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  1. #1
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    Di2 Rear mech adjustments

    Hi,

    Got a new bike with Dura ace Di2 9150 and for the most part very pleased with the electronic shifting.

    However when compared to my last bike which had Dura ace 9070 mechanical it's really noisy in certain ratios. I'm running a 52/36 with a 11-30 cassette.

    Weirdly the quietest ratio is 36 x 13/14, I'm thinking since the spring has the least amount of tension (?), as I move up the cassette it just starts getting louder. In 52 x 13 and above its noisy all the way through.

    As far as I know my options are to adjust the "b" screw to perhaps move the chain further away from the cassette and adjust the derailleur position using the shifters. The shimano manual says put the chain on sprocket 5 so its just making a noise before the next sprocket up and then dial it back 4 clicks.

    So....my question is does everyone follow this ? Does anyone dial it back in excess of 4 clicks ?

    And... if anyone else has any suggestions how I can quieten this thing down it would be appreciated.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    When I worked in a LBS while in college, I used to to put it in cog 5 and do micro adjustments until the "noise" was gone. I never had an issue with that process which is how my current Tarmac is setup.

    Hope this helps. If the noise does continue, make sure your hanger is straight and your wheel is centered in the dropouts.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, going to have a play tonight and see where I get.

  4. #4
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    First thing: check the hanger.
    I work for some bike racers
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    First thing: check the hanger.
    This!∆ ....but not by eyeball, with a hanger alignment tool.

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    It's not clear from your post what the problem is.

    Is it with larger rear cogs? (I assumed "up the cassette" meant larger cogs, not shifting up to harder gears.)

    Is the sound from the chain plates rubbing against the next cog? Or maybe just a noisy chain -- I use quite thick chain lube, which is noticeably quieter.

    ~~~

    To fine tune my bike:

    I shift up to the middle of the cassette to start.
    I'm looking for a slight gap between the side plate and the next larger cog. Sometimes I slip a dollar bill into the gap to verify it's not touching.

    I have the bike in a stand, and turn the crank very slowly. I watch as the rollers engage the cog teeth. I don't want to see any small lifting of the roller and plate, followed by a drop into the tooth base. It should be a smooth transition as the chain moves through.

    On my Di2, once it's adjusted in the middle cog, the rest of the cogs work perfectly. I, too, think a derailleur hanger tool check is a good idea.

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
    On my Di2, once it's adjusted in the middle cog, the rest of the cogs work perfectly. I, too, think a derailleur hanger tool check is a good idea.
    It should work in any cog on any drivetrain...not just Di2. Doesn't matter where you check adjustment, it should always be the same.
    I work for some bike racers
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  8. #8
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    Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

    Unfortunately I don't have access to a hanger tool, but swapped the hangar out anyway to see if there was a difference, unfortunately the noise levels were the same.

    The gears change smoothly across the whole range, and are pretty much as suggested above with regards to alignment. My issue is the noise. My bike with 9070 mechanical runs almost silent. The new 9150 is just really loud except 36 x 13,14. On chain ring 52 its pretty noisy all the way through the cassette.

    One thing I forgot to mention as I didn't think it was a factor until I did bit of research, is the derailleur jockey wheels are from ceramic speed and made of aluminium. They are the regular size, not the oversize ones.

    From what I have read these can be noisier than the standard nylon ones (or whatever they are made of). I will probably wait for a run in period to see if they quieten down and also try a thicker chain lube, maybe one of the wax based ones.

    Thanks

  9. #9
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Those pulleys are definitely noisier. I can't stand them. No benefit for lots of $$$. I hate wax lube as well. Use a thicker oil lube if you want, generally a 'wet' condition lube will work well, or a thick-ish mixture of home brew, or Chain L.
    I work for some bike racers
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  10. #10
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    One major difference between the 9070 and 9150 is the additional chain wrap present on the 9150 ‘shadow’ derailleur. I also switched swim 9070 to 9150 but with a 8050 GS RD. I do feel that it’s nosier but I don’t have a 9070 with me to compare. I have a derailleur hanger tool and I know my hanger is perfect. So I believe the source for the increased noise is from the RD but I can’t logically explain it except the chain wrap difference I mentioned earlier. Btw by swapping to a new hanger doesn’t mean the new hanger is straight. Every frame has a very small misalignment at the dropouts so every new hanger needs to be bent to offset the small misalignment at the dropouts. In other words a new frame + a new hanger doesn’t necessarily mean a straight hanger relative to the wheels. Nonetheless I doubt the issue is in the hanger since you didn’t mention any shifting issues.


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  11. #11
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    Good point on the potential frame drop out misalignment, it had crossed my mind, but without a check with a hangar tool and since the shifting is pretty much spot on your probably right the issue is elsewhere. I'm going with the theory of the metal jockey wheels as it makes sense.

    Although they add a nice bit of detailing, the additional noise is not worth any "perceived" benefit. Tbh, I can't tell any difference between them and normal wheels apart from the colour.

    If it doesn't settle in after a couple of weeks more usage I'll swap them out and report back.

    Thanks

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