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  1. #1
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    Question 1 x 11 Ultegra road bike

    Iím in the process of building up a titanium road bike and was think of doing a 1x11 set up. I didnít see a Shimano option for this in Ultegra. So I was looking to see what was needed to pull this off.

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    A 1x ring, and appropriate chainring bolts/washers to get the chainline right.

    You'll also probably need a wolf-link to get a rangy enough cassette to make it practical for hills...just know that in doing this you sacrifice cassette-spacing in order to lose that FD. Be prepared to never have quite the right gearing for the cadence you want.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
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    Thanks. This is a build for a fairly flat riding area. So I think I can make the cassette work. I only use 3-5 rear gears currently on current bike. This is more just a fun idea.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdsmoke View Post
    Thanks. This is a build for a fairly flat riding area. So I think I can make the cassette work. I only use 3-5 rear gears currently on current bike. This is more just a fun idea.
    I prefer tight cassette spacing, one tooth jumps 11-23, for flat riding. Helps with rollers and wind.

    And as comment I really donít get the 1X idea for road riding. You need a place to put your hands and need 2 brake levers anyway, so whatís the point ?. Itís not like front shifting suddenly got worse with 10 and 11 speed systems, if anything the Di2 Synchro Shifting just made it a bit slicker.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

    And as comment I really donít get the 1X idea for road riding. You need a place to put your hands and need 2 brake levers anyway, so whatís the point ?. Itís not like front shifting suddenly got worse with 10 and 11 speed systems, if anything the Di2 Synchro Shifting just made it a bit slicker.
    +1

    And itís not just Di2: all of Shimanoís 11s groupsets shift amazingly well up front - it takes so much less effort to go from small to big (compared to older FDs), and you have to do something really crazy to drop the chain.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    +1

    And itís not just Di2: all of Shimanoís 11s groupsets shift amazingly well up front - it takes so much less effort to go from small to big (compared to older FDs), and you have to do something really crazy to drop the chain.
    So true. I installed a 5800 group a year and change ago, the front shift is remarkable. As good as the rear.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    +1

    And itís not just Di2: all of Shimanoís 11s groupsets shift amazingly well up front - it takes so much less effort to go from small to big (compared to older FDs), and you have to do something really crazy to drop the chain.
    This.

    And I have to wonder why you need to go 1x up front. If you currently only use 3-5 rear gears, you probably seldom, if ever, shift up front.

    This project doesn't sound like it serves any real purpose, unless you are just looking for something to tinker with in order to pass the winter months away.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  8. #8
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    I just ordered a 44t Wolf Tooth for my 6800 road bike. It's also fairly flat around here, so I don't really need 22 different ratios. Plus, I find the need to adjust the front derailleur trim more frequently on 11-speed vs. 9 or 10 speed to be a bit annoying. I don't think that the chainring will look all that great on a 6800 crank, but it was on sale, and I've wanted to try it for a while. The 44t may be bit too low for some situations, but it will allow for a good cruising speed with a little extra on top. I think the best way to do it, cosmetically, is to get a Sram Force 1x crank or even just swap to that entire drivetrain.

    I recently built up another bike with a 5800 1x11 (11-28 with a 38t on an XT MTB crankset), and aside from needing more top end, it was really nice to ride. Dead quiet and no chain rub. When it comes to the front shifter, I just left it on with no shift cable/housing. No issues there. I've been using 1x on my MTBs for a while now, and have been a big fan. I assume it'll be the same for the road side.

  9. #9
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    I like the idea and the simplicity however it's just not practical for most of us unless you want a rear cassette the size of a dinner plate..

  10. #10
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    Yep, like anything on a bike, what works best depends on where you live and how you ride. I'm not sure that a 1x would have been ideal when I could ride out the front door and into the front range of the Rockies, but where I live now is pretty flat. On road bike rides that mostly consist of setting the cruise control at 20 or 21 mph with a few short and not steep hills thrown in, a 1x is perfect.

    I agree that the 28t chainrings and massive ratio gap 50t cassettes that the MTB industry push on everybody are pretty unnecessary and sort of stupid for the majority of MTBers in this country, but hey, it's new and shiny.

  11. #11
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    I just finished this project - and LOVE the result...

    - SRAM Force 1x crank with a 52t narrow-wide chainring
    - SRAM Force levers - right is an 11-speed and brake; left is just the brake
    - SRAM Rival rear derailleur (nice unit, has a clutch)
    - Shimano Ultegra cassette - 11-28

    Just dropping the inner ring off a 2x crank could work... maybe. The upside of the SRAM setup is that the chainring is centered and the narrow-wide teeth work to keep the chain seated.

    Backpedaling can a problem with 1x__ setups without some type of guide when the chainring isn't centered. The SRAM setup works great - backpedaling on the 11 and 28 won't drop the chain.

    The 52:28 is plenty of gear for sub-60 mile rides. Atlanta is pretty hilly and it feels like the perfect drivetrain for around here

    Full Disclosure: One of my other bikes is a single-speed with a 53:15; so I don't mind standing a bit (a lot on the single speed)

    Last edited by OldZaskar; 12-23-2017 at 09:17 AM.

  12. #12
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    ^ That sounds like a nice setup. Yeah, chain line is pretty important when it comes to backpedaling issues. I've also noticed that while the clutch is great at keeping the chain under tension, it can hurt shifting performance in some situations. That may be more of an issue with FS bikes though.

    I just put the 44t Wolf Tooth on my bike. We'll see how it goes. The chainring doesn't look great on the 6800 crank arm (there is a large step from the arms to the chainring), but it'll at least let me figure out if I want to buy a 1x Force crank and/or drivetrain, and what sort of size I'd like.


  13. #13
    What the what???
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    I just finished this project - and LOVE the result...

    - SRAM Force 1x crank with a 52t narrow-wide chainring
    - SRAM Force levers - right is an 11-speed and brake; left is just the brake
    - SRAM Rival rear derailleur (nice unit, has a clutch)
    - Shimano Ultegra cassette - 11-28

    Just dropping the inner ring off a 2x crank could work... maybe. The upside of the SRAM setup is that the chainring is centered and the narrow-wide teeth work to keep the chain seated.

    Backpedaling can a problem with 1x__ setups without some type of guide when the chainring isn't centered. The SRAM setup works great - backpedaling on the 11 and 28 won't drop the chain.

    The 52:28 is plenty of gear for sub-60 mile rides. Atlanta is pretty hilly and it feels like the perfect drivetrain for around here

    Full Disclosure: One of my other bikes is a single-speed with a 53:15; so I don't mind standing a bit (a lot on the single speed)

    Excellent. I have the Apex1 version of this on my commuter and really like it. Iím thinking of doing something like this for my next build as well.


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