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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Have you thought about a tandem? It would give the two of you the opportunity to ride together without some of these issues. As long as you can match your cadences it could work. I've seen some pretty fair priced used tandems that could let you know if that would work, or maybe look into renting one for a coupla rides,

    And you would still have the singles so nobody would be tied to the tandem for all rides.

    I/we actually have. Unfortunately, I've been told that can actually be a relationship killer itself. Plus, I think I would have to be up front, so that would make her view my giant back. What fun is that? Ive seen some recumbent tandems that address the view issue, but that seems complex for what should be a simple fix.


    Say what you want critics. We did 22 mi tonight on something we call "The Classic Ride" as we've done it so many times before.

    When we got to an albeit steep and corkscrew decent, she stopped and walked it down.

    Mind you, she's biked it before, including on her former rim brake bike. She's on hydro disc now.

    I waited patiently at the bottom and didn't comment, but I can't get with you guys who say I should ignore it and just be happy.

  2. #52
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    PS guys, she's sitting at the table next to me as I type this, and she's not happy with that "walk down" this evening either.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I/we actually have. Unfortunately, I've been told that can actually be a relationship killer itself. Plus, I think I would have to be up front, so that would make her view my giant back. What fun is that? Ive seen some recumbent tandems that address the view issue, but that seems complex for what should be a simple fix.


    Say what you want critics. We did 22 mi tonight on something we call "The Classic Ride" as we've done it so many times before.

    When we got to an albeit steep and corkscrew decent, she stopped and walked it down.

    Mind you, she's biked it before, including on her former rim brake bike. She's on hydro disc now.

    I waited patiently at the bottom and didn't comment, but I can't get with you guys who say I should ignore it and just be happy.
    The stoker on a tandem is free to look where ever s/he wants, the captain needs to watch. I've met a blind stoker.

    And as far as "relationship killer" I'd say that with the way things are going now, that's the direction you're headed anyway.

    I honestly think that a tandem would be your best bet, but if you're not willing to try it, well that's your business and you know it better than me.
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  4. #54
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    PS guys, she's sitting at the table next to me as I type this, and she's not happy with that "walk down" this evening either.
    I can't think that someone would be ok w/ having to get off a road bike and walk. I can't understand how they'd even enjoy riding a road bike when easy things like that are above their skill lever and stay that way. Are you really sure she even wants to ride? Or ride w/ you? Doesn't she have any female friends to ride with? A lot of the things you say she can't or won't do are the kinds of things that you either get over in a few weeks or you never get over them. Seriously.
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  5. #55
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    Riding a bike is supposed to be fun. Nothing here sounds fun. And has all the sounds of someone doing something they don't want to, in order to please their partner.

  6. #56
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The stoker on a tandem is free to look where ever s/he wants, the captain needs to watch. I've met a blind stoker.

    And as far as "relationship killer" I'd say that with the way things are going now, that's the direction you're headed anyway.

    I honestly think that a tandem would be your best bet, but if you're not willing to try it, well that's your business and you know it better than me.
    I doubt a stoker that is terrified of speed would have fun on the back of a tandem w/ someone that likes to 'bomb' downhills.



    With zero control.
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  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Speed doesn't seem to be a major concern at this point. Control and confidence, yes.
    Bingo! And she can learn control and confidence on the same nice lightweight, responsive bike at slower speeds. She's got all the gears she needs. its keeping up with hubby that wears her out!

  8. #58
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Bingo! And she can learn control and confidence on the same nice lightweight, responsive bike at slower speeds. She's got all the gears she needs. its keeping up with hubby that wears her out!
    Only problem is that she's had years to learn and hasn't.
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Riding a bike is supposed to be fun. Nothing here sounds fun. And has all the sounds of someone doing something they don't want to, in order to please their partner.
    Yeah, Max. You have to get the prospective riding partner in shape to hang with you. She looks like she's in great shape from the picture above, but needs to increase her strength to weight ratio to get up those climbs. That means shedding a few pounds, a very difficult thing.

    CX does bring up a great point about the bike. Would she feel safer on fatter tires, longer wheelbase and slacker head tube angles? Heck, you could then go out with her on your mountain bike. That might be a cool way of learning confidence, without the constant if unspoken challenge of keeping up with a considerably stronger rider who wants to go fast and get a good workout.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I doubt a stoker that is terrified of speed would have fun on the back of a tandem w/ someone that likes to 'bomb' downhills.



    With zero control.
    Most tandems have a drum drag brake mounted on the rear hub for the specific reason of reigning in too much down hill momentum. There is no reason that can't be put in her control. Shux, that blind guy I mentioned in one of my earlier posts did all the shifting. His captain did all the seeing, braking and steering and all the shifting was done by what his legs told him. In his case it was almost like there was two captains on the bike.

    Besides that, people get on roller coasters all the time, with zero control. It comes down to trust.
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  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Heck, you could then go out with her on your mountain bike.
    That's an option too. Rather than using gadgets and technology to make her faster, do the opposite. A heavy cross bike, with some 32mm light knobby tires would probably even things out quite well. And be more comfortable on long rides than a mountain bike.
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  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Yeah, Max. You have to get the prospective riding partner in shape to hang with you. She looks like she's in great shape from the picture above, but needs to increase her strength to weight ratio to get up those climbs. That means shedding a few pounds, a very difficult thing.

