Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28

    Help getting a crank apart

    I have a Chinese carbon frame, I'd say between 5-10 years old. I bought it used with the crankset in the pictures already in it. Bearings developed a click that is driving me nuts, so I decided to pull the crank apart to either clean and repack or replace them.

    Got the non drive side arm off, and got this very thin threaded aluminum ring out.



    I can't get the drive side crank arm off of the other side. Assuming I need a special puller but was hoping I could make a tool if needed.



    I tried hitting the non drive side of the crank axle to knock the hole thing through and just leave the drive side crank arm attached, but it won't budge. I don't want to hit to hard. I was using a piece of wood to try to protect it. If it won't go through that way does it mean it will only go through the other direction (after the drive side crank arm is removed?)

    I need to know how to get this apart - maybe a YouTube vid on disassembly and reassembly, and possibly a link towards the correct bearings or whatever I need to get it back going.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,252
    How on earth did you get the NDS crank arm off? You need a puller and also something to fill up the oversize hole in the crank axle. The tools are in the photo below. If you got the NDS crank arm off w/o the proper tools it's probably ruined. There is another cup on the DS that is also threaded into your frame which is why you can't hammer it off. It's left hand threads.

    ETA: Your front derailleur is too high.
    ETA2: After more thought you should probably take your bike to a shop before you do serious damage to it.

    Last edited by cxwrench; 1 Week Ago at 03:26 PM.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #3
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26,504
    In addition to cxwrench's words of wrenching wisdom... All this started because of a click? Be warned, most "clicks" attributed to bottom bracket bearings are not coming from the bottom bracket bearings at all.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  4. #4
    Russian Troll Farmer
    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    1,735
    Love those pedals, too......probably rides in sneakers and gym shorts...
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    That makes perfect sense that there is another cup on the other side, and that's why it won't go through. Duh. Lol

    The NDS has always had an issue with fit, and I have to keep an eye on the screw that goes into the crank axle that holds the arm on. The splines are not quite right from working loose and I have had to file the crank arm a few times to get it to seat. Since it is not quite right it tends to work loose over time, usually every 100 miles or so. I just keep an eye on the bolt and tighten before every ride if needed. The crankset could use replacing, so I'll probably do that. No problem there. When I removed it, it was as simple as removing the center bolt and then wiggling the crank arm with a little force.

    The click is definitely coming from the bearings. With the chain off and no load on the pedals, it clicks every time around when the pedals are turned. It is worse with a load on the pedals, ie, me pedaling.

    As far as the derailleur, I didn't know it is too high. I did put it there. This whole bike is kind of pieced together. I have never had an issue with it and it shifts Ok...should I leave it or bring it down?

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    I have a right leg injury and my ankle is fused solid at 90 degrees.. Riding clipped in isn't an option. I've tried it.

    I actually wear cycling shorts. I also ride about 100 miles a month on road and about 30 a month on mountain.

    Just trying to keep my bike going, but thanks for the input. That's the reason I am asking here, so I can do it right.

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,252
    That all makes sense. You could probably find a replacement left arm somewhere w/o too much trouble then it would stay tight. I'd lower the derailleur to within about 2mm of the top of the tallest chainring teeth.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    Ok, I will definitely do that. The only issue I have had with it is that it is a little sticky. When I shift it up to the tallest chainring, it doesn't want to come back down (spring assist) to the smaller ones. I usually have to shift it with the lever and then tap it with my shoe to make it go inwards. I have been meaning to pull it off and clean it up good and relube it to hopefully fix that, just haven't had a chance. Now is a good time to do it. I usually just keep it in the big ring anyway, so it hasn't been a pressing issue.

  9. #9
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,252
    Quote Originally Posted by cncwhiz View Post
    Ok, I will definitely do that. The only issue I have had with it is that it is a little sticky. When I shift it up to the tallest chainring, it doesn't want to come back down (spring assist) to the smaller ones. I usually have to shift it with the lever and then tap it with my shoe to make it go inwards. I have been meaning to pull it off and clean it up good and relube it to hopefully fix that, just haven't had a chance. Now is a good time to do it. I usually just keep it in the big ring anyway, so it hasn't been a pressing issue.
    Undo the cable at the derailleur and see if that's really where the problem lies. It might also be lots of friction in the cable/housing. If the derailleur moves fine you know it's the cable/housing. Replace both. If the derailleur doesn't move well w/ the cable undone you know it's actually the derailleur. Clean it really well and put some oil on the pivots.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  10. #10
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,585
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    There is another cup on the DS that is also threaded into your frame which is why you can't hammer it off. It's left hand threads.
    If it doesn't come off with a hammer, you're using too small of a hammer Anything comes off with the right hammer.



