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  1. #1
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    Aluminum rear derailleur pivot bolt

    Any problem using these? They weigh WAY less than steel, less than Ti. Look cool too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Aluminum rear derailleur pivot bolt-derailleur_pivot_bolts.jpg  

  2. #2
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    No problem except that aluminum is generally a crappy material for small threaded parts, because it's too soft. If you want to take that chance to save a gram or two, who am I to say it's silly? (I think it's silly).

  3. #3
    Roadie with unshaven legs
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    Are those break-away bolts? Mountain bikers would change their steel pivot bolts with aluminum ones so that if something snags the rear derailleur the bolt snaps instead of the rear hanger. Either way, you're stranded on the side of the trail, but at least you didn't just ruin the frame (this was before they made replacable rear hangers). Carrying a spare meant that you can be on your way after replacing the bolt.

    As far as weight goes, my legs can't feel the difference between a 16 pound and a 21 pound bike, even at the top of a hill (though my times may be slower with the heavier bike? I don't know) so I doubt that you could tell from saving a few grams.

  4. #4
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    Replacing those pins should be pretty difficult. Remember they are under the pressure of the return spring. If you can get a piece of rod the will just clear the threads from the back side, and follow the bolt out with the rod, then it will be easier to re-insert the new bolt. I don't think it's worth the trouble either.

  5. #5
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    And they're hollow at the threads... Hmmm.. I bet there is more weight to save with less risk of complication in your choice of tires...

  6. #6
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    suntour is easier to change than shimano / shimano has super high spring tension (also shimano 1994 has different length pivot bolt than the other years) (shimano is very hard to get the bolt back in) / suntour is super easy to change has low spring tension

  7. #7
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    1) Aluminum has 1/3 the strength of steel. Add that to the hollow nature of the bolt, and I would consider these things "breakoffs", and not a 'permanent' bolt.

    2) If you put an aluminum bolt into a steel frame, it will become a 'corrosion cell', and will soon become stuck.

    If you are worried about a snagged derailleur bending your dropout, yes, it's a valid idea. But for weight reduction, you'd be much better off using a titanium bolt. They are strong, and don't corrode.

  8. #8
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 34505838 View Post
    suntour is easier to change than shimano / shimano has super high spring tension (also shimano 1994 has different length pivot bolt than the other years) (shimano is very hard to get the bolt back in) / suntour is super easy to change has low spring tension
    Awesome first post. It's a grammatical nightmare replying to a thread from over 8 years ago. I'm thinking that no one cares at all about this.
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  9. #9
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    Sorry-didn't see that this was a "zombie thread"............

  10. #10
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Sorry-didn't see that this was a "zombie thread"............
    But your post was well written and easy to read. And you weren't the one that dredged.
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  11. #11
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    Does Suntour even make derailleurs anymore?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  12. #12
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Awesome first post. It's a grammatical nightmare replying to a thread from over 8 years ago. I'm thinking that no one cares at all about this.
    It only took him 4-1/2 years to post that first doozy of a post.... heralding the greatness of a derailleur from a company that's been out of business for 20yrs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Does Suntour even make derailleurs anymore?
    No.
    By 1993, SunTour's share of the market had dropped to five per cent of the U.S. market. At the end of 1994, Mori decided to shut down their bicycle component business. In March 1995 Daisuke Kobayashi and Hideo Hashizume, the former owners of SR Sakae Ringyo, arranged a management buyout. The new management took over in July, 1995, purchasing the SunTour name and the SR factory in Taiwan. Mori Industries left the bicycle component business, selling off SunTour's Japanese facilities piecemeal.

    SR SunTour USA closed its U.S. offices in early 1995. The SunTour name lived on as SR-SunTour, but the SunTour component designs did not survive. The tooling that produced the once-prized Suntour derailleurs, shifters, and associated bicycle components was sold for scrap.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    It only took him 4-1/2 years to post that first doozy of a post.... heralding the greatness of a derailleur from a company that's been out of business for 20yrs.

    No.
    By 1993, SunTour's share of the market had dropped to five per cent of the U.S. market. At the end of 1994, Mori decided to shut down their bicycle component business. In March 1995 Daisuke Kobayashi and Hideo Hashizume, the former owners of SR Sakae Ringyo, arranged a management buyout. The new management took over in July, 1995, purchasing the SunTour name and the SR factory in Taiwan. Mori Industries left the bicycle component business, selling off SunTour's Japanese facilities piecemeal.

    SR SunTour USA closed its U.S. offices in early 1995. The SunTour name lived on as SR-SunTour, but the SunTour component designs did not survive. The tooling that produced the once-prized Suntour derailleurs, shifters, and associated bicycle components was sold for scrap.
    The only place I ever see the name Suntour anymore is on suspension forks and cranksets on low-end bikes. Looks like they went in the same direction as Schwinn.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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