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  1. #1
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    25mm to 28mm Tire

    I want to change from 25mm tires to 28mm. There is plenty of room in the fork. The question is the back. Presently I have a 25mm Continental Ultra Sport tire. I measured the clearance to the brake. It is about 9mm. Will a 28 mm tire fit?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    I want to change from 25mm tires to 28mm. There is plenty of room in the fork. The question is the back. Presently I have a 25mm Continental Ultra Sport tire. I measured the clearance to the brake. It is about 9mm. Will a 28 mm tire fit?

    Thanks in advance
    Only way to know is to try mounting the 28mm tire. Tire sizes vary among the manufacturers, thus only way to know what fits is to buy it and try it.

    Also watch the clearance at the chainstays.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Only way to know is to try mounting the 28mm tire. Tire sizes vary among the manufacturers, thus only way to know what fits is to buy it and try it.

    Also watch the clearance at the chainstays.
    Plenty of room at the chainstays.

  4. #4
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    Brakes can usually be adjusted. It's mainly the chain stays that are the limiting factor. If there is room there, then go for it!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    Plenty of room at the chainstays.
    I am referring to the top of the tire hitting the bottom of the brake.

  6. #6
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    What does your 25mm tire measure out to? On paper you will have 6mm clearance with the 28mm tire, so it should fit but you won't know till you try. But if you've got the room at the chainstays hopefully the manufacturer gave the frame matching clearance at the brake bridge.
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
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    Yes. Assuming you are not comparing two different tires or tire brands that use a completely different measurement standard, 9mm is plenty of room to move up 3mm in tires size.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Yes. Assuming you are not comparing two different tires or tire brands that use a completely different measurement standard, 9mm is plenty of room to move up 3mm in tires size.
    Exactly. Most 28mm tires are really more like a smidge over 27 anyway. And, a just few are closer to 30....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by harryman View Post
    Exactly. Most 28mm tires are really more like a smidge over 27 anyway. And, a just few are closer to 30....
    That all depends on the rim you are mounting it on. A tire that measures 28mm on a 15mm ID rim will measure 29mm on a 17mm ID rim.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That all depends on the rim you are mounting it on. A tire that measures 28mm on a 15mm ID rim will measure 29mm on a 17mm ID rim.
    I will be using a Mavic Open Sport rim. My only concern is the height. I have ample side room. Another concern is whether I will be able to get an inflated tire through the brake blocks. These are Ultegra brakes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    I will be using a Mavic Open Sport rim. My only concern is the height. I have ample side room. Another concern is whether I will be able to get an inflated tire through the brake blocks. These are Ultegra brakes.
    It shouldn't be. There will be plenty of room, with the brakes released. And is letting air out of a tire really a problem? (moot question because you won't need to do that.)

  12. #12
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    Just borrow a 28 and try it.
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