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  1. #1
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    Enduro XD-15 Angular Ceramic BB-90 BB bearings- Where to buy?

    I see Cancellara had his Trek Madone fitted with the new angular Enduro XD-15 bottom bracket bearings for Paris-Roubaix last weekend. This is the first time that I've heard of a set availabl;e for a BB-90 bottom bracket. I was wondering if anyone knew where to get a set of these sweet bearings.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
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    They probably aren't avail to the public yet. Doing a GOOGLE search, only the XD-15 external BB systems are avail.

    And I still think ceramics are a waste of money.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  3. #3
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    I'm curious about the angular contact bearings more than ceramic since I've been using the SS Enduro bearings for a while now. I like my trek Madone but really could live without BB90.

  4. #4
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    Enduro XD-15

    When the do become availiable, you will be able to get them at Superfly Cycles. (www.superflycycles.com) Regardless of previous posts, ceramics really do make a difference. I have them on all my wheels, BBs and pulleys. They are not that expensive and last a lot longer, especially the BB. I've got the regular Enduro on my BB90 Trek Madone and love them. Not expensive at all.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerekE
    When the do become availiable, you will be able to get them at Superfly Cycles. (www.superflycycles.com) Regardless of previous posts, ceramics really do make a difference. I have them on all my wheels, BBs and pulleys. They are not that expensive and last a lot longer, especially the BB. I've got the regular Enduro on my BB90 Trek Madone and love them. Not expensive at all.

    Any benefit perceived from installing ceramics on a bicycle is merely a placebo effect. Only very sensitive equipment can detect an improvement when going from a high quality steel bearing like an ABEC 5 to a ceramic bearing. A bicycle has a minimal amount of drag from its components to begin with. Any drag felt by the rider is due to a rubber seal, not from a bearing.

    There are benefits to going with ceramics, but its the actual application to as where those benefits will show. If you were using them in high temp/high rpm/high load application like a turbocharger/supercharger for a car/truck then yes, there will be a difference. But unless you can spin your cranks to above 10,000 RPM's, then going with ceramics is actually a waste of money.

    Also ceramics have a benefit when insulating electric motors from other components because they can't conduct electricity.

    Just do a search and you will see the only people pushing ceramics, are those who sell ceramics.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  6. #6
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    Belief systems

    Quote Originally Posted by DerekE
    Regardless of previous posts, ceramics really do make a difference. I have them on all my wheels, BBs and pulleys. They are not that expensive and last a lot longer, especially the BB. I've got the regular Enduro on my BB90 Trek Madone and love them. Not expensive at all.
    OK, my current BB (steel bearings) has over 65,000 miles on it. I have put 90,000 miles on a steel bearing BB. My pedals (steel bearings) have over 120,000 miles. My hubs (steel bearings) have over 65,000 miles. Are you saying that ceramics last longer?

    And when you say "really make a difference" what do you mean? They don't roll any better unless they have better tolerances, lower friction seals, and/or better races than steel bearings, but then you would be comparing tolerances and seals, not bearings, so that argument holds no water.

    What else you got?

  7. #7
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    You must be correct. Obviously all the pros that use ceramics are just doing so because they are selling something right? Those pros are all just corporate shills. Although it is a bit curious that some use ceramic despite not being sponsored by the bearing manufacturer. Sastre and Contador must just not have the benefit of your expertise. Neither is sponsored by Enduro, but both use them.

    I do find it kind of interesting that most manufacturers are including ceramics to decrease wear and reduce the effects of corrosion, but again FSA and Shimano must not have the benefit of your superior steel bearing technology with the miles you reported. You must weigh 9 lbs, never get out of the saddle, and ride only in the sunshine without rain or snow to get 65,000 miles out of them. Either that or you are so cheap that you canít afford the $30 bucks for a new Dura Ace or (gasp!) $90 for a ceramic BB.

    Most cyclists will have to replace the stock Shimano BBs every 1,000 miles or less. Replacing it with a good quality ceramic usually solves the wear issues. With respect to "really makes a difference", that is definitely more subjective. I actually find the most difference when not under load and descending. I do agree with you that the seals (and for that matter, the grease) also make a difference. Are ceramics necessary? Absolutely not. It's simply a matter of durability for me and wanting to have the best equipment available. I like bling and am willing to pay for it. Anyone that reports they have 120,000 miles on their pedals must understand that.

    On a side note, I am quite interested in how you manage to get so many miles in. Based on some quick math, assuming you average 20 mph and ride 8 hours a day, you rode 750 days to get these miles in. Did I misread your figures?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerekE
    You must be correct. Obviously all the pros that use ceramics are just doing so because they are selling something right? Those pros are all just corporate shills. Although it is a bit curious that some use ceramic despite not being sponsored by the bearing manufacturer. Sastre and Contador must just not have the benefit of your expertise. Neither is sponsored by Enduro, but both use them.

