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  1. #26
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    Yes I am, thanks for asking.

    Time zone differences and physio appointments meant that this is going to be a Good Friday job. Which is idea for fettling, as then I've a 200km ride on Saturday. So on the bright side that's going to provide plenty of opportunity to test it out. On the downside then that's going to be one long walk / singlespeed epic.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by duncan74 View Post
    Duncan, that chain is too long. The RD is almost vertical to the ground similar to having RD on smaller cog (like in the 2nd photo below). Below are a couple reference photos of my 11/32 setup - 50/32 and 50/11. Notice the differences. I have no issues with chain slap/drop.

    Just One Man's Opinion.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chain dropping off right side of cassette on downhills-rd-photo.jpg   Chain dropping off right side of cassette on downhills-rd-photo-2.jpg  
    Last edited by Methodical; 04-02-2018 at 06:23 AM.

  3. #28
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    Sorry for not updating earlier. On Friday I went through all the advice above (not chain length related) and changed the limit screws, B-screw setup and in the end cable tension. Then put it through it's paces on a 205km ride with 2700m climbing and descending.

    So in all that then the chain stayed on the cassette without jamming. However, that was by changing to the 12tooth and not staying on the 11th when descending, and it jumped a couple of times. Looking down at the chain and there was certainly some harmonic going on that was making it wobble sideways, so after all that then I have ruled out all the reversible options, and so now it's time to take a couple of links out and see how that goes.

  4. #29
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    Without reading through all of this again, how many miles on the chain & cassette?
    BANNED

  5. #30
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    How many links is your chain now, out of curiosity?

  6. #31
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    New bike end December, was doing this from new. Now about 2000km.

    Not counted the number of links.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by duncan74 View Post
    New bike end December, was doing this from new. Now about 2000km.

    Not counted the number of links.
    The number of links don't really matter unless you know the chainstay length. Can you take that photo of the bike in small/small?
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  8. #33
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    Chainstay length is easy as it's on the Cannondale website. I put that into the calculator, and perhaps I need to just go with the recommendation (after counting current links), but I've always gone with 'feel' or overlap+2 in the past.

    I will take a photo tonight. Apologies, timezone differences are making this thread a bit stop / start.

  9. #34
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    I don't know of anybody who counts links unless they are replacing a chain that is known to be the correct length.

    As CX said, could you send a pic of the drivetrain in the small/small combo?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #35
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    Oh dear. So I'm half too embarrassed to post these photos, half expecting that you're going to think this is now a windup.

    So to recap 2 relevant facts in my defence. 1) This is the first bike I've not built myself, and so not setup and sized the chain from the outset. 2) I followed the advice above in this thread to go through and critically set the B-screw (and even went and followed the park-tools video for that too). Just to make sure I was doing it right.....

    Chain dropping off right side of cassette on downhills-20180403_190305.jpg

    On the plus then i think we can now reasonably conclusively say the chain is too long. And as a result that had led to the 'mechanic' that built the bike needing to change the b-screw and that in turn left the rear mech too far off the cassette, and so that was what was causing the chain to be able to jump. And note I rode 205km with it like this on Saturday. Proves that I don't cross chain when riding.....

  11. #36
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    Chain dropping off right side of cassette on downhills-20180403_190044.jpg

  12. #37
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    Just to be clear, the bike shop said that this was ok and within spec or did your adjustments make the chain this way? Clarification please. Thanks

  13. #38
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by duncan74 View Post
    Oh dear. So I'm half too embarrassed to post these photos, half expecting that you're going to think this is now a windup.

    So to recap 2 relevant facts in my defence. 1) This is the first bike I've not built myself, and so not setup and sized the chain from the outset. 2) I followed the advice above in this thread to go through and critically set the B-screw (and even went and followed the park-tools video for that too). Just to make sure I was doing it right.....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20180403_190305.jpg 
Views:	42 
Size:	132.9 KB 
ID:	322272

    On the plus then i think we can now reasonably conclusively say the chain is too long. And as a result that had led to the 'mechanic' that built the bike needing to change the b-screw and that in turn left the rear mech too far off the cassette, and so that was what was causing the chain to be able to jump. And note I rode 205km with it like this on Saturday. Proves that I don't cross chain when riding.....
    The good news is you found the problem!!!

    That looks like 40+ something not an 11/32 if I counted the cogs half way around correctly.
    Last edited by Srode; 04-03-2018 at 12:40 AM.
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  14. #39
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    So to recap, that appeared after I set the b-screw correctly. With the b-screw set as it was by the mechanic, this had the mech rotated and the chain not drooping. However the jockey was a mile off the cassette.

    Does make me worry about the rest of the build....... Although given I didn't spot that after fettling on Friday (I focussed on the Big/big and big small combos on the workstand).

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by duncan74 View Post
    Oh dear. So I'm half too embarrassed to post these photos, half expecting that you're going to think this is now a windup.