    Quote Originally Posted by cncwhiz View Post
    Ok, I will definitely do that. The only issue I have had with it is that it is a little sticky. When I shift it up to the tallest chainring, it doesn't want to come back down (spring assist) to the smaller ones. I usually have to shift it with the lever and then tap it with my shoe to make it go inwards. I have been meaning to pull it off and clean it up good and relube it to hopefully fix that, just haven't had a chance.
    See the (cable guide) little tube that the cable goes through around your bottom bracket? Take the cable out and clean the tube out real good. It's probably really gunked up inside and causing cable drag.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,569
    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Love those pedals, too......probably rides in sneakers and gym shorts...
    Trolling again? If you're not going to help the OP, you shouldn't reply. Many riders use platform pedals and not just recreational riders.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    Got the puller in and got the drive side arm off. Then was able to get the bottom bracket assembly out.





    So it is an ISIS splined shaft, but not sure on length. Based on the sticker I am thinking 108mm? Also assuming a typical 68mm setup.

    Just going to get a new one, but I am not sure what to buy exactly.

  13. #13
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26,504
    Quote Originally Posted by cncwhiz View Post
    Got the puller in and got the drive side arm off. Then was able to get the bottom bracket assembly out.





    So it is an ISIS splined shaft, but not sure on length. Based on the sticker I am thinking 108mm? Also assuming a typical 68mm setup.

    Just going to get a new one, but I am not sure what to buy exactly.
    Before spending money on a new one...are the bearings still good? Do they still spin freely? Cartridge units can last a long time through a ton of muck.

    First I'd try cleaning the cups and unit and reinstalling with proper preparation, And to torque-spec.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    It feels pretty solid. I guess I could clean the unit pretty well and try reinstalling. I just dont like the fact that it is sealed and I cant get to those bearings to clean and repack them.

    There is no play like there would be in a worn out bearing, but I'm just not sure what is causing the click I'm hearing and it is not something I want to continue to hear.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,569
    Bottom brackets are fairly cheap. Unless you are living from paycheck to paycheck, I would just replace it while you have the whole thing apart. Do you have a caliper ruler to measure it?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #16
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,585
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Bottom brackets are fairly cheap. Unless you are living from paycheck to paycheck, I would just replace it while you have the whole thing apart. Do you have a caliper ruler to measure it?
    Shouldn't need a caliper. They come in 4 lengths. 108mm(4.25"), 113mm(4.45"), 118mm(4.65") & 128mm(5.04")
    A ruler would be able to determine which one.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    28
    I can measure, but curious what points I would pull from. Outside of axle to outside of axle or outside of bearing housing edge to bearing housing edge?

  18. #18
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,585
    Quote Originally Posted by cncwhiz View Post
    I can measure, but curious what points I would pull from. Outside of axle to outside of axle or outside of bearing housing edge to bearing housing edge?
    See page #15
    https://www.isisdrive.com/isisdrive/...ument_revD.pdf
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  19. #19
    Matnlely Dregaend
    Reputation: DrSmile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,709
    ISIS bottom brackets have notoriously undersized bearings because of the large spindle in a standard BB shell. There is a reason it is obsolete. I think the best one available is SKF which runs the bearings directly on the spindle, but it probably costs more than your whole crank.
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” - Susan B. Anthony 1896
    "Cycling and ethical bankruptcy have always gone together." - Bike Snob NYC
    "White personifies this generation's obsession with superficiality, one in which a carefully curated social media post is more important than the actual ride" - Daimeon Shanks
    "I haven't %^&* like that since I was an altar boy" Hank Moody

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    105
    Agree on SKF BB for ISIS. Have a mtn tanndem w ISIS and had BB issues until installing SKF. No troubles ever since. Interesting design, quality materials and kind of expensive but they have overcome the ISIS design challenges.
    Highly reccomend them.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by cncwhiz View Post
    I can measure, but curious what points I would pull from. Outside of axle to outside of axle or outside of bearing housing edge to bearing housing edge?
    Measure the overall length of the BB spindle (what you call axle). Seeing as how it looks like you are using a road double, I'm guessing you will find you have a 108mm.

    If cleaning and re-greasing the BB bearings (and making sure the BB cups and crank fixing bolts have all been torqued correctly), does not fix your clicking problem, then this might be the time to consider replacing the BB and cranks. At that point, you need not go with ISIS. The reason I mention this is that the ISIS interface on the NDS crank arm has probably been damaged from the crank arm coming loose multiple times. Even with a new ISIS BB, the NDS crank is likely to still keep coming loose, and could even be the source of your clicking.

Similar Threads

  1. contractions are 7 mins apart and getting stronger
    By gutfiddle in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: 05-14-2009, 07:45 PM
  2. Just took apart and rebuilt an 8 speed shifter
    By cthomas in forum Campagnolo
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-21-2006, 11:33 PM
  3. help pulling apart hubs
    By laotsu42 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-20-2005, 07:15 PM
  4. A great 38 miles..then it fell apart
    By PaulCL in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-30-2005, 03:41 PM
  5. We Will Never See Any One As Good As Lance ! (apart from me of course)
    By yr99jparkin in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-25-2004, 07:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.