Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Bb90 durability

  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    209

    Bb90 durability

    I'm starting to consider switching to a Trek Emonda. The main concern I still have is BB90 durability. Considering the bearings are pressed directly into the carbon frame without any sleeve or nylon cups, I'm under the impression that a few bearings changes could mess up the tolerance over time and ruin the frame. Is it a valid concern? Or could a seized bearing grind out the carbon cups?

  2. #2
    Forever a Student
    Reputation: MMsRepBike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4,185
    I'd be more concerned with the tolerances to begin with and the creaking.

    BB90 isn't anything magical over BB30, they both suck really bad if you ask me. The problem with BB90 is there isn't much of a workaround for it, you're basically stuck with dealing it. So over time it will only get worse if anything.

    It's why I don't anything from Trek. Really stupid move on their part, really stupid.
    use a torque wrench

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    387
    I don't work for a Trek dealer, but I do work on a fair number of Treks. That said, it's actually one of the least problematic non-threaded BBs, at least the ones I work with have been problem free. They are up there with PF86 for reliability. The most problematic seem to be the narrow versions, i.e. true BB30 and PF30. Even in those cases when you do everything right problems are far less common than many people realize.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by rcb78 View Post
    I don't work for a Trek dealer, but I do work on a fair number of Treks. That said, it's actually one of the least problematic non-threaded BBs, at least the ones I work with have been problem free. They are up there with PF86 for reliability. The most problematic seem to be the narrow versions, i.e. true BB30 and PF30. Even in those cases when you do everything right problems are far less common than many people realize.
    But aren't problems almost sure to happen down the road, as insertion and removal of bearings start to take a toll on the frame?

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    387
    In theory yes, and certainly if the owner doesn't keep the bearing preload adjusted properly. However, if it's properly maintained you will likley change bikes before that happens. The bearings are slip fit, not press fit. So the R&R process should not be destructive at all. Even if damage does occur, Trek sells a bearing set with an over-size OD. And if it goes past that, I've been told you can send the frame in for repair. If someone here works for a dealer, I'm sure they can expand on that.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,036
    Unless you anticipate frequently removing and re-installing the bearings, I can't imagine this being a concern. Routine bearing replacement over the life of the bike should not be enough to cause problems, assuming it's done properly (using the proper tools)

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    156
    Just anecdotal, but every bike I've bought in the the last few years has had clicking, creaking bottom bracket problems EXCEPT my 2013 Trek Domane with BB90. I had the bearings replaced after 4000 miles because one was feeling rough when the crank was out. The new ones are are silent and smooth too. I am 6'3" and 200 lbs. and put a lot of force into the BB.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,384
    Unless you are riding in the rain alot, or dirty environment you should be able to get plenty of miles between changes on those bearings. The ones in my Domane today have over 15,000 on them and are still smooth. If the frame get's to worn for a nice fit with the standard bearing, Trek has a bearing you can get that is a little oversized. Eventually it will wear out sure, but you'll probably swap frames before then unless you plan on keeping it for much over 50,000 miles of riding.
    Nothing succeeds like excess

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    209
    Thanks a lot for all the answers, very interesting

    Envoyé de mon XT1563 en utilisant Tapatalk

  10. #10
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    11,410
    BB90. Not. A. Problem.

    That's after hundreds and hundreds over the last nearly 10 years. And being good friends w/ a fellow mechanic that works for a UCI Womens ProTour team on Trek. rcb78's comments are right on.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

Similar Threads

  1. DA9000 on BB90, which spacers
    By JackDaniels in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-17-2015, 07:49 AM
  2. BB90 to BB30
    By Eirikur in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-20-2014, 12:42 PM
  3. GXP into BB90
    By adam_mac84 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-11-2014, 05:55 PM
  4. Bb90
    By Pattonn in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-28-2012, 03:22 AM
  5. BB90 for Campy 10 UT Cranks
    By TheHamster in forum Campagnolo
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-07-2011, 05:49 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •