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  1. #1
    Velocipediologist
    Reputation: metoou2's Avatar
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    Back by popular demand, blast from the past

    Has a frame (MODEL) ever been taken out of production and then brought back because the consumer's wanted it back?

    I'm not referring to a particular frame making technology or design approach. Many diff. companies have always 'borrowed' design ideas and manufacturing techniques from one another.

    To make it a little more simple, I'm asking about bikes from the 1970's and forward.

  2. #2
    Velocipediologist
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    Well heck................meant to put this in the General Discussion Thread. Maybe the Mods will move it.

  3. #3
    coaster
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    Electra Amsterdam. We have one at our shop and it's sick. Basically a brand new race bike from 1982 with Tange frame tubing, fork, headset, sealed bearing hubs, ect but with mustach bars, fenders, and a single speed. Every part down to the cable housing is authentic. Blast from the past for sure. The only modern touch is the pedals have a classic rat trap shape and platform on one side and an spd receiver on the other.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    GT Pulse came back for a second, with an integrated threadless headset setup.


  5. #5
    Velocipediologist
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    That GT is way cool. Will have to send the link to a buddy. He still rides a GT road bike from the 90's.

  6. #6
    Climbin' Clyde
    Reputation: Sablotny's Avatar
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    Did the Merckx MX Leader come back, or just stay in production a long time?


  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The names sometimes get brought back. GT brought back a few recently, and Schwinn's high-end models seem to go in and out of production from time to time. I think they've matched market segments, but I'm not sure how I'd even define them being the same model.

  8. #8
    Velocipediologist
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    The model name being brought back certainly qualifies for what I'm asking.
    The technology has progressed so how it is made is different, but the name (model) was so popular that the co. decided to re-release a bike with a model name from the past.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by metoou2 View Post
    That GT is way cool. Will have to send the link to a buddy. He still rides a GT road bike from the 90's.
    I would really like for GT to make another traditional geo, triple-triangle road frame like the ZR series. I mean technically yes, their current lineup includes some, but it's less aggressive looking with the sloping top tube and the Ti model is so far out of reach.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: boneman's Avatar
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    Kind of....Colnago

    Masterlight, replaced in 2004 with the Mastercarbon! Most people said WTF? The Master Carbon thankfully is a footnote in history.

    I took this picture at the 2004 World's in Verona.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Back by popular demand, blast from the past-dscn7665-large-.jpg  
    i've got limited minutes left in life, don't waste my time

  11. #11
    Velocipediologist
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    I never did 'get' the carbon rear ends. It's like some companies were just so desperate to get some carbon integrated into their frames.

  12. #12
    rebounder
    Reputation: naawillis's Avatar
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    ritchey swiss cross
    on the other hand, you have different fingers

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    There have been a few names barred for legal reasons ie Colnago's Master OLYMPIC , and Campagnolo's DAYTONA and maybe Trek's MATRIX had an issue too?

    back to your question , Kestrel is using the 4000 designation again I see, as well as Campagnolo Athena has been reborn and Centaur went from a MTB group to Road , and Super record got a long rest also.

  14. #14
    Velocipediologist
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    Quote Originally Posted by latman View Post
    There have been a few names barred for legal reasons ie Colnago's Master OLYMPIC , and Campagnolo's DAYTONA and maybe Trek's MATRIX had an issue too?

    back to your question , Kestrel is using the 4000 designation again I see, as well as Campagnolo Athena has been reborn and Centaur went from a MTB group to Road , and Super record got a long rest also.
    Good stuff, thanks

  15. #15
    Velocipediologist
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    Quote Originally Posted by naawillis View Post
    ritchey swiss cross
    I hope the Ritchey name lives on and on.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by metoou2 View Post
    I never did 'get' the carbon rear ends. It's like some companies were just so desperate to get some carbon integrated into their frames.
    Since monocoques weren't entirely feasible, industry would exploit the mixed design. Stiffer front, more "compliant" rear did seem like an idea approach for an aggressive rider.

    Carrera claims credit for having the first carbon rear bike in the peleton, and winning under Pantani


    But I totally get how it seems like a sham to appeal to consumers. It ended up on a lot of lower end frames when monocoques took off. However, note how the idea was abandoned altogether at some point, and brands switched to full aluminum in those tiers. One could argue that wouldn't make a bike better or worse, but it surely was more cost effective via hydroforming.

    I have a Ridley Boreas. Carbon rear version of their full aluminum Compact and full carbon Damocles. Interesting approach Ridley took making the same shaped bike in 3 material forms. IME there's no noticeable difference that the carbon rear makes.

    Maybe if I had to think way out there, the lugged juncture could've paved a way to replacement methods - being able to replace whatever half of the frame was damaged instead of the whole thing.

  17. #17
    Elmira > Taiwan > Elmira
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    Quote Originally Posted by metoou2 View Post
    I never did 'get' the carbon rear ends. It's like some companies were just so desperate to get some carbon integrated into their frames.
    It allows the manufacturer to have different tools with which to tune the ride (ie, compliance) of the rear end of the bike. You can construct members of different shapes, sizes and layups to get the characteristics that you want. It's much easier than trying to do the same thing in steel, aluminum or titanium as hydroforming tooling is also expensive.
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
    (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Proton wheels
    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

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