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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    It doesn't matter, because people don't all have the same kinds of muscle or fitness. That's why you dictating people's gearing is silly.
    You're right. I'm coming around to the wisdom of gears that allow rider to climb up a grade at 6 mph, about when my legs are starting to hurt at 60 rpm in 42-28. They'd be much happier spinning at 70-80 rpm, which you guys are saying is possible. That's awesome. Contador demonstrated it superbly well in last year's TDF, passing everyone in his easy gears while they were struggling in higher gears.

    In fact, I may be ready to go with 50/39 and 13-30. To complete the job would require a new bike, and at this stage of the game I'm reluctant to drop the cash. Pedaling 80, and when I can get away with it 90 rpm, is the preferred way to do these short hills, but typically run out of gears in 42-28, so should try something like 34-30, just to see how it works. I'd want a sub 20# bike to top it off.

    Just offering some perspective and history so OP can have some stuff to consider.

    As a newbie, cranking up a few of the short climbs out of Rock Creek Park in 42-21 used to be a gargantuan battle against nature, definitely a call for easier gears. It took years to "train up" to 42-21 and only by internalizing a smooth spin. It made a huge difference. The same climbs aren't quite the sufferfests they were the first few years 30 years ago.

    No question pedaling up hills at 80-90 rpm is perfect for learning how to spin. Merckx and Hinault both strongly recommended fast cadences at a time when racers were pushing harder gears at lower cadences. Pros rode fixed gear track in the winter to get their spin back after the season was over.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Do you realize that a 1 tooth jump between the 11-12 is more of a difference than the 2 teeth between 25-27?
    Yes, the graph clearly shows that. So get rid of the 11 for sure. 53-12 is also insane, so heck, start at 13 and add a 16 and 18. Those gears will work great in the small ring, too.

  3. #78
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    Do I sustain 80-90rpm going up a mountain? Yes? That's what normal people do. It’s becoming so clear to me that you post too much and don’t ride enough.



    Last edited by ceugene; 12-10-2017 at 06:41 AM.

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gall View Post
    Hello,

    Anyone using this set up?

    53x42 with a 11-34 cassette
    I guess it depends on 1) what conditions you are riding, and 2) how strong are your legs?

    My current road bike is an old school 13 - 24 on a six speed block with 54x41 up front. It gets a bit challenging on some of my local routes that have hills, but they are typically long 1% or 2% grades with some short stretches of *maybe* 8%. I would not want to try any really extended , steep climbs on this setup, but if you are strong enough, I guess it would work. But that high end, 53 x 11 is more gear that I want to push, except maybe for a downhill . . . if the bike has disc brakes!

    Then again, it is your bike, so you think you'd enjoy it, go for it!

  5. #80
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    Very interesting thread. I am a big 270# guy and there is no doubt that weight has a major impact on climbing. I am running a 46-34 crankset with a 12-28 10 speed on my Bianchi Infinito. I have climbed some pretty steep hills (15+ %) with this set up.
    My current problem is related to the OP. I am in the middle of a new build of a vintage Bianchi for Eroica California. My bike is a 1987 Bianchi with a braize on derailleur mount on the front. I can’t use a compsct crankset without hacking off the derailleur mount and going with a clamp on FD.
    So I am going to have to go with a 52-42 or 52-39 crank. Not sure if 42-28 big go on my freewheel is low enough for California. So I am looking at a 13-32 7 speed freewheel. Going to have go with a long cage rear derailleur. Could go with a MTB RD but I recently found a long cage rail kit from Soma fabrications. This will allow me to modify my vintage Campy Super RecordRD and use it with the 32 tooth freewheel. Still mulling my options. But,I am leaning towards this solution. Comments welcome.
    Last edited by bigjohnla; 01-04-2018 at 09:38 PM. Reason: Grammar