    So to recap 2 relevant facts in my defence. 1) This is the first bike I've not built myself, and so not setup and sized the chain from the outset. 2) I followed the advice above in this thread to go through and critically set the B-screw (and even went and followed the park-tools video for that too). Just to make sure I was doing it right.....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20180403_190305.jpg 
Views:	42 
Size:	132.9 KB 
ID:	322272

    On the plus then i think we can now reasonably conclusively say the chain is too long. And as a result that had led to the 'mechanic' that built the bike needing to change the b-screw and that in turn left the rear mech too far off the cassette, and so that was what was causing the chain to be able to jump. And note I rode 205km with it like this on Saturday. Proves that I don't cross chain when riding.....
    Holy shyte! If any shop I went to didn't catch this, I would NEVER let that mechanic touch my bike ever again. Yikes! There should ALWAYS be some tension even in the small/small combo.

    I think you know what to do from here.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #41
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    "Mechanic", that's funny. I really hope you have another shop near by, and yes, you should be worried about everything else on that bike.

  17. #42
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Is the rear derailleur installed correctly? Meaning the proper angle on the dropout? The chain is definitely long, I'd confirm that the derailleur is sitting against the tab on the hanger correctly then you're probably looking at 2 link sets to remove. I'm guessing whoever installed the chain didn't remove any links before joining. It happens.
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  18. #43
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    CX....... uncharacteristically charitable on your part.
    OP, time for a new "mechanic"......

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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Is the rear derailleur installed correctly? Meaning the proper angle on the dropout? The chain is definitely long, I'd confirm that the derailleur is sitting against the tab on the hanger correctly then you're probably looking at 2 link sets to remove. I'm guessing whoever installed the chain didn't remove any links before joining. It happens.
    Wow. Someone hacked into Cx's account. In view of the situation, the reply was unbelievably kind.

    OP's shop built the bike and checked it two times. After at least three looks, the shop thought it was good. That is complete BS.

    No doubt at all that something is way wrong. The chain is clearly too long. The derailleur hanger may be bent (or may be light/way photo is taken).

    Anyway, no amount of derailleur adjustment will fix the issue. The chain must be sized correctly.

  20. #45
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    Wow. Someone hacked into Cx's account. In view of the situation, the reply was unbelievably kind.

    OP's shop built the bike and checked it two times. After at least three looks, the shop thought it was good. That is complete BS.

    No doubt at all that something is way wrong. The chain is clearly too long. The derailleur hanger may be bent (or may be light/way photo is taken).

    Anyway, no amount of derailleur adjustment will fix the issue. The chain must be sized correctly.
    I was in the midst of my first-cup-of-coffee bliss so not at full **shole level. You're right, it is pretty hard to believe that anyone working in the capacity of 'bicycle mechanic' wouldn't start off w/ putting the bike in small/small and checking chain length. I'd recommend 3 things...

    First, let the shop know that the person that built the bike, and the person that checked their work (hopefully this happened) are idiot slackers.

    Second, find another shop w/ competent mechanics.

    Third, learn how to figure these things out for yourself.
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  21. #46
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    Ahhhhh...back to normal. The universe unfolds as it should....

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  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I was in the midst of my first-cup-of-coffee bliss so not at full **shole level.
    Whew! For a moment I was worried.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  23. #48
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    Ok, my mistake here is having faith in 'professional' bike shops. I gave up on them about 15 years ago due to things like this (disk brake bleed cap not tightened, popped off first time I used the front brake; mechanic re-trued a 6 week old front wheel that had pringled on a new MTB whilst on the bike, then when I went to pick up he pointed out he hadn't removed the wheel as the hub bolt on lefty fork had seized and didn't think I'd mind never being able to remove it, etc). So spent the last 15 years doing my own wheel building, bike building (5 complete bikes). However, since last buying / building I'm moved to NZ where parts are not easily accessible, ditto tools, and support is kinda random too. So economically I had no sensible choice but to go for a full bike. I should have had alarm bells when they told me the quarq wouldn't fit and I had to email them the video and install instructions so that they believed me and the distributor....
    I did take it back in and say that I felt the chain was long, but was told explicitly it was right. Now I've never had a long cage mech before, always had short cage 53/39 12-25s. So combined with the move to hydro disks on a road bike (I've been running cabled Avids on my commute since 2005) then I accept that I'm not up with the latest kit, and that was why despite suspecting it was too long, I posted on here to confirm. Again, on the basis the mechanic had explicitly said it was right.
    So for warranty reasons I'm tied to the shop (already had a powermeter swapped) and they were sniffy when I fitted a chain catcher. However, there is a separate shop I'll be using for mechanic work in the future. Although after doing $250 of servicing on my MTB then they found a crack in the frame. Wish they'd found those before the service.
    To be 'fair' then the shop that retails Cannondale in my city is really more focussed on sub NZ$1000 bikes, e-bikes and kids bikes. So they will be as unfamiliar with this kit as I am. I bought cheap (for NZ), and so I can't expect the best service either. If this seems unusually charitable it's because that's just part of the mix of living here. You don't get to cherry pick all the best bits of all the places to live in the world.

    So thanks to all. Problem solved.

  24. #49
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    That's why I asked how many links.

  25. #50
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    adj the chain lenght.
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    chain is still too long.
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    no, it's not.
    woops

    for the WIN~!

    oh yea....
    Post #4 again
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Take it to another shop.
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