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  1. #1
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    Looking for a special bracket

    My mid-80's Cannondale has a bracket where the front derailleur mounts. It has a slot so that the derailleur can be adjusted up and down. Currently, I am running a 48T as my largest chainring, and the derailleur is at the bottom of the adjustment slot.

    Occasionally my local bike club has some VERY hilly rides, and I would like to put shorter rings for just those rides, but my derailleur won't adjust any lower. Is there (or was there) an alternate bracket that adjusts lower? The bracket has a radius that goes around the seat tube, so fabricating one in my basement would be rather challenging.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  2. #2
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    get a clamp ..

  3. #3
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    use a torque wrench

  4. #4
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    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #5
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    Sorry, I don't see how any of those first 2 will do what I need. A clamp derailleur will have interference from the bracket capture nuts on the seat tube, and the Wickwerks seems to allow zero adjustment, which would make the problem worse.

    I'm looking at the Sugino, although I wonder if it would allow the derailleur to pivot? Have you used it before?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Sorry, I don't see how any of those first 2 will do what I need. A clamp derailleur will have interference from the bracket capture nuts on the seat tube, and the Wickwerks seems to allow zero adjustment, which would make the problem worse.

    I'm looking at the Sugino, although I wonder if it would allow the derailleur to pivot? Have you used it before?
    No I haven't, but there is a picture of it in use in this link.

    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...ob/1EthgI5YknE
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Sorry, I don't see how any of those first 2 will do what I need. A clamp derailleur will have interference from the bracket capture nuts on the seat tube, and the Wickwerks seems to allow zero adjustment, which would make the problem worse.

    I'm looking at the Sugino, although I wonder if it would allow the derailleur to pivot? Have you used it before?
    I'm guessing you didn't watch the video?

    There's lots of adjustment. It's exactly what you need. I've installed a dozen or so of them without issue.

    You can set it high or low, you can use one or two of the upper bolts. You can pivot the mech just like you could before.

    click this: https://youtu.be/brho23tOcqc?t=3m4s
    use a torque wrench

  8. #8
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    I must be missing something here.

    OP's big ring is 48T and he wants a smaller one. Maybe OP could just shift into the small ring.

    I don't see the point: Riding in the little ring vs buying/fabricating some weird add on derailleur hanger, buying a new chain ring, switching everything, adjusting, riding a ride, then switching everything back, adjusting, etc.

    Use your small ring and/or get a cassette with bigger cogs. No need to over think/over spend it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    I must be missing something here.

    OP's big ring is 48T and he wants a smaller one. Maybe OP could just shift into the small ring.

    I don't see the point: Riding in the little ring vs buying/fabricating some weird add on derailleur hanger, buying a new chain ring, switching everything, adjusting, riding a ride, then switching everything back, adjusting, etc.

    Use your small ring and/or get a cassette with bigger cogs. No need to over think/over spend it.
    I'm running half-step gearing, so my "little" ring is currently a 45. Since it's a road bike with a short reach derailleur, there is a limit to how large a cog I can use (currently 26t). I'm just looking to go 45/42, but keep my setup as-is, without worrying on dumping my chain on a bump-induced overshift. Also, I like to keep my spin up. I'm 56, and can't 'mash' like I used to. I try to keep my cadence above 70, even in steep hills.

    Also, I have spare rings galore from 40+ years of riding (most in 130mm, but a few old-school cyclotourist rings), and even a spare drive-side crank. So, yeah, a quick switch of pre-made cranks IS easier. Also, from my experience, adjusting a front derailleur is less bothersome than a rear. Works for me.

    BTW, the Sugino adapter looks like a plan...
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  10. #10
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    After looking at the video, I could see how the WickWerks was mounted, but I still liked the Sugino, so I went to the website. $60+, AND shipping from Japan? Holy mother of god!

    So, for $30, I bought the WickWerks. Works good (although I wish it wasn't dark gray..), and does exactly what I need.

    Thanks MMS......!
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  11. #11
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    You're welcome.

    Yeah, it's not the most aesthetic of things, but at least it works.
    use a torque wrench

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    After looking at the video, I could see how the WickWerks was mounted, but I still liked the Sugino, so I went to the website. $60+, AND shipping from Japan? Holy mother of god!

    So, for $30, I bought the WickWerks. Works good (although I wish it wasn't dark gray..), and does exactly what I need.

    Thanks MMS......!

    Yea Sugino stuff ain't cheap.

