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  1. #1
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    Mirror recommendations.

    Although I don't like the look of them I realized today that if I want to continue to live I need a rear view mirror. Any recommendations? Appearance is the only thing that matters.

  2. #2
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    I have tried a couple kinds of mirrors and none of them is the magic bullet. I have tried the helmet mounted mirror but the viewing spot is really limited. I have to take my eyes off the road and look in the tiny mirror and turn my head couple of times to get the whole viewing area in rear. I have tried mirror that mounts on my road handlebar. The viewing is better but when I change positions and I completely lose the best viewing spot that allows me to see passing cars. I have to make adjustment to get the ideal viewing spot every time I change positions. I have tried the mirror that mounts on my glasses and they don't stay put on that well and break easily.

    I have gave up with the idea of using mirrors. I try to stick to very low volume roads and turn my head often to check what is behind me on busy roads. I am deaf and don't hear cars coming up from behind. It would be interesting to what the others recommend.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1bamafan14 View Post
    Although I don't like the look of them I realized today that if I want to continue to live I need a rear view mirror. Any recommendations? Appearance is the only thing that matters.
    I have this one

    It is in the end cap of my left side of my road bar. Took a bit of getting used to. You have to look down towards it through your arms. Works in the uprights and the drops. Give a large field of view like a car rear view mirror.

  4. #4
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    I tried a couple different bar-end mirrors. Waste of money. They're small, with only a limited view angle and they vibrate, making it very hard to make out anything. Also, depending on my hand position, my arm often blocked my view. I decided turning my head works much better.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    I tried a couple different bar-end mirrors. Waste of money. They're small, with only a limited view angle and they vibrate, making it very hard to make out anything. Also, depending on my hand position, my arm often blocked my view. I decided turning my head works much better.
    The one I recommended does not do that. It is actually rather large.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dndrich View Post
    The one I recommended does not do that. It is actually rather large.
    One of the two I tried may not have been that exact model but it was certainly very similar and it also came from REI. I rode with it for a while, too lazy to take it off, but never really able to get much use out of it. Gone now and not missed. YMMV.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    I tried a couple different bar-end mirrors. Waste of money. They're small, with only a limited view angle and they vibrate, making it very hard to make out anything. Also, depending on my hand position, my arm often blocked my view. I decided turning my head works much better.
    I disagree, strongly. Takes practice, but they work for me, very well. If my arm is in the way, I move it, a little. much less disruption than turning my head, so I glance down much more frequently. It definitely makes riding in traffic safer for me.

    I like these:


    Cycling Mirrors: Sprintech Rear View Mirror Set

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    I disagree, strongly. Takes practice, but they work for me, very well.
    Well, sure, YMMV. They're cheap enough that it's not exactly a big risk to buy a couple and see what you think. If you don't like them, places like REI will even give you your money back. You like them, I don't, who knows what anyone else will decide.

  9. #9
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    I have to give props for the Chuck Harris mirrors; he's a legend in the Midwest area and supplies various shops and bicycle clubs in the state. You can also get them directly from him; google his name and you will find information.

    Once these mirrors are properly set, they don't need any further adjustments; no wobble, no vibration and a decent view of the road behind you. Still not a substitute for being aware of your surroundings while riding, but a nice aid, IMO.

  10. #10
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    I make 'em myself and have for decades. They work perfectly and I wouldn't ride 100' without one. There are no negatives. Here's my current one and it's smaller than it looks - it's about 1/2" square and sits about 1/8" from the glasses. I've posted about them before; do a search -
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mirror recommendations.-mirror-1.jpg  
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  11. #11
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    I should clarify that what bothered me was that no matter what I saw in my mirror, there was always a lot more I couldn't see. Trying to use it was a little like changing lanes on the freeway based only on what you could see in your sideview mirror, but worse. It gave me a false sense of security that I had any idea what was really behind me. To be safe, I always had to turn my head to know what was in the blindspot.

    But it could also matter that most of my riding is daylight, usually on the Sammamish River and Burke-Gilman trails around Lake Washington. The other traffic I'm watching for is other bicyclists who might be stealthily overtaking me as I pass a pedestrian or go around a puddle. If I was mostly commuting through surface traffic in downtown Seattle on a bike with flat bars instead of drops, dodging cars and watching more continuously what went in and out of my blindspot, it's possible I might have had a really different take on these things.

    Again, YMMV. These things are so cheap and so returnable if you don't like them, my attitude is that if you're at all interested, the simple answer is to buy one that's getting high marks from the people who do like them and see what you think.
    Last edited by Nicole Hamilton; 02-25-2012 at 11:07 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    Again, YMMV. These things are so cheap and so returnable if you don't like them, my attitude is that if you're at all interested, the simple answer is to buy one that's getting high marks from the people who do like them and see what you think.
    Nicole, that's a fair and balanced response (do I have to pay Fox News to use that phrase?).

    It does take practice, and my riding is different from yours. I commute on streets with a lot of traffic, often in the dark. The mirror gives me the ability to frequently monitor what's going on behind, and to communicate with overtaking drivers. I still glance back before moving in front of traffic, to be sure of spacing - that's necessary with the reduced-size image in the convex mirror.

    And to the OP, my suggestion is to try a helmet- or glasses-mounted mirror first. Those give the widest field of view, with the least interference. But not everyone can get the hang of them. I am nearsighted, and with my eyeglass correction there was just too much distortion. The bar-mounted mirrors have some limitations, but they work, at least for me. I have them on all my bikes.

