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  1. #1
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    Any tricky about going from a triple to a compact double?

    I'm talking on the install side.

    I'm not liking my triple anymore for various reasons. I don't really want to go into the details on that because it's going to happen as the parts come in this Wednesday.

    I'm going from a 9 spd Tiagra to 10 spd SRAM Force. I got on a demo bike and really liked the Force set up. The only "tweak" is that I'm putting on a Rival Mid cage derailleur so I can use an 11-32 on my big climb days. I still like to spin up.

    I have had the almost all of this bike apart for at one point or another. Creaky BB, changed bar/stem etc. So, I can manage around my bike fairly well.

    Anything weird on SRAM set up? Or some "veteran" mech tweak that us way useful?
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  2. #2
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    Sram is pretty easy to set up.

    Just make sure that the FD is the proper height and inline with the crank, and you should be fine. The hardest part is getting the derailleur limits right, but the Sram instructions are pretty clear about how to set it up.

    As a side note, I've set it up with the shifter cable routed to the inside and to the outside. I've noticed no performance difference either way, though I prefer the look and feel of the cable routed to the inside.
    "It's supposed to be a challenge; it's a shortcut! If it were easy
    it would just be the way." - Road Trip

  3. #3
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    The rear derailleur is a straight forward process in setting up. The front derailleur setup can be a little tempermental. Once you get it setup, take a pocket screw driver with you and go for a road test. Set up the FD on the test ride. You will find that cable tension will be less than what you think it really needs.

    Run the cables with the widest bend possible to help prevent binding. I ran mine on the lower rear 1/4 of the bars. Doesn't intrude on the hands when riding, but gives the widest bend.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  4. #4
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    You will find that cable tension will be less than what you think it really needs.
    On that note, adjust both front derailleur limit screws before you hook up the shift cable (L > H > cable hook-up). It's different from the Shimano procedure (L > cable hook-up > H).

  5. #5
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    agree

    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    The rear derailleur is a straight forward process in setting up. The front derailleur setup can be a little tempermental. Once you get it setup, take a pocket screw driver with you and go for a road test. Set up the FD on the test ride. You will find that cable tension will be less than what you think it really needs.

    Run the cables with the widest bend possible to help prevent binding. I ran mine on the lower rear 1/4 of the bars. Doesn't intrude on the hands when riding, but gives the widest bend.
    I agree. The rear is very easy to set up. Follow the directions in the SRAM vidoes online. I found the front der to be quite tricky. Small chnages to the limit screws and tension can make a substantial difference in shifting perfromance. Take the time to make sure the FD cage is perfectly aligned with the drivetrain. You really need a couple of quick test rides to get it dialed in. Once I got it dialed it did not require any further tinkering. I was coming from Campy where the setup of the FD is pretty easy.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the advise everyone. Since it's raining, my test rides are going to be on the trainer
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg
    Thanks for the advise everyone. Since it's raining, my test rides are going to be on the trainer


    Your not going to be able to set up the front derailleur properly on a trainer. You need to ride the bike outside. When I switched to Sram Force last year, I tried to do the FD setup on my trainer. Could never get it to shift properly. Had to go for a little ride around the neighborhood.

    When on a trainer, there is too much chain tension on the cranks to allow the FD to shift smoothly. Once you slow your pedal speed, the FD shift goes to crap, on the road its not noticeable.


    But once you get the adjustments completed, and everything has settled into position - cables, ferrules, etc - you will find that adjustments will be far a few in between.

    Since I installed Sram on my bike, I've made 2 barrel adjustments - other than initial setup - 2 for the rear. Thats it.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Your not going to be able to set up the front derailleur properly on a trainer. You need to ride the bike outside. When I switched to Sram Force last year, I tried to do the FD setup on my trainer. Could never get it to shift properly. Had to go for a little ride around the neighborhood.

    When on a trainer, there is too much chain tension on the cranks to allow the FD to shift smoothly. Once you slow your pedal speed, the FD shift goes to crap, on the road its not noticeable.


    But once you get the adjustments completed, and everything has settled into position - cables, ferrules, etc - you will find that adjustments will be far a few in between.

    Since I installed Sram on my bike, I've made 2 barrel adjustments - other than initial setup - 2 for the rear. Thats it.
    thanks for the tip on trainer vs road set up on the FD. I'm sure I will find a break in the rain to get out and test around the block.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  9. #9
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    Everything went pretty well.

    My only quirks were the sram power link for the chain and the BB spacers.

    The instructions on the BB said 68 mm BB shells should use the 2 mm spacers. Well, that caused the crankset to bind when fully tighten. I removed them and it's perfect.

    Oh, and I hate these 10 speed power links from sram. a pain to get on!!!! They are not nearly as nice as the 9 spd version.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  10. #10
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    Easiest way to install the Powerlocks is to rotate the chain so the lock is at the top - between the cassette and the crank - hold the rear wheel and give the pedals a quick push. BOOM, it locks without problem.

    Should have read the directions for the chain. Tells you the exact same method as I have mentioned.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Easiest way to install the Powerlocks is to rotate the chain so the lock is at the top - between the cassette and the crank - hold the rear wheel and give the pedals a quick push. BOOM, it locks without problem.

    Should have read the directions for the chain. Tells you the exact same method as I have mentioned.
    I started another thread about this. Who reads the instruction for a chain?????? I never did. I guess I will have to start. With Shimano mtb chains now being directional, I should start.

    Oh the old days of chain installs...........................
    Take the old chain off and lay it flat on some paper towels.................
    Take the new one and lay it next to the old to get your length...............
    Take your chain tool and pop the pin
    Put the new chain back on..............

    The good old days..................
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

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