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  1. #1
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    Dropout too tight

    The DS dropout of a frame which was shipped to me is too tight to fit a wheel into.
    It seems this happened during shipping -- there are pictures of the frame with wheels installed before shipping.
    Hence it seems the frame was dropped on the rear derailleur hanger which slightly "compressed" the dropout (the NDS is ok); unfortunately nothing was put into the dropouts to prevent that kind of damage.

    What's the best way to deal with this?
    Try to widen the dropout a bit by "bending" it (if so what would be an appropriate tool for that?)
    File off a bit of the metal?
    Something else?

  2. #2
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    We need more info:

    What bike/wheels are these?

    Is this new equipment or is it new/old stock?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  3. #3
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    The wheels (e.g., Campagnolo, Tune) I tried fit fine into other frames I have.
    I also checked the opening of both dropouts with a hex bit: it slides in fine on the NDS but not on the DS.
    The frame is used but as I wrote it had wheels mounted fine before shipping.

  4. #4
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    Why are you accepting it?

  5. #5
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    because I don't see a reasonable option to return it or get the money back from the shipping company -- there would probably be a long dispute between them and the seller about why the frame was damaged: bad handling versus insufficient packaging.

    It would be nice if someone can actually answer my question. TIA.

  6. #6
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    Well you're wrong about that if you used a credit card but you seemed determined to fix it yourself so.......take it to a frame builder and get a professional opinion.

  7. #7
    Huge in Japan
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    We don't know what the dropout is made from, how badly it's bent or your skill-set/resources. It may be possible to tunk it in with a wooden wedge (into the dropout slot the same way an axle would enter it, not perpendicular to the dropout). Maybe not, we don't have enough info.
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  8. #8
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Why don't you just post a photo so we can see exactly what need to be done. It could be as simple as ordering a new derailleur hanger. Or, if it's not replaceable then having a frame builder or *good* shop bending the dropout back. I've done it numerous times. At this point you haven't bothered to tell us what kind of frame you have so it's impossible to tell you how to fix it.
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  9. #9
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    It's a Time VXRS frame; AFAICT the dropout is made of metal (not carbon).
    The opening is about 0.1mm too tight, i.e., a very small amount.

    PS: I did not use a credit card for payment.

  10. #10
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Got Time View Post
    It's a Time VXRS frame; AFAICT the dropout is made of metal (not carbon).
    The opening is about 0.1mm too tight, i.e., a very small amount.

    PS: I did not use a credit card for payment.
    My photographic memory is not working today.

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  11. #11
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    I don't have a digital camera (sorry) so here's a part cropped from a picture of the frame.
    It probably doesn't help which is why I didn't post it before.
    http://www.meta1.org/download/dropout1.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #12
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    At this point, if you don't want to return the frame, I would suggest you take it to your friendly LBS, repent to them that you didn't buy it there and see what they can do for you.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=Got Time;5196644]I don't have a digital camera (sorry)

    Do you have a Google? Seriously - do a quick google image search of the frame/dropout that matches yours. Post/link that pic here.

  14. #14
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    From posts I've seen about "bubbling dropouts", I'd guess that the dropouts of this era were aluminum with a replaceable hanger screwed on from the inside.

    > Does the hub fit with the hanger removed?
    > How much difference is there between the right and left dropout. Not how tight, but how much difference?
    > Is the hanger straight up and down, or did it bend to the side when whatever bent it?

    Aluminum is does not like to be bent. It has been bent once, so bending it back involves the risk that it will crack on that second bend. If it is only a tiny bit, you might be okay bending it if it can be done with non-marring tools to prevent a stress riser during bending. I'm not sure whether it would be better to bend the dropout and hanger together or separately - you might have more control together, or it might be too difficult.

    The other way to go is to open up the dropout with a file. You would only file on the back tab of the dropout that is bent up - the hanger side. You don't want to effect wheel alignment by messing with the front part closer to the tubes. If you chose to file, a replacement hanger might not fit in the future because you haven't put the rear screw hole back in place. It really depends how much it is off. Removing .1 to .2mm of material is really not a big deal.

    That's my take on this after a fair amount of detective work - I could be wrong about all of it. Take off the hanger and see if the axle fits before you do anything else.

    Given what's at risk here, consider going to the best shop in the area, but they aren't going to pay for your frame if they snap the dropout trying to bend it.

    Also, give Time USA a call. They don't need to know how it got bent or if you're the original owner. Just call them up with your serial number and see what they say. There's a lifetime warranty, so they may want to fix it for you.
    Last edited by Kontact; 1 Week Ago at 11:09 AM.
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  15. #15
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    .1 mm to get it to clear is approximately .004 of an inch which is only a few swipes of a file on alloy. If whatever happened bent the dropout enough to cause interference then there may be other issues though.
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  16. #16
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    Unless you have tools to check dropout and hanger alignment yourself, you’re going to need a bike shop anyway, so take it in and have them check it out. If it was my aluminum hanger I would try a file to open it up a small amount, then check alignment.

  17. #17
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Take it to a shop.
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  18. #18
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  19. #19
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    Nice "assumption" and completely wrong.
    The frame was bought in Europe and paid by bank transfer.

  20. #20
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    Thanks for your detective work!!!
    I'm going with your suggestion to take the deraileur hanger off but one of the screws is stuck so I have to wait for the penetrating oil to hopefully loosen it.

    The hanger looks "straight up and down" but I ran into the problem with the dropout when I wanted to check its alignment (using a mounted wheel and the Park Tool derailleur hanger alignment gauge)

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Got Time View Post
    Thanks for your detective work!!!
    I'm going with your suggestion to take the deraileur hanger off but one of the screws is stuck so I have to wait for the penetrating oil to hopefully loosen it.

    The hanger looks "straight up and down" but I ran into the problem with the dropout when I wanted to check its alignment (using a mounted wheel and the Park Tool derailleur hanger alignment gauge)
    Let me guess - it is the back screw. It is probably stuck because the bend has the hanger wedged into its inset in the dropout.
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  22. #22
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    I may be late to the thread but I'll add my thoughts anyway.

    Regardless of what material the dropout is made of, since it's bonded to the stays, I wouldn't try bending the dropout open. I've successfully done it on steel frames but you run the risk of breaking the adhesive bond if you try on your Time frame.

    Take a file to it. I've done this as well and it's worked fine. Also, you can check around to see if there's a USA Time repair facility. They may contract with a carbon framebuilder to perform such repairs and you may be able to get a brand new dropout installed. I'd try filing it first.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    I may be late to the thread but I'll add my thoughts anyway.

    Regardless of what material the dropout is made of, since it's bonded to the stays, I wouldn't try bending the dropout open. I've successfully done it on steel frames but you run the risk of breaking the adhesive bond if you try on your Time frame.

    Take a file to it. I've done this as well and it's worked fine. Also, you can check around to see if there's a USA Time repair facility. They may contract with a carbon framebuilder to perform such repairs and you may be able to get a brand new dropout installed. I'd try filing it first.
    I'm also more in favor of a file. But I doubt the forces required to tweak the dropout back into shape are anywhere near the forces encountered while riding. That dropout bond should be good even after you jump off of a curb.

    That said, there are ways of expanding the dropout opening without using leverage on the stay.
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  24. #24
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    I took the hanger off after removing the previously stuck (front) screw and checked the dropout itself: it also was too tight, but by a smaller amount than the hanger.
    So I filed off a tiny bit from the dropout and a bit more from the hanger and was able to mount a wheel.
    Thanks to all of you who provided helpful answers, esp. about using a file and for taking the hanger off!

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