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  1. #1
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    Anyone have the Token Superlight CNC brakes (same as Planet X)?

    I have some questions on installing them if you have them.

    (Note: these brakes also go by some other names, like Featherlite, PlanetX, etc.. Apparently is all from the same company in Taiwan.)

    I have them installed on my bike, but it is somehow still rotate loosely along the center bolt, whereas Shimano brakes didn't. Not sure if this is by design or not. Also, I have a little hard time centering the front brake. But both the front and back work fine when I pull the levers though.

    btw performance wise, these little suckers can stop! They're more powerful than my old 6700 series Ultegra brakes. Amazing stopping power from such a small package (forget about what you hear about single pivot being weak, these are not). And they're also knock over 100g off my bike! I'm suprised not a lot more people use them instead of the typical Shimano/Sram stuff.
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    Last edited by aclinjury; 01-12-2012 at 11:21 AM.

  2. #2
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    Look like the Token Accura that I have. Mine are tight like normal and I use a wrench to centre them. Nuts too long maybe?
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

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  3. #3
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    I've got the Planet X version and mine are tight. They wouldn't stay centered if they weren't tight. Julio is probably right, check your bolt length. I center mine with a wrench also.

  4. #4
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    Hey mine is the Planet X version too.

    So let me understand you guys. Your calipers do not rotate about the center bolt at all? Mine will rotate if I just use my hands to rotate them (doesn't take much force either). However, the calipers are tight against the frame/fork though, that is, they don't move if I try to shake them fore and aft, but like I said they'll rotate about the center bolt though. Now if my bolt is too long, then wouldn't the calipers have moved around fore and aft too??

    And how do I use a shorter bolts? These calipers only come in with whatever bolts are on them.

    BTW, you center them by using a wrench on the black nut sitting between the frame/fork and the titanium head screw right??? And do you even to mess with this titanium hex screw at all? I'm not sure what adjust this titanium hex does.

    Funny thing is my bike brake fine, firmly, and no squeal, but somehow I sense it's not 100% mounted correctly.

  5. #5
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    On one of my bikes the supplied bolts wouldn't work with my fork, had to go to my LBS and get a shorter bolt. Your bolt might be short enough to take up the slack so there is no fore and aft movement but just a little too long to tighten sufficiently. Mine take a lot of pressure to move the caliper. Here is some info on the Planet X site.Tips on fitting the calipers:
    Mount the brake as centrally as possible using the main frame securing allen bolt.
    The small allen key screw located in the central barrel which secures down on to the central pivot bolt is to assist in centring the caliper arms once the main securing bolt has been tightened.
    There's also a small allen key grub screw on one of the caliper arms which tightens on to the main spring. Once the caliper has been centred using the main mounting bolt, the small allen grub screw can be used to 'fine-tune' the adjustment. By tightening it up, the tension on the spring will be increased and that caliper arm will move away from the rim. Loosen it off and the tension is released and the caliper arm will move towards the rim. It's very clever and kept some of us amused for hours. Want to save a few extra dollars? Choose the Forged Brakes (available in Black and Silver). Same fine quality as the CNC, only utilizing a forged process.re to move them by hand. The titanium hex bolt on the front can be use to center them also.

  6. #6
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    I finally figured it out and got it centered for good!

    Here's what I discovered

    1) the center titanium bolt is not too long. That is, a shorter bolt would still allow the caliper to rotate by force of hand

    2) the way you center the caliper is to use a 13mm wrench on the black central barrel. You do this after you have secured down the main titanium bolt (like the Planet X instructions stated).

    3) The black central barrel has 2 small allen key screws, not 1 like the Planet X instructions stated. I did not need to mess with these 2 screws. I simply use a 13mm wrench to turn the black central barrel, that is it.

    My brakes are now completely centered. I did not need to mess with the allen key grub screw on the side arm of the caliper (although this fine tune feature is a very clever feature to fine tune the centering of the caliper!).

    After some thought, I believe the caliper IS supposed to rotate about the center bolt! Why? Because let's suppose the caliper is not allowed to rotate (i.e., it is FIXED rigidly on the bolt), and let's suppose that the pads are not centered. Now imagine what would happen if you then clamp on the brake lever. What this does is to for 1 brake pad to make contact onto the rim (while the other pad have still yet to make contact with rim). Now as you continue to pull the brake lever, the pad already making contact WILL deflect the wheel to one side! You follow my logic here!?! But if the caliper is allow to rotate, then the pad making contact with rim first will not deflect the wheel because the caliper gives by rotating.

    This would explain why I was still able to brake flawlessly even though my pads were not perfect centered. This is because the rotation in a way allows the caliper arms to be "floating arms", i.e., the arms are self centering once the lever is pulled. It's just that if the caliper is perfectly centered, then the brake pad engagement is a little quicker, but it does not mean they will function any stronger.

  7. #7
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    Glad it all worked out for you. I think I wasn't real clear about the bolt being too long. What I meant was the nut that runs through the fork and rear stay and bolts to the titanium bolt being too long. That should be tight. If the nut is tight, the caliper will not move freely by hand but when properly adjusted, the pads will stay centered.

    My calipers don't move freely by hand and they are set up so both pads contact the rim at the same time. Not sure they are suppose to be set up as "floating" arms.

    Yeah, you can either use the 13mm nut or an allen key on the front titanium bolt to center the caliper.

