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  1. #1
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    Eccentric BB with two bolts...?

    Hi,

    I have a 2012 Furley that seems to have a creaky BB. I was going to try to tighten it up a little, and noticed it has two bolts in addition to the two pin holes for rotating the BB. I was expecting a wedge-type BB and as such only one bolt. Does anyone have any info on how a BB like this functions?

    Thanks in advance...

  2. #2
    breathe in,out; repeat
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    Sounds similar to my Haro Mary. Loosen the two bolts, then turn the BB shell to tighten/loosen the chain, then tighten the bolts back up.

    Nevermind. checked a few pics and those bolts are not the same as mine. Mine are external, on the underside of the BB shell. The pics I've seen show yours as being part of/inside the shell. Still might work out that they need to be loosened, then tightened, but not sure.

  3. #3
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    Please explain

    Quote Originally Posted by sszyszka View Post
    I have a 2012 Furley that seems to have a creaky BB. I was going to try to tighten it up a little, and noticed it has two bolts in addition to the two pin holes for rotating the BB. I was expecting a wedge-type BB and as such only one bolt. Does anyone have any info on how a BB like this functions?
    Are you saying that the BB shell is split and there are two bolts that serve to clamp it around the eccentric? If yes then that is a standard design for a tandem frame as the means to properly tension the timing (left side) chain. You just loosen both bolts and move the eccentric as needed. If you can't easily move the eccentric then you might need to insert something like a flat blade screwdriver in the BB shell slot to spread it a bit. Greasing the outside of the eccentric might be a good idea as well.

    Recognize that none of this may have anything to do with the creaks you hear. It could be the BB itself or any of a dozen other sources anywhere on the bike. The frame will transmit noise and people constantly report a noisy BB that was fixed by lubing and tightening the QR skewer on the front wheel.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys.

    Kerry,

    What parts of the skewer shoul be lubed? The threads? The shaft? Both? You might be on to something there...

  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    Full tutorial

    Quote Originally Posted by sszyszka View Post
    What parts of the skewer shoul be lubed? The threads? The shaft? Both? You might be on to something there...
    Here's the full tutorial.

    It is fairly common to have clicking noises, but ticks and clicks are very hard to eliminate sometimes. What seems like it is tied to the pedals may be coming from the seat post, etc. Sometimes things like temperature and humidity can affect noises as well. Also, things like the front derailleur cage just hitting the crank, loose bottle cage bolts, or the front derailleur cable sticking out and hitting your shoe can seem like they are clicks but really aren't. Another thing to consider is that the frame and components are flexing from pedaling forces, and so you can get a click or creak sound where you think it couldn’t be – for example the seat post & clamp can make noise even when you are standing and pedaling due the frame flexing. Here’s a link if you don’t like reading the rest of this post: Bicycle Touring Tips, Lessons Learned, and Tricks of the Trade

    Clicks tied to your pedaling can come from the BB (grease all threads in contact with the frame and BB, all metal to metal contact surfaces, and torque to the recommended settings, which can be quite high), the bolt holding the BB cable guide onto the frame (grease threads and make sure the bolt is not touching the BB shell inside the frame), crank bolts (grease threads and washers), the chain ring bolts (take them all out and grease the threads, the faces where they contact the CRs, and the CRs where they contact the crank spider arms), a stiff link in a chain or a burr on one of the "break off" special links used to assemble the chain, front derailleur clamp (clean and put a light film of grease on the inside of the clamp where it touches the seat tube), the pedals (grease the threads, get some wax etc. on the cleats, grease the bolts into your shoes, check for play in the bearings, squirt some lube into the guts of the pedal machinery if possible), the chain (clean and lube), shoes/cleats (loose cleat nut rattling around in the shoe sole, shoe/cleat interface), cleat bolts, cleats touching pedals (wax lube or furniture polish), seat post and saddle (grease the post, seat post bolts, saddle rails, and add some oil to where the rails go into the saddle body), bars and stem (grease the stem, stem bolts at both ends, h'bar bolt if quill stem, and h'bar where it goes through the stem, grease/tighten QRs and where the hub axle contacts the frame, tighten cassette lock ring, grease cassette hub body and cassette spacers, grease steerer tube spacers (if threadless), replaceable derailleur hangers (remove, clean, grease all parts and threads, reassemble), any other bolt (bottle cages, derailleur clamps, derailleur bolts, shift cable casing stops, etc.), cables hitting the frame (cable donuts), or shifting in their end ferrules (lube contact points).

    Clicks that happen when you coast can come from the computer wheel magnet hitting the pickup, the nuts on threaded Presta valve stems (throw the nut away), valve stems hitting/moving against the rim, reed switches in computer pickups, and your wheels (check for spoke tension, particularly on the rear non drive side, put a drop of lube where each pair of spokes cross and where each spoke enters the rim and the hub flange, check for loose metal bits or spoke nipples in the body of the rim and cracks in the rim at spoke holes.)

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all your help guys. Sorry For the extended silence.

    I cured the noises. I pulled the crank, cleaned out a bunch of grit, reinstalled and re-tightened everything and they disappeared. I have a feeling it was a crank arm that needed tightening coupled with a bunch of sand that had gotten into the grease. Either way, a fantastic learning experience.

    Thanks again!

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