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  1. #1
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    More (hinky) news about Campagnolo H11 disc...

    https://www.cxmagazine.com/campagnol...entaur-potenza

    Highlights:

    -A) Centerlock disc rotors? Strange that Campagnolo would use Shimano's standard (and pay licensing), rather than use ISO.

    B) Calipers are permanently built at set rotor sizes. You're stuck with 160mm front, and either 140 or 160mm rear depending on what caliper set you buy. Changing rear rotor sizes means buying an entire new caliper set?!
    "‘Photograph me on horseback,’ wrote Teddy Roosevelt in 1908. ‘Tennis, no. And golf is fatal.’ "

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    https://www.cxmagazine.com/campagnol...entaur-potenza

    Highlights:

    -A) Centerlock disc rotors? Strange that Campagnolo would use Shimano's standard (and pay licensing), rather than use ISO.

    B) Calipers are permanently built at set rotor sizes. You're stuck with 160mm front, and either 140 or 160mm rear depending on what caliper set you buy. Changing rear rotor sizes means buying an entire new caliper set?!
    A) Not really - the de facto standard for fork makers is set to be AFS / Centrelock when they are designing clearance at the hub end of the fork blade - look at all of Comumbus' current offering for instance - there's no space for ISO bolt heads to pass the fork blade, so commercially it's better in this case to go with the flow than fight an uphill battle against frame and fork makers.

    B) Not quite. It's true that front calipers are fixed at 160 but the rear caliper can be used with an adaptor - so if you opt for the 140 caliper / rotor combo and wish later to fit a 160 mm rotor, the adapter can be added, or you can go straight to 160. Campagnolo make a recommendation based around combined rider / bike / load weight for varying the rear disc size and therefore caliper specification.

    The direct connection of the caliper to the frame was felt to be the best option but the opportunity to introduce some flexibility was also recognised. The bulk of braking is generally done on the front and the larger rotor, in testing, gave the best performance (more effective torque transfer and greater ability to absorb / dissipate heat).
    HTH
    Graeme
    Velotech Cycling Ltd
    Nationally recognised & accredited training for cycle mechanics
    Main Campagnolo SC UK

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