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Thread: Chain

  1. #1
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    Chain

    Newbie here folks. Currently (and the foreseeable future) on a Giant Defy 2. Only been riding for about 9 months. Basic question.... How long does a stock chain last? Mileage wise. Rode about 2,000 on my current one.

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    It lasts until it's elongated to between .5%-.75%.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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    To quote Kerry, 'how long is a piece of string?'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giant331 View Post
    Newbie here folks. Currently (and the foreseeable future) on a Giant Defy 2. Only been riding for about 9 months. Basic question.... How long does a stock chain last? Mileage wise. Rode about 2,000 on my current one.
    The mileage expected from a chain varies so much across riders, due to riding conditions and maintenance practices that it's hard to give a ballpark estimate that couldn't easily be off by a thousand miles or more, so the go-to test is to get a good ruler (metal ones are favored), and measure 12", starting from any chain pin; at the 12" mark, a new chain will have a chain pin exactly 12" away from whatever one you started on. As the chain wears, this distance increases, and at about 1/8" "extra" length, you should get a new chain.

    There are tools made to measure chain wear, but there are lots of folks who don't think they work well (do a search on "Park chain tool" and you'll see the arguments), and most would agree that the ruler method works.
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    Generally speaking if you wait until shifting is poor you waited too long. Keep your chain clean and lubed and it will last longer.

    If you buy a cheap chain it will not last as long. If you don’t clean or lube your chain it won’t last long. Chains are cheaper than cassettes. People use many different types of lube.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Giant331 View Post
    Newbie here folks. Currently (and the foreseeable future) on a Giant Defy 2. Only been riding for about 9 months. Basic question.... How long does a stock chain last? Mileage wise. Rode about 2,000 on my current one.
    The best answer to this is - it depends.

    It depends on whether you ride on only paved roads or on dirt.
    It depends on whether you ride only in fair weather or in rain.

    Hopefully, this will not turn into another thread about whose choice of chain lube is best. We have too many of these already. I will just tell you that our very well respected Mike T. in our Wheels & Tires forum has a very simple home brew he uses that he got 11,000 miles on his last chain. You can read about it here:

    Chains

    YMMV.

    And as others here have said, the best tool for measuring chain wear is not some special tool, but the humble ruler.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The best answer to this is - Mike T. in our Wheels & Tires forum has a very simple home brew he uses that he got 11,000 miles on his last chain. You can read about it here:

    Chains

    YMMV.

    And as others here have said, the best tool for measuring chain wear is not some special tool, but the humble ruler.
    This article is all you need to know about chains Thanks Mike!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The best answer to this is - it depends.
    Yup, it's the only answer.

    OP, as an extreme example: I've cooked chains in 700 or so miles on my cross bike that gets used in wet dirty conditions and the style of riding that's prone to suspect shifting habits. The chain on my trainer only bike is going fine after about 5000 indoor 'miles'. And given there there is no coasting at all on the trainer, that's a lot in the context of comparing to outdoor miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xxl View Post
    As the chain wears, this distance increases, and at about 1/8" "extra" length, you should get a new chain.
    It's been nearly 20 years since the chain/component companies changed this to 1/16" elongation. THat's 0.5% elongation.

  10. #10
    xxl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    It's been nearly 20 years since the chain/component companies changed this to 1/16" elongation. THat's 0.5% elongation.
    Yes, typo on my part.
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    Based on all the previous responses, the right answer is - It Depends. But This Tool could help you decide when it's time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical View Post
    Based on all the previous responses, the right answer is - It Depends. But This Tool could help you decide when it's time.
    This tool is better and you probably already have one:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chain-tape-measure.jpg  
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    To quote Kerry, 'how long is a piece of string?'
    How did I know that was coming.....
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