Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    139

    Is carbon paste absolutely necessary for bike?

    Talking to a friend who was asking about my Titanium bike that I built up. He wanted to know how I built it up & other tidbits. Which brought up the question of carbon paste. I didn't use any on any of the contact points between the frame & parts as I didn't experience any slippage at all. FYI, I'm using carbon seatpost & alloy stem with full carbon fork.

    I've been riding it with no problems at all & no slippage on any of the parts has occurred. He was going on how he was under the impression that it was an absolute must to use carbon paste on all builds. Am I wrong? Is it an absolute must even if no slippage is occurring? And I will be overhauling this bike at the end of the season.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    240
    It is absolutely necessary on some bikes, in some places. Particularly the seatpost. I've had a couple that absolutely would slip with proper torque applied if I didn't use carbon friction paste.

    In most cases, it probably just falls into the 'It's always a good idea' category. If you've ever had a bar rotate going over a bump, or a seatpost slip down on you, you know it's no fun, and can be extremely dangerous. Applying some friction paste will help prevent those things from happening and possibly reduce the tempation to over torque, and thus damage your expensive parts.

    The stuff isn't expensive, and other than being a little messy, there is really no reason *not* to apply it, so why skip it?

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,918
    Quote Originally Posted by stan01 View Post
    Talking to a friend who was asking about my Titanium bike that I built up. He wanted to know how I built it up & other tidbits. Which brought up the question of carbon paste. I didn't use any on any of the contact points between the frame & parts as I didn't experience any slippage at all. FYI, I'm using carbon seatpost & alloy stem with full carbon fork.

    I've been riding it with no problems at all & no slippage on any of the parts has occurred. He was going on how he was under the impression that it was an absolute must to use carbon paste on all builds. Am I wrong? Is it an absolute must even if no slippage is occurring? And I will be overhauling this bike at the end of the season.
    carbon paste is not required but it seems like a good idea. Now using some sort of Anti-seize where other metals attached to your Ti frame (like BB cups) is something I would not skip

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,588
    Chain lube isn't absolutely necessary so asking if it's an absolute must is probably the wrong question about anything but you might have to wait 10 years or however long it takes for a carbon post to get bonded into a metal frame to get the true answer.
    Grease works fine to. But I don't know why anyone would want to increase the chance of slippage or torque required to prevent it when they could decreases it with carbon assembly paste.
    Last edited by Jay Strongbow; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:49 AM.

  5. #5
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,045
    Quote Originally Posted by stan01 View Post
    Am I wrong? Is it an absolute must even if no slippage is occurring?
    No you're correct. If there's no slipping you don't need it.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    500
    I mean, a saddle isn't absolutely necessary, but you probably want one.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,170
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    No you're correct. If there's no slipping you don't need it.
    Correct. In fact, in some circumstances, Iíve seen assembly paste make it *really* hard to subsequently remove a part (seat post etc.), hence the existence of products like ďCarbo-move.Ē These days, most carbon bars and many aluminum and carbon stems come with textured surfaces at the interface, so Iíve found assembly paste to be unnecessary and redundant. On my Dogma and 2018 R5, I even use a thin layer of Dura-Ace grease on the seat post and have had no slippage - I had some creaking from the Dogma post when using assembly paste which the grease fixed.

    OTOH, on older bars/stems without texture or with lesser amounts, assembly paste isnít the worst idea, and I have had some seat posts that would slip without past, so YMMV and use what works for your situation, But, itís not a requirement.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

Similar Threads

  1. Paste or no Paste on Carbon Steerer
    By Robert1 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-22-2012, 05:59 AM
  2. Carbon assembky paste/gel - recomendations
    By SpokaneSteve in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 06-20-2012, 06:17 PM
  3. carbon assembly paste for alloy seatpost in carbon frame
    By fah35 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-15-2010, 07:44 AM
  4. carbon assembly paste
    By tjjm36m3 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-12-2010, 05:53 AM
  5. carbon seat post paste put on?
    By lawrence in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-01-2007, 02:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.