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  1. #1
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    Flite Classic Leveling

    If anyone, like me, is still riding a classic Ti Flite saddle, I wonder what you consider level. Do you put your spirit level completely nose of saddle to back, or do you recognize the slight up ramp of the back third of the saddle and only put the spirit level on the front half of the saddle?

    Although I have ridden Flite Classic Ti since they were introduced and have always leveled them along their entire length, a Fiziks GCN video where they leveled their 3 different saddle shapes differently got me to thinking that I may have been doing this wrong all along.

  2. #2
    Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico
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    If itís working for you, itís not wrong.
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  3. #3
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    Been riding the Flite for years. I level across the entire saddle, nose to tail with a 2 foot level.

  4. #4
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Who cares what others do? If it's been working for that long why on earth would you change it because of what some guy on a cycling site did?
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  5. #5
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    If you think that you need to change your saddle position, that has been unquestionable for however many years, because you saw a video you may want to shut off your computer for awhile.
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #6
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    While I am respectful of all your replies, let me head off the "if it's not broke don't fix it crowd" and say that while I raced for many years with Flites on two bicycles leveled in the same manner it is now, I have recently also been riding a bicycle with a Shimano Pro Falcon Ti Flow saddle that is a relatively flat saddle and very much different from a classic Flite Ti. So now when I get back on the Flite it feels as though there is a slightly annoying uprise toward the nose and if you look at the saddle from the side, there is.

    So that's why I posed the original question to Flite users. Just because it has always worked for me does not mean there is not an even better way to use it. My thought process was not based solely on the Fiziks YouTube video, but I thought they made a lot of good point as to how to employ their 3 different types of saddle shapes and some of what the demonstrated I though I could relate to my Flite Ti and my Pro Falcon Ti Flow.

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    While I am respectful of all your replies, let me head off the "if it's not broke don't fix it crowd" and say that while I raced for many years with Flites on two bicycles leveled in the same manner it is now, I have recently also been riding a bicycle with a Shimano Pro Falcon Ti Flow saddle that is a relatively flat saddle and very much different from a classic Flite Ti. So now when I get back on the Flite it feels as though there is a slightly annoying uprise toward the nose and if you look at the saddle from the side, there is.

    So that's why I posed the original question to Flite users. Just because it has always worked for me does not mean there is not an even better way to use it. My thought process was not based solely on the Fiziks YouTube video, but I thought they made a lot of good point as to how to employ their 3 different types of saddle shapes and some of what the demonstrated I though I could relate to my Flite Ti and my Pro Falcon Ti Flow.
    So bring the nose down a bit. How much? Who knows...mess with and see. No one here can give you any advice that will really help.
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  8. #8
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    Good lord! Another element of cycling to fill the time of those with OCD! In 50+ years of cycling, I have NEVER worried about how "level" my saddle was (or gone to the extreme of using a carpenter's level..). I just bought myself a new Brooks Team Professional saddle for my gravel bike, and did with it what I've always done for a new saddle; put the thing on, put the saddle about where I think it should be, then took a short ride with my 3-way hex wrench in my pocket, and stopped 3 or 4 times to get it to the most comfortable position.

    How can people obsess over such minutiae?
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  9. #9
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    if a saddle looks level to my eye, it's usually fine for my butt.

    have used a bubble level a few times, but the eyeball test seems to works best for me.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    if a saddle looks level to my eye, it's usually fine for my butt.

    have used a bubble level a few times, but the eyeball test seems to works best for me.
    The ass test works, as Toulouse said, best for me.
    Too old to ride plastic

  11. #11
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    Thanks all for blowing this way out of proportion. All I was looking for were other Flite Ti users who may level based on the front 1/2 of the saddle with the ramp up in the back. This rather than just running the saddle with a spirit level nose to heel.

    So my guess is that some of the negativity comes from some riders who have never even used a Flite. This was not a "generic saddle" question. Go figure.

  12. #12
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    I level front to back on my old flite....The only other thing I'm picky about is handlebar reach.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  13. #13
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Thanks all for blowing this way out of proportion. All I was looking for were other Flite Ti users who may level based on the front 1/2 of the saddle with the ramp up in the back. This rather than just running the saddle with a spirit level nose to heel.

    So my guess is that some of the negativity comes from some riders who have never even used a Flite. This was not a "generic saddle" question. Go figure.
    I rode Flites for years, pretty much everyone did back in the 90's. It still doesn't matter what any of us did, you have to position you saddle for you. There are tons of saddles that have a tail that swoops up...it doesn't matter. No one is blowing anything out of proportion. Your question isn't at all like something that has a concrete 'correct' answer, it's very subjective.

    The negativity comes from the fact that you're still pushing for an answer when you've been told repeatedly there isn't one.
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  14. #14
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    I dony know anything about that particular saddle and I have never ridden a "level" saddle (I'm 4 degrees nose down measured at the widest point), I do have a method for transferring a saddle angle from one bike to another.

    I use a smartphone app called "bubble level". I start the app and place the phone across the saddle at it's widest point and note the number.

    This works really well if you have a bike with a saddle that works for you. You can also use it to make measured incremental changes as you try different settings.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Just because it has always worked for me does not mean there is not an even better way to use it.

    That's true. And what some stranger on the internet does with a level in their basement has nothing to do with finding that better way for you.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Thanks all for blowing this way out of proportion. All I was looking for were other Flite Ti users who may level based on the front 1/2 of the saddle with the ramp up in the back. This rather than just running the saddle with a spirit level nose to heel.

    So my guess is that some of the negativity comes from some riders who have never even used a Flite. This was not a "generic saddle" question. Go figure.
    The answer is still the same. The only "right" leveling is the one that works for you. IME the typical range for "appropriate level" goes from "nose level" (extending a line from the front part of the saddle would be level with the ground) to "nose/butt level" where the nose is raised to the point where it is even with the butt. What works for any individual is all that counts. I was a "nose level" guy when I rode Flites, but several folks I rode with were "butt level" types, and of course everything in between.

  17. #17
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    I dony know anything about that particular saddle and I have never ridden a "level" saddle (I'm 4 degrees nose down measured at the widest point), I do have a method for transferring a saddle angle from one bike to another.

    I use a smartphone app called "bubble level". I start the app and place the phone across the saddle at it's widest point and note the number.

    This works really well if you have a bike with a saddle that works for you. You can also use it to make measured incremental changes as you try different settings.
    I use the 'Clinometer' app and a clipboard. Works great...but it still doesn't and can't answer the OP's question.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I rode Flites for years, pretty much everyone did back in the 90's. It still doesn't matter what any of us did, you have to position you saddle for you. There are tons of saddles that have a tail that swoops up...it doesn't matter. No one is blowing anything out of proportion. Your question isn't at all like something that has a concrete 'correct' answer, it's very subjective.

    The negativity comes from the fact that you're still pushing for an answer when you've been told repeatedly there isn't one.
    Didn't the Flite start out as the Concor Flite saddle back in the early 80s? Most of the racers I knew in those days rode that saddle, but some of us preferred the Selle Italia (Bernard Hinault) Turbo saddle.

    Interestingly, a discussion by Fi'zik about saddle types answered the question to me about those two earlier saddles: Fi'zik pointed out that lower RPM "mashers" will do better on a saddle whose lateral profile is more rounded (Flite) while higher RPM "spinners" do better with a saddle whose lateral profile is flatter (Turbo). Funny, because Hinault was more of a masher, but his saddle worked quite well for me for over twenty years.
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  19. #19
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    Didn't the Flite start out as the Concor Flite saddle back in the early 80s? Most of the racers I knew in those days rode that saddle, but some of us preferred the Selle Italia (Bernard Hinault) Turbo saddle.

    Interestingly, a discussion by Fi'zik about saddle types answered the question to me about those two earlier saddles: Fi'zik pointed out that lower RPM "mashers" will do better on a saddle whose lateral profile is more rounded (Flite) while higher RPM "spinners" do better with a saddle whose lateral profile is flatter (Turbo). Funny, because Hinault was more of a masher, but his saddle worked quite well for me for over twenty years.
    Selle Italia Flite. Came out in '91. The first 'lightweight' saddle available.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Lauridsen View Post
    Been riding the Flite for years. I level across the entire saddle, nose to tail with a 2 foot level.
    That's exactly what I do too. I've been riding a Flite since the early 1990's when they first came out. It's great that Selle Italia still makes the classic 1990's Flite.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Thanks all for blowing this way out of proportion. All I was looking for were other Flite Ti users who may level based on the front 1/2 of the saddle with the ramp up in the back. This rather than just running the saddle with a spirit level nose to heel.

    So my guess is that some of the negativity comes from some riders who have never even used a Flite. This was not a "generic saddle" question. Go figure.
    So an actual response to your question... I use a level full nose-to-tail (actually the iPad ďSurfaceĒ app these days) and angle it down just under 2 degrees. On my spirit level, this is the point where the bubble just touches the line (experience from using this saddle since it came out too).

    TBH, about a year ago, I finally switched to a Selle Italia Kit Carbonio Flow saddle and like it just as well for a whole lot less weight, but Iíve found I can ride a wide variety of saddles with reasonable comfort, too, so might not work for you.


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