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  1. #1
    Have good, get give
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    Best way to find source of creak at very high force?

    I'm getting a creak sound near the cranks when I'm doing serious climbing. It's once per pedal rev and it's pretty loud. How can I tell if it's the bottom bracket or something else (what?).

    What's the usual course of action to take here? I'm really at this point only able to do the "bike 101" type maintenance stuff.
    babyarm

  2. #2
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    Rule out the head set. Place your hands on hoods. Alternate putting weight on one then the other. If you hear the creak, the headset probably just needs to be taken apart, cleaned and greased. Happened to me after much riding in the rain...
    Last edited by woodys737; 05-18-2009 at 11:33 AM.

  3. #3
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    You many find the following links helpful in tracking it down:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/creaks.html

    AND

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=123

    It's usually just a matter of patiently removing, cleaning,
    re-lubing, and re-torquing fasteners until it quiets down.

    [Note: even if nothing in those links is helpful to you, I figure it may help the next person who does a keyword search to solve their click/creak issue....]

  4. #4
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    try easy stuff, first

    I typically try the easy stuff, first. Check tightness and/or tighten chainring bolts, pedals, cleat bolts, crank bolts, stem at both steer tube and handlebars. If still there, I'd pull and lube/tighten bottom bracket, and/or remove chainrings and lube interface between rings and spider and bolts/rings.

    Check closely for frame cracks, too.

    If it happens seated, too, check tightness and/or lube seatpost and seatpost clamp on saddle rails.

    Could be junk in seat bag.

    Then hub bearing tightness, front and back, skewers, cassette, spokes pinging or creaking (check spoke tension).
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  5. #5
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    I just went through this this weekend. I knew that it wasn't the saddle or seatpost (still made the noise while standing), and that it wasn't the headset (bar check like Woody suggested). At that point, it was easier to remove the pedals, the crankset, and pull the bottom bracket than it was to search any further. I removed everything, greased the snot out of it, tightened the chainring bolts, and reinstalled everything.

    The ride to work this morning was a quiet one

  6. #6
    No Crybabies
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    satisfaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Becky
    I just went through this this weekend. I knew that it wasn't the saddle or seatpost (still made the noise while standing), and that it wasn't the headset (bar check like Woody suggested). At that point, it was easier to remove the pedals, the crankset, and pull the bottom bracket than it was to search any further. I removed everything, greased the snot out of it, tightened the chainring bolts, and reinstalled everything.

    The ride to work this morning was a quiet one
    Making a noise go away is about the most satisfying bike maintenance task, isn't it? ;-) I hate noises.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    When my fist clenches, crack it open
    Before I use it and lose my cool
    When I smile, tell me some bad news
    Before I laugh and act like a fool

  7. #7
    Have good, get give
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    Reading that sheldon link makes me want to check my pedals first. Might put some street shoe pedals and bear down on it to see if it's still there.
    babyarm

  8. #8
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    I had this last year. I lubed and tightend the pedal threads

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixed
    Making a noise go away is about the most satisfying bike maintenance task, isn't it? ;-) I hate noises.
    Absolutely!

  10. #10
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    All good suggestions

    Go with easy stuff first
    1. Check tightness if rear QR skewer
    2. Check rear hub for play
    3. Check pedals, shimano manual calls for shoving water proof grease into spindle if creaks develops
    3. Chain ring bolts, remove, clean, retighten
    4. Check BB/crankset for play
    5. Headset, clean retighten
    6. Seatpost, clean, lube with teflon if needed
    7. Stem/handlebar clean retighten
    8. Examine BB area of the frame for cracks
    2009 Specialized Langster Moscow
    2009 Trek 2.3
    2007 Specialized Tarmac Expert red/white
    (Ultegra cranks, Ksyrium Es wheels)
    2001 Gary Fisher Marlin (gone, my first MTB)
    2002 Lemond Buenos Aires
    2005 Specilaized Stumpjumper disc yellow
    2005 Specialized Stumpjumper silver
    2006 Gary Fisher Piranha
    1999 Univega Tandem

  11. #11
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    chainring bolts

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by culdeus
    I'm getting a creak sound near the cranks when I'm doing serious climbing. It's once per pedal rev and it's pretty loud. How can I tell if it's the bottom bracket or something else (what?).

    What's the usual course of action to take here? I'm really at this point only able to do the "bike 101" type maintenance stuff.
    One problem is that sounds that seem to originate from a particular location could be a sound traveling from another location. Another thing that complicates the process of finding the source is the fact that a lot of things happen "once per pedal rev". The pedals go around once, the cranks, rings, and bottom bracket go around once. Your legs go around once. Your weight shifts once. You alternate pulling on the handlebars with each hand once. Lots of things.
    It helps if you have spare parts, like a second set of shoes, spare wheel set, etc.
    You can try to see if it happens while your seated, standing, or both.
    See if adding more pressure or less pressure on the handlebars changes things.

    But the key to lasting piece of mind is eliminating one factor/variable at a time. If you go ahead and take everything apart and grease everything, reassemble, and the sound disappears, you're left clueless as to the cause, and if it returns, you're back to where you started.

  13. #13
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    Ended up being the seatpost on mine.

  14. #14
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    Carboard Tube

    When you have an unidenified noise and cannot tell where its coming from, put your bike in an indoor trainer. Get someone to use a cardboard tube ( like one in a kitchen roll) to listen through - this will pinpoint where your noise emanates (or your money back!)

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