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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hood position on flat top bars (Profile Dromo)

    Curious if anyone can help me out here.

    I have a Profile "Dromo" handlebar. I've struggled to get the bar setup right with this bar.

    Using the normal method (Align bottom of brake lever with a straightedge along the end of the drop) I can seem to only get either the hoods or the drops right, I'm having trouble getting both positions correct.

    The issue is when I set the hoods (SRAM) in the standard position, and then rotate the bar to make the hoods comfortable (hood level or slightly up from level) I end up with the "ergo" portion of the drops fairly vertical. This causes me to have trouble reaching the brake lever when riding in the drops, makes it difficult to sprint in the drops because my forearm is almost hitting the bar, and it also rotates the "flat top" of the bar to the point where it's not so comfortable to use.

    I'm curious if anyone has come up with a good method of setting hood position with flat top bars to overcome these issues... (I hope the Profile bar is not just a bad bar)

    Thanks...

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    how it's done...

    The idea of setting the end of the brake lever even with the bottom of the drop is extremely outdated. Most of mine are at least an inch higher.

    I first adjust the angle or the anatomic hook section to be comfortable. Any bar that I use must also have very little "ramp down" from the top of the bar to the bend where the shift lever mounts. If the brake hood ends up 2cm below the top of the bars due to the rampdown, the bar is an immediate reject for me (Easton EA-70 for example).

    After the anatomic hook area is comfortable, I then mount the shift lever and adjust the portion of the brake hood where my palm rests to be horizontal at the minimum, or angle up a few degrees. I pay absolutely no attention to the location of the brake lever.

    With some bars, as the shift lever is moved up the curve to achieve the level brake hood, the brake lever may swing far away from the anatomic hook. If this happens (almost always with Campy ergo) then I have to make a small modification to the ergo lever body to bring the brake lever closer to the bar (I've got short fingers). Some bars require more adjustment than others. My Easton EC-90 bar don't require much, but the FSA K-Force compact bars I have require a lot. I think they'll be on E-bay soon.

    Here's an example of a bar I wouldn't consider. It's got 20 degrees of ramp down and a 100mm c-c reach, perhaps the longest on the market.

    http://www.syntace.com/index.cfm?pid=3&pk=1155
    Last edited by C-40; 11-08-2007 at 01:35 PM.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Thanks.. I noticed even though Profile doesn't have any instructions, FSA does, and they want the hoods mounted higher then the "old school" method.

    I'll have to see what I can find. I emailed Profile as well.. maybe they're surprise me and answer.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Nowadays the "proper". Position is based on a comfy transition from the bar tops to the hoods. Look at top end bikes these days and its usually a flat profile, from the bar to the very front of the hood. Just make sure you can reach the brifters when in drops.
    If u try this w/ old 64 or 66's, its really goofy, and adds a ton of reach to the hoods.

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