  13. #13
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    After too many times of having a bar end mirror go out of adjustment...or fall off, I searched the interwebs go ideas and found the Bike-Eye mirror, which mounts to the frame at the junction of the head tube and the down tube.

    It works very well, and I highly recommend it.

    There is a video of it on the road on their website, and I believe QBP distributes it now, so you can get it in the U.S. originally, Harris Cyclery was importing it.

    http://www.bike-eye.com

    Mirror recommendations.-imageuploadedbytapatalk1330200574.136580.jpg

    Here it is mounted on my bike. I have the mirror itself on the non-drive side.

    Mirror recommendations.-imageuploadedbytapatalk1330200632.135468.jpg
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  14. #14
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    After riding for a while with my wife and getting really tired of turning around to see if she was still right behind me, I decided to give a mirror a try. I purchased a "Take A Look Cyclist Mirror" based on some customer reviews on Amazon. It took a while to get used to using it, but once it's set up correctly and you adjust to using it, I found it's one of the best purchases I've made. It's mounted to the visor of my helmet. Yes, I'm a road bike rider and know a helmet visor is frowned upon by some, but so is my mirror and running my lights even in daytime. Frankly I don't care. I like the visors protection from the sun and it's my opinion you can never be too safe. The mirror adds one more component to your safety. I wish I had purchased one years ago.

  15. #15
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    I like the Mirrycle mirror. Mounts in the bar end. Is designed for flat bars, but if you leave out the middle piece of the mount it doesn't interfere with your hands. All junctions tighten with allen bolts, so it does not vibrate or bounce out of adjustment. I tried a lot of mirrors, with the helmet or eyeglass mirrors I could not get used to having something in the corner of my field of vision. I then tried the ones that are faired into the end of the bar, but found that they were too small and the fisheye was too much to be useful for me. I really liked using the Zefel Cyclop mirror, but the after mount broke on the third one after 6 months to a year, I gave up. Have now had the Mirrycle for 4 years, good as new. My wife and daughter have them as well (and I have two on my recumbent. Shh!).
    I agree that a mirror is not a substitute for a quick look before moving over, but I find it very useful for keeping an eye on what is going on behind me. Wen I ride a bike without one, I feel naked, like riding in a car without a seatbelt.

  16. #16
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    I've been using the Italian Road Bike mirror for the last 2 years and love it. It does take little lining up when you install them but once you have it dialled in; its great. It does not bounce around or move when hit; made of real glass mirror with no distortion.
    I use it to be able to see if there are cars coming up behind me or if my friend is falling back (ok; this doesn't happen too often....). I can even call "car back" when I'm pulling up front in a group. Very well worth the money and I wouldn't ride without one.

    Here's a link to what it looks like...
    http://www.aspirevelotech.com/Listings/Mirror.htm

  17. #17
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    I use and highly recommend this one. It does not need to be mounted using permanent methods, it stays where it's put, it's flexible enough to be positioned out of your way, and it's large enough to give a great field of view.

    The only downside is it looks goofy, kind of like an insect antenna. But if you've decided to rock a mirror you already know the cycling fashionistas care more about how you look than how you ride. So screw 'em.

    Last edited by ddimick; 02-25-2012 at 03:47 PM.

  18. #18
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    I love the bikeye. However I have to lay my bike on it's left side to carry it in the car so it sticks out so far that it broke from the weight. This one is almost as good and it still allows me to lay the bike down when I need to: Amazon.com: Zefal Spy Bicycle Mirror: Sports & Outdoors Also more flexible mounting options.

  19. #19
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    I have this on both of my road bikes. It mounts on the end of my handlebars, has a wide field of vision, and stays put.
    Blackburn Multi-Mirror


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogus View Post
    ... I purchased a "Take A Look Cyclist Mirror" based on some customer reviews on Amazon. It took a while to get used to using it, but once it's set up correctly and you adjust to using it, I found it's one of the best purchases I've made. ....
    Yep. The thing about a helmet or eyeglasses mounted mirror is that you can get a wide field of view and also scan behind you by rotating your head a bit. I find this really helpful in maintaining speed on narrow roads where I often have to take the lane to avoid hazards on the shoulder, get out of the door zone of random cars parked along the road, etc.. I have mine set up high so that it is out of my direct line of vision and also provides a line of site over my shoulder while in my normal riding position.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mirror recommendations.-take-look.jpg  

  21. #21
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    Heads up

    +1 to a helmet-mounted mirror.

    You can easily adjust them so that you don't lose sight of the road ahead, and can still be aware of what's coming up from behind with a quick flick of the eye. And minor movements of your head allow you to change your field of view, if desired. No looking down and away from the road ahead, as with a bar-mount mirror (which I also have on some bikes for short hops when I am helmet-less).

    Ride safely.

  22. #22
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    One thing to consider is how good your own peripheral vision is. Not to brag, but I am a freak in regards to this, so a simple helmet mounted mirror is all I need and I rarely look directly into the mirror when it is adjusted properly.

    There are many options out there, and I do agree with some of the posters who say to try a few out, and return the ones you don't want. Think about how and where you ride, how often you are going to be looking in the mirror based on traffic conditions, and your individual habits when on the bike.

  23. #23
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    I'm pleased with the "Italian Road Bike Mirror". I've been using it on my commuter for about six months. It's a bit of a pain to set up since you have to remove the bar tape, but so far it has stayed put. It doesn't vibrate or get knocked out of position.

  24. #24
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    Does the Bikeye mirror really work in that position? Seems you mostly would obscure the view with your legs.

  25. #25
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    +1 for the Italian Road Bike Mirror. Used mine for about a year now with no problems and really like it.

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