    CX does bring up a great point about the bike. Would she feel safer on fatter tires, longer wheelbase and slacker head tube angles? Heck, you could then go out with her on your mountain bike. That might be a cool way of learning confidence, without the constant if unspoken challenge of keeping up with a considerably stronger rider who wants to go fast and get a good workout.

    Continued good suggestions.

    Yes, she actually is on her second mountain bike as well. Again, the main point of the upgrade was the move to hydraulic disc brakes.

    "Mountain biking" for her is relatively flat gravel fire roads and rail trails, but we do it.

    Our longest was a 60 mile round trip from Walden to Kingston and back on a couple of contiguous gravel rail trails. (If you go...don't attempt to run the trail through the prison grounds.)

    50/34 to 48/32 ?-screen-shot-2018-05-15-8.31.04-am.jpg

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    This thread is a ticking time bomb.
    This one and many others here on RBR.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I'll just suggest you go try some physical activity with something you suck at and go with people who are really good at it. Downhill mountain biking or ice hockey might be good if you've never done either. See how you feel about ignoring your protective instincts and about people who are good at it getting frustrated with you.
    ^This.^ You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Jay Strongbow again.

    Or better yet, participate in some activity (not necessarily physical) that you suck at and she is good at. This will give you a humbling perspective.
    Last edited by Lombard; 1 Week Ago at 04:41 AM.
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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Only problem is that she's had years to learn and hasn't.
    Again, she had a very unathletic youth. I was raised to play, get hurt, try things, etc. Her Mother always told her to be careful, and not do things.

    I've never seen or heard of anyone struggle to adapt to clip-less pedals more than she did.

    I ride Speedplay. She didn't seem to have the strenght/weight to pop in, even when set on easy tension. She would fall over.

    I ride Shimano on mountain bike, so we tried that. She would fall over.

    We tried in the gym and on a trainer, but somehow in the field her brain would forget the lesson and she'd fall over.

    It was so bad I cut up a bunch of old sweat socks to make custom rideable knee pad protection for the inevitable fall.

    Finally, my shop recommended Look Keo pedals. SUCCESS! I have no idea why they are easier or different, but she has NEVER fallen again since then.

    So that's where I/we're at. Technological solutions we can implement when human adjustments prove vexing.

  15. #65
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    Again, she had a very unathletic youth. I was raised to play, get hurt, try things, etc. Her Mother always told her to be careful, and not do things.
    Her "unathletic youth" is irrelevant. 7 years is a LONG time.

    Can't help but think there's more to this story.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    Again, she had a very unathletic youth. I was raised to play, get hurt, try things, etc. Her Mother always told her to be careful, and not do things.

    I've never seen or heard of anyone struggle to adapt to clip-less pedals more than she did.

    I ride Speedplay. She didn't seem to have the strenght/weight to pop in, even when set on easy tension. She would fall over.

    I ride Shimano on mountain bike, so we tried that. She would fall over.

    We tried in the gym and on a trainer, but somehow in the field her brain would forget the lesson and she'd fall over.

    It was so bad I cut up a bunch of old sweat socks to make custom rideable knee pad protection for the inevitable fall.

    Finally, my shop recommended Look Keo pedals. SUCCESS! I have no idea why they are easier or different, but she has NEVER fallen again since then.

    So that's where I/we're at. Technological solutions we can implement when human adjustments prove vexing.
    Let's face it, some people are just less coordinated than others. As far as her having an "unathletic youth", which came first, the chicken or the egg? Yes, upbringing has something to do with that, however, I believe we are all hardwired differently.

    If Bobby can do math, that doesn't necessarily mean Billy can do math.

    In other words, just because YOU can do something well doesn't mean EVERYBODY can do that well. And that can be for a number of reasons we still don't quite understand.
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  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Her "unathletic youth" is irrelevant. 7 years is a LONG time.

    Can't help but think there's more to this story.

    I've encouraged her to chime in here, but she's been a little busy with work.

    She says she will though.
    ___________________________________

    The additional part of the story is probably a biological issue we acknowledge.

    She gets seasick quite easily. Almost any boat. Ferry to Block Island to cycle...sick. Ferry from Cape May NJ to Lewes DE for the Seagull Century...sick.

    In addition, her mental compass appears to be installed backwards. Not a joke. In seven years, she's been directionally correct only once.

    Her consistent incorrect orientation is so reliable, I employ it to know 100% the answer is the other way.

    Not even kidding. We will emerge from a store with the car being left, and she will always turn right.

    Same thing on our "classic ride" or other rides we've done many times. Her brain must know the right answer, but somehow rejects it and delivers the wrong response.

    Last, in fairness, I restored her childhood bike I found languishing in her parents basement in Queens.

    She was once chased through the neighborhood on that yellow bike and crashed. Her two front top teeth are beautiful...and artificial. So there's probably that fear baked deep, deep down, in the recedes of her brain.

    Per pic below, I gave it to a step-nephew this weekend. He doesn't fit it, but loves it. (I can raise it a little, and he also took her gen-1 mountain bike)

    _______________________________________

    Again!... tech to help bridge gaps the mind and body cannot! The one thing we shall not accept is stopping or not trying.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 50/34 to 48/32 ?-img_3020-2.jpg  
    Last edited by MaxKatt; 1 Week Ago at 05:15 AM.

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