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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Installing threadless fork for the first time....

    Well I finally got all the stuff together for the fork install, which is threadless. I just wanted to run the procedure by all you knowledgeable folks before I go and screw something up.

    So I should first intall the cups, and related items, including the fork crown race. Assemble the headset as if I'm going to intall, and slide the steerer into the headtube. Put on the stem, and mark the location on the steerer. At this point, I should cut the steer tube where I marked it as being the top of stem. Then once the extra is off, install the star nut, put it together, grease it up, and tighten the system.

    Does that sound about right? I just want to be sure on the height for cutting, as I'd rather not ruin a nice new fork.

    Thanks!
    Dan

  2. #2
    eminence grease
    Reputation: terry b's Avatar
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    Here's how I do it.

    1- Grease the bottom cup with anti-seize and install it.
    2- Repeat process for top cup
    3- Install the crown race
    4- Put the fork in the tube, install the remaining pieces of the headset.
    5- Put a couple of spacers on, then the stem (with the handlebar installed)
    6- Lighty tighten the stem bolts
    7- Put the front wheel on, take it out of the stand and measure the bar height (top of bar to ground)
    8- Back on the stand, off with the wheel. Adjust # of spacers based on Step 7
    9- Using a Sharpie, make a line at the top of the stem to mark baseline for cut
    10- Loosen the stem, take it off, sort of hand compress the whole stack and put the stem back on. Make sure the Sharpie line is still correct (measure twice, cut once)
    11- Wrap the fork with electrical tape 3-4mm below the Sharpie line.
    12- Put a hose clamp on the steerer at the top of the tape.
    13- Saw away
    14- Remove clamp and tape, soften edges with a half round file.
    15- Put it all back together, this time greasing the bearings and the crown race
    16- Install compressor plug, top cap and preload the stack.
    17- Front wheel back on, align the stem and torque the stem bolts to 7Nm
    18-Done


    You mentioned a star nut, so I assume you're not using a fork with a carbon steerer. If you're using a steel/alloy steerer, I'd pound the star nut in after Step 14 above. If you're using a carbon steerer - NO STAR NUT.

  3. #3
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
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    Dan, it sounds good but you need to cut the fork about 2-3mm below the top of the stem. You'll never get your headset tight if the fork steerer is level with the top of the stem. Having the fork 2-3mm below the stem top allows for headset tightening
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    spacers

    Quote Originally Posted by physics_nut
    Well I finally got all the stuff together for the fork install, which is threadless. I just wanted to run the procedure by all you knowledgeable folks before I go and screw something up.

    So I should first intall the cups, and related items, including the fork crown race. Assemble the headset as if I'm going to intall, and slide the steerer into the headtube. Put on the stem, and mark the location on the steerer. At this point, I should cut the steer tube where I marked it as being the top of stem. Then once the extra is off, install the star nut, put it together, grease it up, and tighten the system.

    Does that sound about right? I just want to be sure on the height for cutting, as I'd rather not ruin a nice new fork.

    Thanks!
    Dan
    Ya might want to consider some spacers under the stem,unless you know bar height will be right without em. Ya can take em out later, and recut the steerer, but can't put em in once the fork is measured and cut as you describle.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    when determining the place at which you want to cut your steerer you can, depending on your headset, remove the o-ring from the top bearing cap making it significantly easier to get the headset fully compressed for marking purposes. i've only done chris king headsets so i'm not sure how well it applies to others but this step helped me.

    good luck.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Be careful!

    Two things:

    - installing the race on the fork is non-trivial. The cheapest thing to do is buy a plumbing pipe that has an inner diameter that is larger than the steerer tube. Use this to slide down and compress evenly.

    - make sure you put some spacers on the steerer tube before you cut!!! The quickest way to ruin your bike is having it too short. Then you have to get a new fork or some seriously angled stem.

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