  8. #8
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    This is a type of center pivot brake. Center pivot brakes pivot about the center. The spring is what centers them, and the spring is fixed to the mounting bolt, which has the aforementioned 13mm centering flats which you turn to with a wrench.

    The fact that double pivots can be centered by hand is actually the oddity. Old center pivot calipers could only be centered with some sort of wrench, or by tapping on the springs with a punch and hammer if they didn't have wrench flats. It is a simple, elegant system, and these brakes improve on them with the power cam on the left so they stop like double pivots.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  9. #9
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    Now I wonder if these brakes undergo some changes between your model and mine?
    My calipers are still being able to rotate by force of hand. I can rotate the calipers so that they appear to be off-centered. But as soon as I pull the brake levers to lock the pads up, and then release the brake levers, then the calipers returned to their centered position! Amazing huh?? It's as if these calipers (once centered) will self-centered themselves again even if I rotate them out of center position.

    And another thing. I can use the 13mm nut to center the caliper. But attempting to use the titanium bolt will not center the caliper. In fact, the titanium bolt is on so tight that I could not even loosen it with a 3in long hex key (and I did not try further by using a longer hex key). And if I do try to force the titanium bolt to turn, it will NOT turn, and all this does is to twist the steel sping out of its sockets (on the side arms).

    So for me, the most elegant, quickest, and simplest way to center the caliper is just to use a 13 mm wrench on the black center barrel nut.

    I wonder if I got an updated model of these suckers? I cannot what you guys are telling is so different than what I'm seeing if we have the exact same version of them

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    This is a type of center pivot brake. Center pivot brakes pivot about the center. The spring is what centers them, and the spring is fixed to the mounting bolt, which has the aforementioned 13mm centering flats which you turn to with a wrench.

    The fact that double pivots can be centered by hand is actually the oddity. Old center pivot calipers could only be centered with some sort of wrench, or by tapping on the springs with a punch and hammer if they didn't have wrench flats. It is a simple, elegant system, and these brakes improve on them with the power cam on the left so they stop like double pivots.
    Kontact, you posted while I was still writing.

    But I didn't say I could center them by hand. What I said was I could rotate the caliper by hand. I use the 13mm barrel nut to center the whole caliper apparatus. But the caliper would still remain freely rotatable by force of hand, but it also instantly re-center itself after you pull the lever in.

    At any rate, I must say this brake system is so damn awesome. They're (2 caliper set) is over 100g lighter than Ultegra 6700 series, and more powerful with the pads that came with them (not sure what kinda pads, but appears to be Swiss Stop Blue, not the green pads). I even locked up my rear wheel on a habitual grab that I do under the Ultegra brake. Ultegra never locked it, these ones do!

    Also, I've also read that if you want power from these calipers, it's best to leave a big gap between pads and rim so that the cam can move a good distance for the leveraging to kick in.

  11. #11
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    I have always used the 13mm nut to center mine also, I just noticed on the Planet-X site that they talk about using the titanium bolt. I ordered a pair for one of my bikes about a year ago and then ordered another pair less then a couple of months ago and they are identical.

    Seems to me that with yours loose, the thing that is keeping them centered is the stiffness of the cable housing. At least that's what I can picture.

  12. #12
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    OK I just checked again.

    What's keeping them centered is the steel spring (like Kontact stated), not the stiffness of the cable housing. Weird though, I can rotate the caliper so it's off-center, but as soon as I pull the lever and release the lever, the caliper return to its center position (this is assuming you have centered it already, which I did).

  13. #13
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    The bolt on the front is not for centering - it's what is holding the caliper arms to the center post, and is locked that way to hold the arms with minimal play but still allow them to turn - like a hub adjustment.

    You can't center the brake via the arms because you aren't turning the post directly, you're just putting pressure on the spring - like trying to lift something with a bungee cord.

    Center with the 13mm wrench, leave the front bolt alone, and keep the whole thing centered by making sure the mounting nut is tight.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  14. #14
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    Kontact that's pretty what I did to get it centered. Didn't even need to mess around with the side hex grub screw on one of the caliper sidearms!!

    I'm reading up on these brakes, and apparently some people reported their braking power to be "Zero Gravity" brakes, and nothing like their Shimano. Not sure why some people are experiencing the lack of stopping power, but I find to be stronger than my Ultegra

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Kontact that's pretty what I did to get it centered. Didn't even need to mess around with the side hex grub screw on one of the caliper sidearms!!

    I'm reading up on these brakes, and apparently some people reported their braking power to be "Zero Gravity" brakes, and nothing like their Shimano. Not sure why some people are experiencing the lack of stopping power, but I find to be stronger than my Ultegra
    Some of them come with crummy pads. Swissstops make them brake great.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    The bolt on the front is not for centering - it's what is holding the caliper arms to the center post, and is locked that way to hold the arms with minimal play but still allow them to turn - like a hub adjustment.

    You can't center the brake via the arms because you aren't turning the post directly, you're just putting pressure on the spring - like trying to lift something with a bungee cord.

    Center with the 13mm wrench, leave the front bolt alone, and keep the whole thing centered by making sure the mounting nut is tight.
    Yeah, I read Planet X instruction wrong. I thought they were talking about using the front bolt for centering, they were talking about the 13mm nut with the allen screw in it. I was wondering about that because I have always used the 13mm nut also.

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