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnla View Post
    Very interesting thread. I am a big 270# guy and there is no doubt that weight has a major impact on climbing. I am running a 46-34 crankset with a 12-28 10 speed on my Bianchi Infinito. I have climbed some pretty steep hills (15+ %) with this set up.
    My current problem is related to the OP. I am in the middle of a new build of a vintage Bianchi for Eroica California. My bike is a 1987 Bianchi with a braize on derailleur mount on the front. I can’t use a compsct crankset without hacking off the derailleur mount and going with a clamp on FD.
    So I am going to have to go with a 52-42 or 52-39 crank. Not sure if 42-28 big go on my freewheel is low enough for California. So I am looking at a 13-32 7 speed freewheel. Going to have go with a long cage rear derailleur. Could go with a MTB RD but I recently found a long cage rail kit from Soma fabrications. This will allow me to modify my vintage Campy Super RecordRD and use it with the 32 tooth freewheel. Still mulling my options. But,I am leaning towards this solution. Comments welcome.
    Dunno. I have a brazed on front derailleur hanger set up for 52 large ring, but the derailleur can slide down the hanger far enough for a 50 ring and would probably go down far enough for a 48, anyway. How small an inner ring will the bolt circle accept? Heck, 48/39 would be fine with a 13-28 in back. How hilly is a fondo going to be for guys riding heavier bikes with no climbing gears? Keep that Bianchi as pure as possible! It was designed to be ridden in those gears. Pedal harder.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnla View Post
    Very interesting thread. I am a big 270# guy and there is no doubt that weight has a major impact on climbing. I am running a 46-34 crankset with a 12-28 10 speed on my Bianchi Infinito. I have climbed some pretty steep hills (15+ %) with this set up.
    My current problem is related to the OP. I am in the middle of a new build of a vintage Bianchi for Eroica California. My bike is a 1987 Bianchi with a braize on derailleur mount on the front. I can’t use a compsct crankset without hacking off the derailleur mount and going with a clamp on FD.
    So I am going to have to go with a 52-42 or 52-39 crank. Not sure if 42-28 big go on my freewheel is low enough for California. So I am looking at a 13-32 7 speed freewheel. Going to have go with a long cage rear derailleur. Could go with a MTB RD but I recently found a long cage rail kit from Soma fabrications. This will allow me to modify my vintage Campy Super RecordRD and use it with the 32 tooth freewheel. Still mulling my options. But,I am leaning towards this solution. Comments welcome.
    Sugino makes an adapter that allows you to lower the front derailleur enough to use smaller chainrings. It's a mite pricey, but it'll allow you to use your 46 tooth chainring without modification to your Bianchi.

    https://www.suginoltd.co.jp/us/produ...html#pnH4MT-OX

    Open the pdf within the link to see how it works.

    What crankset are you planning to use on the Eroica bike? An IRD has the look of a classic crank and comes as a 46\30.

    Defiant Super Compact Road Crank Set — Interloc Racing Design / IRD
    Too old to ride plastic

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Dunno. I have a brazed on front derailleur hanger set up for 52 large ring, but the derailleur can slide down the hanger far enough for a 50 ring and would probably go down far enough for a 48, anyway. How small an inner ring will the bolt circle accept? Heck, 48/39 would be fine with a 13-28 in back. How hilly is a fondo going to be for guys riding heavier bikes with no climbing gears? Keep that Bianchi as pure as possible! It was designed to be ridden in those gears. Pedal harder.
    Maybe for you. Now think about the rest of us mere mortals.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  9. #84
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    I have a 52-39 Campy crankset I can use. It is an Athena with silk screened graphics. Which I dislike immensely. So my problem is more cosmetic. I am going for an older look. I had purchased a Velo Orange 48 -36 old Campy style crankset but when I test fit it to the frame, I just could not get it low enough on the tab. The chain was going to rub. Could go with a triple FD or fab some sort of bracket but it won’t look clean. As for the hills, some are 15% grades on unpaved roads. Many folks have to walk their bikes up some of the hills. Jumping off and walking is just not my style. So I am working hard to lose some weight and harden up as well. I will be pedaling harder for sure!
    Last edited by bigjohnla; 01-05-2018 at 05:47 AM.
    Hold your line and keep on pedaling

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnla View Post
    I have a 52-39 Campy crankset I can use. It is an Athena with silk screened graphics. Which I dislike immensely. So my problem is more cosmetic. I am going for an older look. I had purchased a Velo Orange 48 -36 old Campy style crankset but when I test fit it to the frame, I just could not get it low enough on the tab. The chain was going to rub. Could go with a triple FD or fab some sort of bracket but it won’t look clean. As for the hills, some are 15% grades on unpaved roads. Many folks have to walk their bikes up some of the hills. Jumping off and walking is just not my style. So I am working hard to lose some weight and harden up as well. I will be pedaling harder for sure!
    https://www.suginoltd.co.jp/us/produ...html#pnH4MT-OX has fabbed the bracket and looks pretty unobtrusive. the users manual PDF explains it pretty well.
    Too old to ride plastic

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Dunno. I have a brazed on front derailleur hanger set up for 52 large ring, but the derailleur can slide down the hanger far enough for a 50 ring and would probably go down far enough for a 48, anyway. How small an inner ring will the bolt circle accept? Heck, 48/39 would be fine with a 13-28 in back. How hilly is a fondo going to be for guys riding heavier bikes with no climbing gears? Keep that Bianchi as pure as possible! It was designed to be ridden in those gears. Pedal harder.
    Jesus, just stop w/ your 'just pedal harder' crap. There are tons of riders that need lower gearing than what works for you.
    I work for some bike racers
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  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Jesus, just stop w/ your 'just pedal harder' crap. There are tons of riders that need lower gearing than what works for you.
    That's just Fred's way of trying to get people to think he has a big.......oh, nevermind!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #88
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    I have a Bianchi branded Ofmega that is a 52-42. Actually have two of them. They are modeled after a campy nuovo Record. 144 BCD so the chain ring options are fairly limited. This has been a fun project. I have learned a lot about cranks, derailleurs, BB tapers and chain line.
    Hold your line and keep on pedaling

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnla View Post
    I have a Bianchi branded Ofmega that is a 52-42. Actually have two of them. They are modeled after a campy nuovo Record. 144 BCD so the chain ring options are fairly limited. This has been a fun project. I have learned a lot about cranks, derailleurs, BB tapers and chain line.
    Slap that Nuovo Record crank on there. Go period correct.