    I had my eye on their 0901XD crankset....but $400USD+shipping for an alloy crankset shipped from Japan, no thanks...
    "‘Photograph me on horseback,’ wrote Teddy Roosevelt in 1908. ‘Tennis, no. And golf is fatal.’ "

  13. #13
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    Since it seems the issue is solved do you mind going off topic to explain why someone would want to run 45/48 or 42/45 chainrings? It seems that such a small difference wouldn't be worth the weight of the extra chainring, derailleur, shifter, and cable so someone for whom that gear range works would just run 1x.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Since it seems the issue is solved do you mind going off topic to explain why someone would want to run 45/48 or 42/45 chainrings? It seems that such a small difference wouldn't be worth the weight of the extra chainring, derailleur, shifter, and cable so someone for whom that gear range works would just run 1x.
    It makes enough difference for myself. I often found that in 45/26, I needed something just a *bit* lower in gear inches. I may even try 42-39 rings if I decide to do one of the rides with the word "h3ll" in the title (the "hillier than h*ll hundred is the title of one such ride).

    Or, I suspect that Lelandjt might not be familiar with "half-step gearing"? The idea is to use a wider-spaced cassette, then split each gear with a narrowly-spaced ring drop. I'm running a 7-speed cassette, and with a 3-tooth drop between chains, I end up with a nearly evenly spaced selection of 14 distinct gear ratios, while maintaining a quicker-shifting short cage rear derailleur. In short, I use my front derailleur as a gear-splitter, not as a range-changer.

    I used to have a touring bike with a wider-spaced 6-cog freewheel, which I used "half-step plus granny" gearing with a 4 tooth drop between the big rings. Probably can work with 8 speed, but I don't see it working with 9+ speed equipment. Used to be VERY common on touring bikes, as well as flatland racers. Today, it's not nearly as common, but then, I'm still riding tubulars with box-section rims on this bike.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  15. #15
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    You lost me at "7 speed cassette". I don't speak eroica.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Or, I suspect that Lelandjt might not be familiar with "half-step gearing"? The idea is to use a wider-spaced cassette, then split each gear with a narrowly-spaced ring drop. I'm running a 7-speed cassette, and with a 3-tooth drop between chains, I end up with a nearly evenly spaced selection of 14 distinct gear ratios, while maintaining a quicker-shifting short cage rear derailleur. In short, I use my front derailleur as a gear-splitter, not as a range-changer.
    So, every other shift (up or down) you shift both your rear and front derailleurs?

    Sounds like a PITA with the imaginary benefit of maintaining cadence at X amount for slight changes in speed.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    You lost me at "7 speed cassette". I don't speak eroica.
    "Eroica"? I don't see what's "heroic" about a classic Cannondale; maybe you'se can 'splain?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    So, every other shift (up or down) you shift both your rear and front derailleurs?

    Sounds like a PITA with the imaginary benefit of maintaining cadence at X amount for slight changes in speed.
    Not at all; when descending, I usually do 'full' shifts, as well as when a big hill comes up. And, of course, if going through ALL the ratios, you only have to use both derailleurs on every OTHER shift.

    It's really great for those times when, riding on flat lands, the wind suddenly rises about 10+ mph, and I can go down a half-step, instead of a full gear. Also works well on smaller grade changes, when just a half-step shift is all you need, up or down. It's similar to having an 11-speed, but skip-shifting when you don't need those tiny, 1-tooth changes.

    And, having spent many years driving trucks with secondary gearboxes, I don't find it bothersome in the least. Certainly it's a lot easier to drive than a 4x4 'twin stick' Mack truck; look that one up on Youtube, if you want to see one in action!
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    "Eroica"? I don't see what's "heroic" about a classic Cannondale; maybe you'se can 'splain?
    L'Eroica are vintage bicycle events. I was referencing the fact that this was a setup used in the days before 9, 10, and 11spd cassettes allowed single tooth steps and explaining my lack of awareness of such setups. My first road bike was a 9spd Cannondale in 1996 with 11-23 cassette.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    L'Eroica are vintage bicycle events. I was referencing the fact that this was a setup used in the days before 9, 10, and 11spd cassettes allowed single tooth steps and explaining my lack of awareness of such setups. My first road bike was a 9spd Cannondale in 1996 with 11-23 cassette.
    Well, MY first (road) bike was an early 70's mid-level Belgian bike with, if I remember correctly, a 42/52 rings, and a 14-16-19-21-24 Campy freewheel, on low-flange hubs, box-section Ambrosio rims, and Conti Giro tires.

    "Eroica" in Italian means "heroic".
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    So, every other shift (up or down) you shift both your rear and front derailleurs?

    Sounds like a PITA with the imaginary benefit of maintaining cadence at X amount for slight changes in speed.
    It was a pain, but in the days of 5&6 speed freewheel most people had much wider gaps. If you did not race a 1 tooth gaps were non existent. Half step patterns were easier than what was referred to as alpine shift pattern

    Regardless of which pattern you had double shifts were common

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