    I do find it kind of interesting that most manufacturers are including ceramics to decrease wear and reduce the effects of corrosion, but again FSA and Shimano must not have the benefit of your superior steel bearing technology with the miles you reported. You must weigh 9 lbs, never get out of the saddle, and ride only in the sunshine without rain or snow to get 65,000 miles out of them. Either that or you are so cheap that you canít afford the $30 bucks for a new Dura Ace or (gasp!) $90 for a ceramic BB.

    Most cyclists will have to replace the stock Shimano BBs every 1,000 miles or less. Replacing it with a good quality ceramic usually solves the wear issues. With respect to "really makes a difference", that is definitely more subjective. I actually find the most difference when not under load and descending. I do agree with you that the seals (and for that matter, the grease) also make a difference. Are ceramics necessary? Absolutely not. It's simply a matter of durability for me and wanting to have the best equipment available. I like bling and am willing to pay for it. Anyone that reports they have 120,000 miles on their pedals must understand that.

    On a side note, I am quite interested in how you manage to get so many miles in. Based on some quick math, assuming you average 20 mph and ride 8 hours a day, you rode 750 days to get these miles in. Did I misread your figures?
    Don't assume that the average pro is an engineering genius and can weigh up the pros and cons of different technical options. Someone tells them that ceramics are great and they use them. And why not? They don't have to pay for them, nor maintain them. I'd go for every new thing too if I was in their position.

    If you are only getting 1000 miles out of a BB then you are doing something wrong.

  9. #9
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    Interested

    Quote Originally Posted by DerekE
    You must be correct. Obviously all the pros that use ceramics are just doing so because they are selling something right? Those pros are all just corporate shills. Although it is a bit curious that some use ceramic despite not being sponsored by the bearing manufacturer. Sastre and Contador must just not have the benefit of your expertise. Neither is sponsored by Enduro, but both use them.

    I do find it kind of interesting that most manufacturers are including ceramics to decrease wear and reduce the effects of corrosion, but again FSA and Shimano must not have the benefit of your superior steel bearing technology with the miles you reported. You must weigh 9 lbs, never get out of the saddle, and ride only in the sunshine without rain or snow to get 65,000 miles out of them. Either that or you are so cheap that you can’t afford the $30 bucks for a new Dura Ace or (gasp!) $90 for a ceramic BB.

    Most cyclists will have to replace the stock Shimano BBs every 1,000 miles or less. Replacing it with a good quality ceramic usually solves the wear issues. With respect to "really makes a difference", that is definitely more subjective. I actually find the most difference when not under load and descending. I do agree with you that the seals (and for that matter, the grease) also make a difference. Are ceramics necessary? Absolutely not. It's simply a matter of durability for me and wanting to have the best equipment available. I like bling and am willing to pay for it. Anyone that reports they have 120,000 miles on their pedals must understand that.

    On a side note, I am quite interested in how you manage to get so many miles in. Based on some quick math, assuming you average 20 mph and ride 8 hours a day, you rode 750 days to get these miles in. Did I misread your figures?
    As is always said, pros use what they're given, and all of the manufacturers have an incentive to 1) get their highest price stuff in front of the public and 2) "innovate" even when it's not innovative. Pros also don't shave on the day of a time trial on the belief that it "wastes nervous energy" or some such nonsense. The number of things that pros do and have believed that were simply false is the reason that teams like SaxoBank, Sky, Garmin, etc. feel they can make a difference by bringing science to the table.

    Can't speak for FSA or Shimano. I ride Campy.

    NOBODY I know replaces BBs "every 1,000 miles or less." I would say that 10,000 miles would be the minimum for a quality part that was properly installed, and I know people go a lot farther than that. I think your credibility just took a hit on that one.

    I ride about 10K miles per year, and my Campy ProFit pedals are entering their 13th season. I did replace a Campy BB at 60K miles (6 seasons), but that was because I over-torqued it and cracked the flange on the fixed cup. The bearings were just fine.

  10. #10
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    I work in a LBS, that sells over 1300 bikes per year. 1/3 of those bikes - so lets say 400 road bikes, and I will guess that around 98% of those are using either non-ceramic FSA or Shimano external BB's.

    I have been the lead mechanic there for 3 years now, and have used the FSA BB for 2 years personally on my other MTB. I have not seen a Shimano or an FSA BB go yet with under a 1,000 miles. My FSA BB still has clean grease inside after 2 years of duty without being serviced.

    I've seen more problems in the past year with BB30 stuff than I have seen with external non-ceramic bearings.

    Your hole in your bucket just got a little bigger.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerekE
    You must be correct. Obviously all the pros that use ceramics are just doing so because they are selling something right? Those pros are all just corporate shills.
    Yes, exactly! Not only that, but they're PAID to ride that gear. Its their job. They dont plaster themselves in 57 different brands because they think its awesome. Thats a paycheck coming out of each one.

    If the pros rode all the mid level junk, how would anyone justify selling their highline? You bought the sales pitch, afterall ;)

    I replaced a trashed, crunchy, gritty FSA bottom bracket with a brand new smooth ultegra. On the road I really dont notice any difference. Theres not enough down there to make a difference. 100rpm is nothing.

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