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  1. #1
    A Canadian in Sweden
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    Saddlebag, rack plus trunk bag, or fanny pack on a long ride?

    Ok, so this is the story. In June, I'll be riding my first ever Vätternrundan (300 km) (http://www.cyklavaettern.com/default.aspx?lang=1) and I would like to bring some extra gear along that will require something larger than my small 2 litre saddlebag. Extra gear such as a small rain jacket, possibly booties, extra socks, repair accessories, etc. I've never done such a long ride all at once and I'll heard stories regarding the weather that have made me consider getting something larger.

    I recently posted a thread about possibly purchasing a larger saddlebag and received some good options, but I'm still confused. What I would like to know is what other members are doing / would do on such a long ride?

    Would you suggest:
    a) use a larger saddlebag such as a Carradice (see tarwheel)?
    b) use a rack and trunk bag like the one from Arkel (see link)?
    c) use a waist pack like the one from Arc'teryx Q10 (which I already have and MB and MissM use)?

    Keep in mind that I have a road bicycle without any rack braze-ons.

    Slightly larger saddlebags

    Pannier rack for road bike (no mounts)?

    rear rack issues

    http://www.arkel-od.com/panniers/tai...?fl=1&site=cdn

    http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?Q10

    Thanks for your help.
    Wayne
    Albert (5 years old) to Uncle Peter (family friend): "Why don't we play another card game, something you can win at."

  2. #2
    banned from the museum
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    Between your existing saddlebag and a handlebar bag I think you would be good. I love my BOB, but I wouldn't want to pull it just to carry a few odds-and-ends.

  3. #3
    Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
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    How about a camelbak if it didn't cause any back pain?
    Just fast enough to know I am slow.

  4. #4
    Yo no fui.
    Reputation: Pablo's Avatar
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    You could buy a clip on seat post rack and bungee cord a small backpack/lumbar pack onto it. I do this on my commute now.
    "It is better to conquer yourself, than to win a thousand battles." -Dhammapada

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  5. #5
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    I rode a 600 mile round trip with a medium sized handlebar bag that didn't require a rack, a clip-on trunk rack with a large bag, and a triangular shaped frame bag. I rode in July so I didn't have any issues with cold weather gear. I don't own any rain gear, and never had. I just get wet. That's not a problem for me. I wasn't camping, but stayed in fleabag motels.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  6. #6
    Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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    If your saddle has bag loops, I would go with a Carradice. You can roll up the jacket and tie it to the loops on the outside of the bag, leaving the bag itself free to carry more stuff (adding food to the list of items you already mentioned).

    Here's a pic of my Barley. I think it's the smallest of the Carradice saddlebags and it holds quite a bit:

    "He groaned when we hung the rope over the tree but was relieved to see the white pinata."
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  7. #7
    A Canadian in Sweden
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRoebuck
    If your saddle has bag loops, I would go with a Carradice. You can roll up the jacket and tie it to the loops on the outside of the bag, leaving the bag itself free to carry more stuff (adding food to the list of items you already mentioned).

    Here's a pic of my Barley. I think it's the smallest of the Carradice saddlebags and it holds quite a bit:

    Thanks DR. Do you use a rack to support the Barley?
    Albert (5 years old) to Uncle Peter (family friend): "Why don't we play another card game, something you can win at."

  8. #8
    Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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    Quote Originally Posted by wayneanneli
    Thanks DR. Do you use a rack to support the Barley?
    Nah. You can get a support that attaches to your seatpost, but I've never done it. The back of my legs will rub against the bag but it doesn't bother me in the least. (Then again, this is for my commuter so my rides are pretty short. I've never taken it more than 50 miles or so.)
    "He groaned when we hung the rope over the tree but was relieved to see the white pinata."
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  9. #9
    A Canadian in Sweden
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    Thanks for your responses everyone.
    Idaho: the BOB would just be overkill for this trip. I've never considered a handlebar bag, but it sounds interesting.
    Jupiter: I really want to avoid carrying anything on my back.
    Pablo: I'm not a huge fan of clip-on seatpost racks.
    Versatile: This is middle-Sweden, so anything can happen, even snow, as remote as the chance might be. Seems like handlebar bags are getting some votes.
    Albert (5 years old) to Uncle Peter (family friend): "Why don't we play another card game, something you can win at."

  10. #10
    Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
    Reputation: DrRoebuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wayneanneli
    Thanks for your responses everyone.
    Idaho: the BOB would just be overkill for this trip. I've never considered a handlebar bag, but it sounds interesting.
    Jupiter: I really want to avoid carrying anything on my back.
    Pablo: I'm not a huge fan of clip-on seatpost racks.
    Versatile: This is middle-Sweden, so anything can happen, even snow, as remote as the chance might be. Seems like handlebar bags are getting some votes.
    Having ridden with both a handlebar bag and a saddlebag, I would go saddlebag first, then a handlebar bag if you need additional storage capacity. At slow speeds, the handelbar bag can make steering a little sketchy.

    On the plus side of handlebar bags, a lot of them come with a clear pouch on the top, which is great for maps, cue sheets, etc.

    "He groaned when we hung the rope over the tree but was relieved to see the white pinata."
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  11. #11
    hello
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    I also use the Barley. I don't have saddle loops so I have to rely on the Bagman Support to keep it high (away from the rear wheel) and from swaying.

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  12. #12
    A Canadian in Sweden
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    I also use the Barley. I don't have saddle loops so I have to rely on the Bagman Support to keep it high (away from the rear wheel) and from swaying.

    Nice photo of the Bagman support. I have the saddle loops on my Brooks, but the Bagman might be a nice addition. I've read good things about the use of a rack to avoid swaying. What do you and DR usually pack in a Barley? In another thread, tarwheel wrote a pretty extensive list of stuff.
    Albert (5 years old) to Uncle Peter (family friend): "Why don't we play another card game, something you can win at."

  13. #13
    your text here
    Reputation: weltyed's Avatar
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    you can get a rack to work even if there aren't braze-ons, right? I have rigged one up to use the seatpost binder and the aftermarket seatstay clamps.

    I don't really like QR racks, but it might work for your intention.
    I don't normally "do people." - Dr. Roebuck

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Carradice have an SQR seatpost attachment that I have used commuting and touring for thousands of miles - it has woked great for me - the ability to take it off in under 2 second is great

    however - for what you are talking about - you should mebbe think about a frame pack too -I have both a Mountain Equipment Co-op and a Jannd frame pack which sound like they could fit the extra kit you are talking about with no problem

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    bags

    The Barley would be perfect for what you're considering. I found the Bagman rack (or similar ones) was necessary with my frame to keep the bag from swaying and hitting my legs. What is nice about the Carradice and other large seatbags is that they center the weight so it doesn't affect handling like a handlebar or rack bag does.

    Velo-orange.com and Acornbags.com also sell very nice large saddlebags.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Saddlebag, rack plus trunk bag, or fanny pack on a long ride?-freddy-merckx-2.jpg  
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  16. #16
    A Canadian in Sweden
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    Thanks again for your responses. I'm kind of leaning towards a Barley. I really like the new bags from Rivendell, but are they ever expensive. 165US is just too rich for my blood.
    I'll have a look at the SQR attachment too.
    Albert (5 years old) to Uncle Peter (family friend): "Why don't we play another card game, something you can win at."

  17. #17
    hello
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    Quote Originally Posted by wayneanneli
    What do you and DR usually pack in a Barley? In another thread, tarwheel wrote a pretty extensive list of stuff.
    Lots of stuff for such a smallish bag...

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  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    For that kind of distance my first thought would be one of those giant, behind the seat bags you mentioned. It's certainly easy on, easy off.

    I'm not a huge fan of the idea of a seatpost rack because I have a carbon fiber seatpost, plus they might be a little unstable. I'd hate to put a handlebar bag on and change the handling of the bike. And as you mentioned, far worse than either of those things would be having to carry something on your back the entire trip.

    If I was doing a *lot* of really long rides like that, in varying weather, or if I also wanted to be able to carry enough stuff for commuting to work I would seriously consider just putting a rack on the bike anyways. I recently started a thread about the different stuff that's available to add a rack to a full carbon bike without rack mounts here:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=510439

    I think a rack that attaches at the seat post and the rear wheel skewer (both places the bike is designed to carry weight - the weight of the rider) would be ideal, and let you carry pretty much anything you could carry in a full backpack on the bike without any sort of worry about the rack "damaging" or being "insecure" on the bike.

  19. #19
    Eat fried chicken.
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    Last year I completed 200k, 300k and 600k brevets with a Carradice Barley Bag, they're excellent. I ride a fairly large bike (63cm) and so didn't need the support. I was sorta worried about the bag rubbing the back of my thighs but it wasn't a problem. I tended to overstuff it but I wouldn't blame that so much on the space available in the bag as much as my inexperience with randonneuring.

    I actually just took the plunge today and ordered a Berthoud handlebar bag and decaleur. My bike isn't really designed for front loads but I think it's going to be okay. I wanted a handlebar bag like this so that I'd have a better place to put my cue sheet and easier and quicker access to things like food and vest.

    But yeah, the Barley bag is excellent and have gotten tons of use out of mine over the winter and on longer rides.

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