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  1. #1
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    How hard is it to install Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes

    I've built up frames before with both mechanical and Di2 components. I also do all my own wrenching. I've installed caliper brakes, but I've never had a bike with disc brakes. I'm thinking about building up a frame with Di2 and Hydro Disc brakes. How difficult is the installation of the disc brakes. If I watch a few videos and read the Dealer's Manual, is it pretty straightforward. Or is it a real beast, and I'll hate myself for taking on the task. In terms of hours and minutes, how long should the job take?

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Not that difficult. Watch some videos. Have all the tools. Measure twice. Cut straight - actually perpendicular.

    Time - depends. I took a long time b/c i had never done it before and didn't have extras of the brass fittings.

    I wouldn't start at 11 pm the night before a big ride.

  3. #3
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    crit_boy's reply is EXACTLY correct.

    I would only add: in addition to the extra "olive and barb" kit, you should also order one of those hydraulic bleed kits from amazon it will make your life easier.

    When I did hydro brakes for the first time it took me about 2 hours. I think it would take less than 30 minutes the next time I do it. It's not hard, and since you are using shimano, it's just mineral oil.

  4. #4
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    You need the Shimano bleed kit, and possibly the road lever adapter depending on the levers you're using. You need the Shimano hose cutter/barb installer cuz it's the best one I've seen. You need to follow the directions EXACTLY or you'll be spilling mineral oil and cursing up a storm. Do NOT attempt to bleed them w/ the pads installed, you'll most likely ruin them. DO use the Shimano orange piston setting shim to set the position of the pistons/pads...do NOT use the rotor.
    No...it's not hard but if you haven't done it before and don't do what you're supposed to do it won't work. Takes me about 20-30mins per brake. Just remember...it's your brakes you're messing with.
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  5. #5
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    So I guess the bigger question is... is an upgrade from 6870 with rim brakes to 8070 with disc brakes a big enough upgrade to be worth it?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiCoyote View Post
    So I guess the bigger question is... is an upgrade from 6870 with rim brakes to 8070 with disc brakes a big enough upgrade to be worth it?
    depends on how you are going to use the bike if it's worth it to YOU. Personally I wouldn't do it but I don't have anything I'm trying to solve for function either. I guess if I wanted to do some long steep technical descents that require lots of braking regularly I might.

    The only hard part can be bleeding the back from my experience. I don't follow the Shimano directions for bleeding anymore, easier to bleed from the bottom up IMHO.
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  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    depends on how you are going to use the bike if it's worth it to YOU. Personally I wouldn't do it but I don't have anything I'm trying to solve for function either. I guess if I wanted to do some long steep technical descents that require lots of braking regularly I might.

    The only hard part can be bleeding the back from my experience. I don't follow the Shimano directions for bleeding anymore, easier to bleed from the bottom up IMHO.
    Uhhhhmmm...those are the Shimano instructions...
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Uhhhhmmm...those are the Shimano instructions...
    perhaps they changed it - with the BR R785 Caliper the directions involved using a baggie to collect oil from the bleeder valve and pump it from the master cylinder / funnel until no bubbles. The tube in the baggie was supposed to have the end submerged in the fluid so it wouldn't draw air back into the system when you released the brake lever between strokes. Thats the instructions that came with my brakes anyway.
    Last edited by Srode; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:05 AM.
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  9. #9
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiCoyote View Post
    I've built up frames before with both mechanical and Di2 components. I also do all my own wrenching.
    If you've done all your own wrenching, then you definitely have the skills. It's not that hard. Just take your time and don't rush it. Some good advice here and watch some youtube videos. IMO installation and cutting the hoses is a breeze. Bleeding can be a bit tricky at first, just be methodical.

    Be very very very careful to keep everything clean and brake fluid away from your pads and rotors. Just one drop on them can cause incurable squealing. Wash your hands really well before touching the pads and rotors. Get in the habit of never touching the pad material or rotor brake surface... ever.

    Don't ever squeeze the brake lever without a rotor or spacer in the brake caliper. The pistons WILL pop out of the caliper. Fluid WILL pour everywhere.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    If you've done all your own wrenching, then you definitely have the skills. It's not that hard. Just take your time and don't rush it. Some good advice here and watch some youtube videos. IMO installation and cutting the hoses is a breeze. Bleeding can be a bit tricky at first, just be methodical.

    Be very very very careful to keep everything clean and brake fluid away from your pads and rotors. Just one drop on them can cause incurable squealing. Wash your hands really well before touching the pads and rotors. Get in the habit of never touching the pad material or rotor brake surface... ever.

    Don't ever squeeze the brake lever without a rotor or spacer in the brake caliper. The pistons WILL pop out of the caliper. Fluid WILL pour everywhere.
    Disc brakes. SOOOO much better/easier. SMDH


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  11. #11
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    A friend told me that discs add about 2lbs to the bike when you factor in rotors, brakes, lines, and frame mounts. He also told me that turning the bike upside down can cause the system to leak. Any similar experiences?

  12. #12
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiCoyote View Post
    A friend told me that discs add about 2lbs to the bike when you factor in rotors, brakes, lines, and frame mounts. He also told me that turning the bike upside down can cause the system to leak. Any similar experiences?
    Your 'friend' is completely ignorant of the truth concerning disc brakes. Completely. The difference between Ultegra disc and non-disc is about .5 lb for just the parts. The frame/fork do need disc mounts and some reinforcing but the total for the parts and the frame differences probably totals about a pound.
    How anyone that has ever worked w/ disc brakes at all could think they will leak if turned upside down is ridiculous. It's not like it's a cup of coffee.
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