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  1. #1
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    Carbon v titanium.

    When inserting a carbon post into a titanium frame is there a correct lube/protective? Grease, copper slip?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    I would use carbon paste.

  3. #3
    Cranky Old Bastard
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    You don't grease carbon, the problem is not that it will stick in the frame. The problem is getting the post tight enough that it doesn't slip. If you tighten it too much you'll damage the piece.

    You have to use some kind of carbon assembly gel. It increases the friction so you don't have to overtighten the clamp.

    I use Finish Line Carbon Fiber Assembly Gel that I got at performance for around $8.
    I think some of the companies that make the CF sell their own gel.

    And you can research the max torque for the clamp on the CF manufacturers' website.
    "When you know absolutely nothing, anyone who knows 1% more than nothing sounds like an expert."

  4. #4
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    I'll try carbon paste. Might have guessed there would be something specific. I'm building a new bike and feel like I'm finally entering the modern age with my new fancy carbon components.
    Cheers!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy99CL View Post
    ... I use Finish Line Carbon Fiber Assembly Gel ...
    +1 ... I use that with my alloy stem and carbon bars too.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy99CL View Post
    You don't grease carbon.
    Really? And to think I've been greasing a CF seatpost for nearly a decade! It's never slipped once. What am I doing wrong?

    Snark aside you need assembly paste if normal clamping force on the seatpost collar doesn't prevent slippage. Otherwise grease is fine.

  7. #7
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    The only reason you would need regular grease is to ease assembly.
    Embrace the fact that everyone on these forums has their own unique desires, needs, experiences and environment so what works for you may not work for others.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Really? And to think I've been greasing a CF seatpost for nearly a decade! It's never slipped once. What am I doing wrong?

    Snark aside you need assembly paste if normal clamping force on the seatpost collar doesn't prevent slippage. Otherwise grease is fine.
    Good for you! But depending on the tightness of the fit and the finish on the seatpost and inside the seat tube, the difference between "never slips" and "oops, it cracked" can be small. It is therefore reasonable to use carbon paste all the time. Even more so for someone who has to ask this sort of question on a forum, since they almost certainly won't have developed a good feel for required torque yet.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy99CL View Post
    You don't grease carbon, the problem is not that it will stick in the frame. The problem is getting the post tight enough that it doesn't slip. If you tighten it too much you'll damage the piece.

    You have to use some kind of carbon assembly gel. It increases the friction so you don't have to overtighten the clamp.

    I use Finish Line Carbon Fiber Assembly Gel that I got at performance for around $8.
    I think some of the companies that make the CF sell their own gel.

    And you can research the max torque for the clamp on the CF manufacturers' website.
    I do and it does not slip.
    But yes, use the right torque setting.

  10. #10
    Matnlely Dregaend
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    I use carbon paste. Anything in a Ti frame needs either lube or paste, or it will creak incessantly.
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  11. #11
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    Good point. I have been trying to silence my post for a few weeks now. The rest of the bike is silent though.
    Embrace the fact that everyone on these forums has their own unique desires, needs, experiences and environment so what works for you may not work for others.

  12. #12
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    A few year ago when I bought my first TI frame, I fitted a carbon seat post dry.
    A few months later ( and it was only a few months ) when I came to adjust the saddle it wouldn't budge. I had to cut it off to get it out. What I saying is this. The proper gritty stuff you can get would be best. Since my bad experience I have always used grease and have not had any problems. What ever you use USE something to stop the seatpost bonding itself to the frame.
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  13. #13
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    @op. Carbon Paste/Grease is what's needed. This will allow you to lower clamping force yet retain proper grip. this is grease with small sand like grit embedded.

    Aside from providing grip, this also helps prevent seizing.
    check my review page below!

    www.roadiemanila.com

  14. #14
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    If you're out of Carbon Paste use tooth paste. Works like a charm.
    Check out my RBR gallery.

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