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  1. #26
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    Yes, a momentary loss of resistance wherein my foot kind of clunks the pedal forward, sort of like when you do 1 legged cadence drills with your non-dominant foot, but this is during low resistance.
    Thanks, it's clearer now. What probably happens is that your leg speed slows down briefly, allowing the top run of the chain to go slack. When that happens, you step into thin air until the chain is tight again (sometimes you hear a clunk when the chain snaps tight).

    Many people do this when they're tired and turn a cadence a bit too high. The nerves that coordinate the pedal stroke don't work as well as they should when the body is tired. You may want to ride with a slightly higher gear (at your customary speed), especially when fatigue sets in.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wim View Post
    Thanks, it's clearer now. What probably happens is that your leg speed slows down briefly, allowing the top run of the chain to go slack. When that happens, you step into thin air until the chain is tight again (sometimes you hear a clunk when the chain snaps tight).

    Many people do this when they're tired and turn a cadence a bit too high. The nerves that coordinate the pedal stroke don't work as well as they should when the body is tired. You may want to ride with a slightly higher gear (at your customary speed), especially when fatigue sets in.
    That's extremely fascinating and insightful! Thank you for that!

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    That's extremely fascinating and insightful! Thank you for that!
    As a further comment, this is indeed a neuromuscular issue much more than a crank length issue. You mentioned one-leg drills and I suggest you do more of those. You should also work specifically on increasing your cadence while keeping things smooth. This happens naturally for most people but nearly everyone can benefit from focused drills. Raise your cadence for a minute (or five minutes) and then drop back. Do this multiple times per ride. Focus on "pedaling circles" to keep things smooth and prevent your butt from bouncing on the saddle. All of this will help you a lot more than a change of a few mm in crank length.

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