    The square taper, if its an Ofmega spindle, will fit Campy Record of the time. If the arms clear the chain stays, you'll be fine with 52/42. It was the standard for quite a few years; few riders complained. Really heavy guys might have gone to a triple. 42 is just low enough to handle the hills on a fondo, assuming the whole course isn't dirt. Dirt will slow you down like quicksand, and dirt grades could be too steep for good handling in 42-28, usually because the skinny rear tire slips in the dirt. Once in a great while, might be over-geared, but no problem on paved roads. The main roads aren't graded so steep they can't be handled quite well in 42-28. That used to be standard on recreational bikes as well as racing bikes.

    These guys who think I'm just showing off are mistaken. This isn't going to be your main ride, anyway. If you wanna be period correct on the fondo, do it right. Its one ride. You won't die, believe me. These guys are splitting hairs. Going from 39-28 or whatever to 42-28 is only a 3 tooth difference. It ain't that big a deal.

  15. #90
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    Your chart doesn't show heart rate, so comparisons are difficult. But speeds are about the same as riders used to do in 42-28. 200-250 watts sounds about right for a moderately fit guy working just below anaerobic threshold, which is going to be the case when climbing. And yes, 90 rpm saves the legs, definitely an improvement as I've said above. But we're talking about a vintage set up for a fondo, not a main ride.

    I'll also take issue that "normal people" climb at 90 rpm. It takes several years to train up to the power required at those fast cadences. Most riders instinctively drop to 70-50 rpm when gravity slows him down. Either you're bringing some great aerobic fitness to cycling, or you've been riding at least a couple of years, right?

    Gotta respond to your snarky comment I don't ride enough. How many miles do you have in your legs? I've been riding since '79. That adds up to 150,000 miles on record, plus another 20,000 miles before I bought a speedometer. I've learned a few thing along the way.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Slap that Nuovo Record crank on there. Go period correct.

    The square taper, if its an Ofmega spindle, will fit Campy Record of the time. If the arms clear the chain stays, you'll be fine with 52/42. It was the standard for quite a few years; few riders complained. Really heavy guys might have gone to a triple. 42 is just low enough to handle the hills on a fondo, assuming the whole course isn't dirt. Dirt will slow you down like quicksand, and dirt grades could be too steep for good handling in 42-28, usually because the skinny rear tire slips in the dirt. Once in a great while, might be over-geared, but no problem on paved roads. The main roads aren't graded so steep they can't be handled quite well in 42-28. That used to be standard on recreational bikes as well as racing bikes.

    These guys who think I'm just showing off are mistaken. This isn't going to be your main ride, anyway. If you wanna be period correct on the fondo, do it right. Its one ride. You won't die, believe me. These guys are splitting hairs. Going from 39-28 or whatever to 42-28 is only a 3 tooth difference. It ain't that big a deal.
    The Ofmega does have a slightly different taper than the Campy. I have acquired one. The cups, bearings and lock nuts are pretty much interchangeable. I am choosing parts based on aesthetics, modolo sporting brakes, ambrosia bars. The only concessions I have made are the wheels will have Hplus sons Tb14 rims with Camoy Record hubs. I found a Middlemore saddle nos and and old nuovo record seatpost. Ordered vintage decals from Greg Softley. These are old style that match a 64 Bianchi I found pictures of on the web. This will be more of a vintage customization than a restoration.
    Hold your line and keep on pedaling

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnla View Post
    The Ofmega does have a slightly different taper than the Campy. I have acquired one. The cups, bearings and lock nuts are pretty much interchangeable. I am choosing parts based on aesthetics, modolo sporting brakes, ambrosia bars. The only concessions I have made are the wheels will have Hplus sons Tb14 rims with Camoy Record hubs. I found a Middlemore saddle nos and and old nuovo record seatpost. Ordered vintage decals from Greg Softley. These are old style that match a 64 Bianchi I found pictures of on the web. This will be more of a vintage customization than a restoration.
    Ofmega crank and spindle. Got it. I should read closer before responding!

    Ofmega had a reputation back in the day about the same in the pecking order as Shimano 105 and Ultegra today, decent stuff only looked down upon by the Campy snobs. Campy dominated the high end market at the time with no real contenders.

    Gonna post a picture of that nice Bianchi when its done?

  18. #93
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    Absolutely
    Hold your line and keep on pedaling

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