone wants to come out I'd be happy to set up a ride.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook