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  1. #1
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    Soma Smoothie ES

    I am looking to purchase a second bike for commuting and short credit card touring. I am trying to choose between the Smoothie and the Double Cross CX bike.

    The only worries I have about the Smoothie is that I want to run Planet Bike Cascadia Road fenders and possibly 28mm tires but I have read on a few posts the 28mm tires on the front are to tight.

    The postings where older so I was wondering if there are any newer Soma Smoothie ES owners with this set up give me some feed back.

  2. #2
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky13 View Post
    I am looking to purchase a second bike for commuting and short credit card touring. I am trying to choose between the Smoothie and the Double Cross CX bike.

    The only worries I have about the Smoothie is that I want to run Planet Bike Cascadia Road fenders and possibly 28mm tires but I have read on a few posts the 28mm tires on the front are to tight.

    The postings where older so I was wondering if there are any newer Soma Smoothie ES owners with this set up give me some feed back.
    I am looking for one too. I am trying to unload a full carbon frame and fork to make the switch. Carbon is just not for me.

  3. #3
    LC
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    I don't have a Smoothie ES but I do have a similar Stanyon and Double Cross. The ES does not come with a fork you buy it separate. Soma and IRD makes two 57mm reach forks; unicrown and lugged. The lugged gives you enough room for 28mm + fenders, the unicrown fork is tighter.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by LC View Post
    I don't have a Smoothie ES but I do have a similar Stanyon and Double Cross. The ES does not come with a fork you buy it separate. Soma and IRD makes two 57mm reach forks; unicrown and lugged. The lugged gives you enough room for 28mm + fenders, the unicrown fork is tighter.
    Carbon?

  5. #5
    LC
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    I only know about the steel forks.

  6. #6
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    I have a Soma ES. I could easily run 32 mm tires on it, and fenders would be no problem either. I have 25mm tires, and there is plenty of room. I'm using the Soma steel fork on the bike.

    Caution, NNC content within. New ride

  7. #7
    Big is relative
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    I commuted on an ES for two years. I had the steel fork with SKS fenders. A 28mm tire would clear the front fender but if it got anything on it, it scraped. I ran a 25 in the front and a 28 in the rear. I could have run a 32 on the back with a fender, lots of room. I used Specialized Armadillos, a 28mm Conti Gatorskin might be ok in the front. In any case, I never had a problem with a 25 in the front and I had rough roads, gravel paths, and the occassional curb hop. Tektro long reach brakes fit the ES, change the stock pads.

    Full disclosure, my ES broke at the rear dropout. Soma was initially slow on the warranty but after a few additional issues, they made it right. In their defense, they didn't have much experience in warranty issues, they seem to sell a good product. While I was waiting on a replacement frame, I bought a Gunnar Crosshairs. The warranty Soma is still in the factory box. I'm going to make it a sport utility bike next year.
    Retired sailor

  8. #8
    No Crybabies
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    Quote Originally Posted by My Own Private Idaho View Post
    I have a Soma ES. I could easily run 32 mm tires on it, and fenders would be no problem either. I have 25mm tires, and there is plenty of room. I'm using the Soma steel fork on the bike.

    Caution, NNC content within. New ride
    I have an ES with carbon fork from Soma and fenders plus 28 mm tires work fine.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  9. #9
    Blah, Blah, Blah
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    I'd ask what type of commuting are you doing or type of credit card touring? The ES should be good as long as you stick to paved roads, nice dirt roads, rail trails, etc. With the double cross you can fit good fat 38c tiers and some fenders. Throw on some cx-9 "cross" v-brakes and you've have a pretty sweet rig with fat tires and super stopping power.
    I am biased I admit. I have a 5 year old Double Cross that I absolutely love to go on mixed terrain rides with. I've have a loop that consists of pavement, dirt road and single track. I ride my double cross with 700x35c maxxis cross tires or 700x30c (really more like 34-35) michelin jet or mud tires.
    it would make an excellent credit card tourer, but I went with a Salsa Fargo for a touring bike. I want to be able to carry some gear and hit some remote places with that bike.
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  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=onrhodes;3465182]I'd ask what type of commuting are you doing or type of credit card touring? The ES should be good as long as you stick to paved roads, nice dirt roads, rail trails, etc. With the double cross you can fit good fat 38c tiers and some fenders. Throw on some cx-9 "cross" v-brakes and you've have a pretty sweet rig with fat tires and super stopping power.
    I am biased I admit. I have a 5 year old Double Cross that I absolutely love to go on mixed terrain rides with. I've have a loop that consists of pavement, dirt road and single track. I ride my double cross with 700x35c maxxis cross tires or 700x30c (really more like 34-35) michelin jet or mud tires.
    it would make an excellent credit card tourer, but I went with a Salsa Fargo for a touring bike. I want to be able to carry some gear and hit some remote places with that bike.[/QUOTE

    I try to stay off gravel roads and I want to try credit card touring probably no longer then 5-7 days couple times a year if that.
    I commute 32 miles round trip through big city and want to try riding on bad weather days.

    Still undecided on steel and carbon fork. What are the pro/con of each. I know with steel you have eyelets for racks but other then that I don't know anything else.
    Last edited by lucky13; 07-22-2011 at 11:59 AM.

  11. #11
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    "Still undecided on steel and carbon fork. What are the pro/con of each. I know with steel you have eyelets for racks but other then that I don't know anything else."

    The steel forks have greater clearance for larger tires, or a smaller tire and fenders.

    IMO, there's no point putting a carbon fork on a steel framed bike, especially one designed to take fenders and a rack. You maybe gain a touch more comfortable ride with carbon (big maybe as much of the ride comfort is tire size and air pressure), and it's slightly lighter, but gain the weight back with larger tires, a rack and fenders and defeat the functionality of the bike

    I also personally like the look of a fork painted to match the frame, which is not possible with an IRD carbon fork.

  12. #12
    LC
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    Don't think of old experience or stories of the old cheap bike with the steel fork so harsh it could be made out of a boat anchor. A good modern steel fork rides very smooth because it is designed to flex. Instead of avoiding pot holes on a carbon fork, you steer into them just to feel how nice it rides

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